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LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



GIFT OF" 



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Class 




15 

SMI T II S X I A X I X S T I I U T I < ) X 

BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY: J. W. POWELL, DIRECTOR 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



OF THE 



CHINOOKAH" LANGUAGES 

(INCLUDING THE CHINOOK JARGON) 



BY 



JAMES CONSTANTINE FILLING^ 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
1893 



SMITHSONIAN INST1T U T I ON 

BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY: J. W. POWELL, DIRECTOR 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



OF THE 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES 



(INCLUDING THE CHINOOK JARGON} 



BY 



JAMES CONSTANTINE FILLING 




I 



WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
1893 



LINGUISTIC BIBLIOGRAPHIES ISSUED BY THE BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY. 



Smithsonian institution Bureau of ethnology. Catalogue of lin 
guistic manuscripts in the library of the Bureau of ethnology. By 
James C. Pilling. 

In Bureau of ethnology first annual report; half-title as above p. 553, text pp. 
555-577, Washington, 1881, royal 8. 
Issued separately with cover title as follows : 

Catalogue | of | linguistic manuscripts | in the | library of the Bureau 
of ethnology | by | James C. Pilling | (Extracted from the first annual 
report of the Bureau | of ethnology) | [Vignette] | 

Washington | Government printing office | 1881 

Cover title as above, no inside title, half-title as under entry next above p. 553, 
text pp. 555-577, royal 8. One hundred copies issued. 

Smithsonian institution Bureau of ethnology | J.W.Powell director 
| Proof-sheets | of a | bibliography | of | the languages | of the | North 
American Indians | by | James Constantine Pilling | (Distributed only 
to collaborators) | 

Washington | Government printing office | 1885 

Title verso blank 1 1. notice (signed J. W. Powell) p. iii, preface (November 4, 1884) 
pp. v-viii, introduction pp. ix-x, list of authorities pp. xi-xxxvi, list of libraries re 
ferred to by initials pp. xxxvii-xxxviii, list of fac-similes pp. xxxix-xl, text pp. 
1-839, additions and corrections pp. 841-1090, index of languages and dialects pp. 
1091-1135, plates, 4. Arranged alphabetically by name of author, translator, or 
first word of title. One hundred and ten copies printed, ten of them on one side of 
the sheet only. 

Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology : J . W. Powell, director 
| Bibliography | of the | Eskimo language | by | James Constantine 
Pilling | [Vignette] | 
Washington | Government printing office | 1887 

Cover title as above, title as above verso blank I 1. preface (April 20, 1887) pp. iii-v, 
text pp. 1-109, chronologic index pp. 111-116, 8 fac-similes, 8. An edition of 100 copies 
issued in royal 8. 

Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology : J. W. Powell, director 
| Bibliography | of the | Siouan languages | by | James Constautiue 
Pilling | [Vignette] | 

Washington | Government printing office | 1887 

Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. preface (September 1, 1887) pp. 
iii-v, text pp. 1-82, chronologic index pp. 83-87, 8. An edition of 100 copies issued 
in royal 8. 

in 



IV LINGUISTIC BIBLIOGRAPHIES, BUREAU OF ETHNOLOGY. 

Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology : J. W. Powell, director 
| Bibliography | of the | Iroquoian languages | by | James Con stantine 
Pilling | [Vignette] | 

Washington | Government printing office | 1888 

Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. preface (December 15, 1888) 
pp. iii-vi, text pp. 1-180, addenda pp. 181-189, chronologic index pp. 191-208, 9 fac 
similes, 8. An edition of 100 copies issued in royal 8. 

Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology : J. W. Powell, director 
| Bibliography | of the | Muskhogean languages | by | James Constan- 
tiue Pilling | [Vignette] | 

Washington | Government printing office | 1889 

Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. preface (May 15, 1889) pp. iii-v, 
text pp. 1-103, chronologic index pp. 105-114, 8. An edition of 100 copies issued in 
royal 8. 

Bibliographic notes | on | Eliot s Indian bible | and | on his other 
translations and works in the | Indian language of Massachusetts | 
Extract from a " Bibliography of the Algonquian languages " j 
[Vignette] | 

Washington | Government printing office | 1890 

Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-58, 21 fac-similes. 
royal 8. Forms pp. 127-184 of the Bibliography of the Algonquian languages, title 
of which follows. Two hundred and fifty copies issued. 

Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology : J.W.Powell, director 
| Bibliography | of the | Algonquian languages | by | James Coiistan- 
tine Pilling | [Vignette] | 

Washington | Government printing office | 1891 

Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. preface (June 1, 1891) pp. iii-iv, 
introduction p. v, index of languages pp. vii-viii, list of fac-similcs pp. ix-x, text 
pp. 1-549, addenda pp. 551-575, chronologic index pp. 577-614, 82 fac-similes, 8. An 
edition of 100 copies issued in royal 8. 

Smithsonian institution | Bureau of ethnology : J.W.Powell, director 
| Bibliography | of the | Athapascan languages | by | James Con stan 
tine Pilling | [Vignette] | 

Washington | Government printing office | 1892 

Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 1 1. [list of] linguistic bibliog 
raphies issued by the Bureau of Ethnology pp. iii-iv, preface (June 15, 1892) pp. 
v-vii, introduction p. ix, index of languages pp. xi-xii, list of fac-similes p. xiii, 
text pp. 1-112, addenda pp. 113-115, chronologic index pp. 117-125, 4 fac-similes, 8. 
An edition of 100 copies issued in royal 8. 



PREFACE. 



The designation given the family of languages treated of in this 
bibliography is based upon the name of a tribe living near the mouth 
of the Columbia River, from whom a vocabulary was obtained by 
Gabriel Franchere, of the Pacific Fur Company, about 1812, and pub 
lished in his "Relation" 1 in 1820, under the name Chinoiique ou 
Tchinouk. This vocabulary, consisting of thirty-three words, thirteen 
numerals, and eleven phrases, is given by Gallatin in his "Synopsis" 2 
with the spelling of the name anglicized to Chinook ; and, though based 
upon the speech of but a single tribe, it was adopted by him as the 
name of a family of languages. 

The family includes a number of tribes whose habitat, to quote from 
Major Powell, 3 " extended from the mouth of the river up its course for 
some 200 miles, or to The Dalles. According to Lewis and Clarke, our 
best authorities on the pristine home of this family, most of their vil 
lages were on the banks of the river, chiefly upon the northern bank, 
though they probably claimed the land upon either bank for several 
miles back. Their villages also extended on the Pacific coast north 
ward nearly to the northern extension of Shoalwater Bay, and to the 
south to about Tilamook Head, some 20 miles from the mouth of the 
Columbia." 

As will be seen by reference to the list of tribal names given on a 
subsequent page, the number of languages embraced within the family 
is small; and the amount of material recorded under "Chinook" will 
be found to more than equal that given under the names of all the other 
divisions of the family combined. 

As a matter of fact, but little, comparatively, has been done in the 
collection of linguistic material relating to this family, a fact all the 
more surprising when it is considered that they have been long in 
contact with the whites. There has been no grammar of the language 
published, and until lately none has been compiled; there is but one 
printed dictionary that of Gibbs and the vocabularies are neither 
great in length nor wide in scope. There is hope of a better state of 

1 Relation d un voyage a la cote nord-onest do 1 Ame rique Septentrionale dans les 
anne"es 1810, 1811, 1812, 1813 et 1814. Montreal, 1820. 

2 Synopsis of the Indian tribes within the United States east of the Rocky Moun- 
tains,andinthe British and Russian possessions in North America. Cambridge, 1836. 

3 Indian linguistic families of America, north of Mexico. Washington, 1891. 

v 



VI PREFACE. 

affairs, however; for Dr. Franz Boas, the latest and most thorough 
worker in the Chinookan field, has his grammar, dictionary, and texts 
in an advanced state of preparation for publication by the Bureau of 
Ethnology. His material, collected during 1890 and 1891, was gathered 
none too soon, for, as will be seen by the extract from the introduction 
to his legends, which he has kindly permitted me to make and which 
is given on page 7 of this paper, the opportunity for so doing would 
soon have passed. 

It needs but a glance through the accompanying pages to show the 
preponderance of material, both published and in manuscript, relating 
to the Jargon over that of the Chinookan languages proper, a prepon 
derance so great that, were it proper to speak of the Jargon as an 
American language, a change of title to this bibliography would be 
necessary. Made up as it is from several Indian tongues, the Chinookan, 
Salishan, Wakashan, and Shahaptian principally, and from at least 
two others, the English and the French, the Chinook Jargon might 
with almost equal propriety have been included in a bibliography of 
any one of the other native languages entering into its composition. It 
is made a part of the Chinookan primarily because of its name and 
secondarily from the fact that that family has contributed a much greater 
number of words to its vocabulary than has any one of the others. 

Under various authors herein Blanchet, Deiners, Gibbs, Hale, 
Le Jeune, and others will be found brief notes relating to the Jargon, 
trade language, or international idiom, as it is variously called ; and 
the following succinct account of its origin from Dr. George Gibbs, 1 
the first to attempt its comprehensive study, completes its history: 

The origin of this Jargon, a conventional language similar to the Lingua Franca 
of the Mediterranean, the Negro-English-Dutch of Surinam, the Pigeon English of 
China, and several other mixed tongues, dates back to the fur droguers of the last 
century. Those mariners, whose enterprise in the fifteen years preceding 1800 
explored the intricacies of the northwest coast of America, picked up at their gen 
eral rendezvous, Nootka Sound, various native words useful in barter, and thence 
transplanted them, with additions from the English, to the shores of Oregon. Even 
bef oretheirday, the coasting trade and warlike expeditious of the northern tribes, 
themselves a seafaring race, had opened up a partial understanding of each other s 
speech ; for when, in 1792, Vancouver s officers visited Gray s Harbor they found that 
the natives, though speaking a different language, understood many words of the 
Nootka. 

On the arrival of Lewis and Clarke at the mouth of the Columbia, in 1806, the 
new language, from the sentences given by them, had evidently attained some form. 
It was with the arrival of Astor s party, however, that the Jargon received its prin 
cipal impulse. Many more words of English were then brought in, and for the tirst 
time the French, or rather the Canadian and Missouri patois of the French, was 
introduced. The principal seat of the company being at Astoria, not only a large 
addition of Chinook words was made, but a considerable number was taken from 
the Chihalis, who immediately bordered- that tribe on the north, each owning a 
portion of Shoal water Bay. The words adopted from the several languages were, 

1 Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon. Washington, 1863. 



PREFACE. VII 

naturally enough, those most easily uttered by all, except, of course, that objects 
new to the natives found their names in French or English, and such modifications 
were made in pronunciation as suited tongues accustomed to different sounds. Thus 
the gutturals of the Indians were softened or dropped and the/ and r of the English 
and French, to them unpronounceable, were modified into p and I. Grammatical 
forms were reduced to their simplest expression and variations in mood and tense 
conveyed only by adverbs or by the context. The language continued to receive 
additions and assumed a more distinct and settled meaning under the Northwest 
and Hudson s Bay Companies, who succeeded Astor s party, as well as through the 
American settlers in Oregon. Its advantage was soon perceived by the Indians, and 
the Jargon became to some extent a means of communication between natives of 
different speech as well as between them and the whites. It was even used as such 
between Americans and Canadians. It was at first most in vogue upon the Lower 
Columbia and the Willamette, whence it spread to Puget Sound and with the 
extension of trade found its way far up the coast, as well as the Columbia and 
Fraser rivers; and there are now few tribes between the 42d and 57th parallels of 
latitude in which there are not to be found interpreters through its medium. Its 
prevalence and easy acquisition, while of vast convenience to traders and settlers, 
has tended greatly to hinder the acquirement of the original Indian languages; so 
much so that, except by a few missionaries and pioneers, hardly one of them is 
spoken or understood by white men in all Oregon and Washington Territory. Not 
withstanding its apparent poverty in number of words and the absence of grammat 
ical forms, it possesses much more flexibility and power of expression than might be 
imagined and really serves almost every purpose of ordinary intercourse. 

The number of words constituting the Jargon proper has been variously stated. 
Many formerly employed have become in great measure obsolete, while others have 
been locally introduced. Thus, at The Dalles of the Columbia, various terms are 
common which would not be intelligible at Astoria or on Puget Sound. In making 
the following selection, I have included all those which, on reference to a number 
of vocabularies, I have found current at any of thesa places, rejecting on the other 
hand such as individuals partially acquainted with the native languages have 
employed for their own convenience. The total number falls a little short of five 
hundred words. 

This international idiom, as it is called by Mr. Hale, is yet a live 
language, and, though lapsing into disuse being superseded by the 
English in the land of its birth, is gradually extending along the 
northwest coast, adding to its vocabulary as it travels, until it has 
become the means of intertribal communication between the Indians 
speaking different languages and between them and the white dwellers 
in British Columbia and portions of Alaska. Indeed, there seems 
to be almost a revival of the early interest shown in it, if we may judge 
from the amount of manuscript material relating to it now being made 
ready to put into print. 

One of the most curious and interesting of all the curious attempts 
which have been made to instruct and benefit the Indians by means of 
written characters, is that known as the Kainloops Wawa, a periodical 
described herein at some length under the name of its founder, Pere 
Le Jeune. Written in an international language, " set up " in steno 
graphic characters, and printed on a mimeograph by its inventor, 
editor, reporter, printer, and publisher all in one, this little weekly 
seems to leave nothing in the way of novelty to be desired. The account 



VIII PREFACE. 

of the reverend father s methods and purposes, quoted 011 page 48 from 
one of his papers, will well repay perusal. 

The present volume embraces 270 titular entries, of which 229 relate 
to printed books and articles and 41 to manuscripts. Of these, 253 
have been seen and described by the compiler (222 of the prints and 31 
of the manuscripts), leaving 17 as derived from outside sources (7 of the 
prints and 10 manuscripts). Of those unseen by the writer, titles and 
descriptions have been received in all cases from persons who have 
actually seen the works and described them for him. 

So far as possible, direct comparison has been made with the works 
themselves during the proof-reading. For this purpose, besides his 
own books, the writer has had access to those in the libraries of Con 
gress, the Bureau of Ethnology, the Smithsonian Institution, George 
town University, and to several private collections in the city of Wash 
ington. Mr. Wilberforce Eames has compared the titles of works con 
tained in his own library and in the Lenox, and recourse has been had 
to a number of librarians throughout the country for tracings, photo 
graphs, etc. 

I am indebted to the Director of the Bureau, Major Powell, for the 
unabated interest shown in my bibliographic work, for the opportu 
nities he has afforded me to prosecute it under the most favorable cir 
cumstances, and for his continued advice and counsel. 

Many items of interest have been furnished me; by Dr. Franz Boas; 
the Eev. Myron Eells, Union City, Wash.; Mr. John K. Gill, Portland, 
Oregon; Hon. Horatio Hale, Clinton, Ontario; Father Le Jeune, Kam- 
loops. B. C. ; Maj. Edmond Mallet, Washington, D. C. ; Father St. Onge, 
Troy, K. Y., and Dr. T. S. Buhner, Cedar City, Utah. It gives me pleas 
ure to make record of my obligations to these gentlemen. 




WASHINGTON, D. C., March 10, 1893. 



INTRODUCTION. 



In the compilation of this catalogue the aim has been to include every 
thing, printed or in manuscript, relating to the Chinookan language 
and to the Chinook jargon books, pamphlets, articles in magazines, 
tracts, serials, etc., and such reviews and announcements of publications 
as seemed worthy of notice. 

The dictionary plan has been followed to its extreme limit, the subject 
and tribal indexes, references to libraries, etc., being included in one 
alphabetic series. The primary arrangement is alphabetic by authors, 
translators of works into the native languages being treated as authors. 
Under each author the arrangement is, first, printed works, and second, 
manuscripts, each group being given chronologically; and in the case 
of printed books each work is followed through its various editions 
before the next in chronologic order is taken up. 

Anonymously printed works are entered under the name of the author, 
when known, and under the first word of the title, not an article or 
preposition, when not known. A cross-reference is given from the first 
words of anonymous titles when entered under an author and from the 
first words of all titles in the Indian languages, whether anonymous or 
not. Manuscripts are entered under the author when known, under 
the dialect to which they refer when he is not known. 

Each author s name, with his title, etc., is entered in full but once, i.e., 
in its alphabetic order; every other mention of him is by surname and 
initials only. 

All titular matter, including cross-references thereto, is in brevier, all 
collations, descriptions, notes, and index matter in nonpareil. 

In detailing contents and in adding notes respecting contents, the 
spelling of proper names used in the particular work itself has been 
followed, and so far as possible the language of the respective writers is 
given. In the index entries of the tribal names the compiler has adopted 
that spelling which seemed to him the best. 

As a general rule initial capitals have been used in titular matter in 
only two cases: first, for proper names, and, second, when the word 
actually appears on the title-page with an initial capital and with the 
remainder in small capitals or lower case letters. In giving titles in the 
German language the capitals in the case of all substantives have been 
respected. 

In those comparatively few cases of works not seen by the compiler 
the fact is stated or the entry is followed by an asterisk within curves, 
and in either case the authority is usually given. 

IX 



INDEX OF LANGUAGES. 



Page. 

Cascade 13 

Catlilascon 13 

Chinook 16 

Chinook jargon 1(5 

Clakama 18 

Clatsop 18 

Nihaloth 56 

Wahaikan 74 

Wappo 74 

Wasko 74 

Watlala 74 



LIST OF FACSIMILES. 



Page. 

Title-page of Le Jeune s Kamloops Wawa 47 

Title-page of Le Jeune s Jargon Hyinn Book 50 

Title-page of Le Jeune s Jargon Primer 52 

XIH 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE CHI NOOK AN LANGUAGES. 



BY JAMES 0. PILLING. 



( An asterisk within parentheses indicates that the compiler has seen no copy of the work referred to.) 



A. 



Allen (Mies A. J.) Ten years iii 
Oregon. | Travels and adventures | of 
| doctor E. White and lady | west of 
the Rocky mountains ; | with | inci 
dents of two sea voyages via Sandwich 
| Islands around Cape Horn; | contain 
ing also a | brief history of the mis 
sions and settlements of the country 
origin of | the provisional govern 
ment number and customs of the 
Indians | incidents witnessed while 
traversing and residing in the | terri 
tory description of the soil, produc 
tion and | climate of the country. | 
Compiled by miss A. J. Allen. | 

Ithaca, N. Y. : | Mack, Andrus & co. 
printers. | 1848. 

Title verso copyright (1848) 1 1. introduction 
pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, text pp. 17-399, 8. 

A few Chinook jargon sentences (from Lee 
and Frost, Ten years in Oregon), pp. 395-396. 

Gopietseen: Boston Athenaeum. 

A later edition with title page as follows : 

Ten years | in | Oregon, j Travels 

and adventures | of | doctor E. White | 
and lady, | west of the Rocky moun 
tains; | with | incidents of two sea 
voyages via Sandwich | Islands around 
Cape Horn; | containing, also, a | brief 
history of the missions and settlement 
of the country or- | igin of the provi 
sional government number and cus 
toms of | the Indians incidents wit 
nessed while traversing | and residing 
in the territory description of | the 
soil production and climate. | Compiled 
by miss A. J. Allen. | 

Ithaca, N. Y. : | press of Andrus, 
Ganntlett & Co, | 1850. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, 
contents pp. vii-xvi, text pp. 17-430, 12. 



Allen (A. J.) Continued. 

Linguistic contents as under title next ahove, 
pp. 395-396 . 

Copies seen : Astor, British Museum, Con 
gress, Dunbar. 

A later edition with title-page as follows : 

Thrilling adventures, | travels and 

explorations | of | doctor Elijah White, 
| among the | Rocky mountains | and 
in the | far west. | With | incidents of 
two sea voyages via Sand- | wich 
Islands around Cape Horn; | contain 
ing also a brief history of the missions 
and settlement of the country [ 
origin of the provisional governments 
of the western | territories number 
and customs of the Indians j incidents 
witnessed while traversing and re- | 
siding in the territories description of 
| the soil, productions and climate. 
Compiled by miss A. J. Allen. | 

New York : | J. W. Yale. | 1859. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, 
contents pp. vii-xvi, text pp. 17-430. 12. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above, 
pp. 395-396. 

Copies seen : Bancroft, Congress. 
Anderson (Alexander Caulfield). Price 
one dollar and fifty cents. [ Hand-book 
| and | map | to | the gold region | of 
| Frazer s and Thompson s rivers, | 
with | table of distances. | By Alexan 
der C. Anderson, | late chief trader 
Hudson bay co. s service. | To which is 
appended | Chinook Jargon language 
used etc., etc, | 

Published by J. J, Lecount, | San 
Francjscq. | Entered [&c. two lines.] 
[1858.] 

Cover title, text pp. 1-31, map, 32. 

VQcg,bulary of the Chinook Jargon, pp. 25-3J. 

1 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Anderson (A. C.) Continued. 

In the only copy of this work I have seen, 
Mr. Anderson has appended a manuscript note 
as follows : This vocabulary, procured by the 
publisher from some one in S. F.. is a miserable 
affair, and was appended without my knowl 
edge. A. c. A. 

Copies seen : Bancroft. 

Vocabulary of the Chinook language. 

Manuscript, 14 pages folio ; in the library of 
the Bureau of Ethnology. Forwarded 1o Dr. 
Geo. Gibbs, Nov. 7, 1857. 

Contains about 200 words and phrases. 

Armstrong (A. N.) Oregon: | comprising 
a | brief history and full description | 
of the territories of | Oregon and Wash 
ington, | embracing the | cities, towns, 
rivers, bays, | harbors, coasts, moun 
tains, valleys, | prairies and plains; 
together with remarks | upon the social 
position, productions, resources, and | 
prospects of the country, a dissertation 
upon | the climate, and a full descrip 
tion of ( the Indian tribes of the Pacific 
| slope, their manners, etc. | Inter 
spersed with | incidents of travel and 
adventure. | By A. N. Armstrong, | for 



Armstrong (A. N.) Continued. 

three years a government surveyor in 
Oregon. | 

Chicago : | published by Chas. Scott 
& co. | 1857. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. copy of correspond 
ence pp. iii-iv. index pp. v-vi, text pp. 7-147, 12. 
Chinook Jargon vocabulary (75 words and 
numerals 1-10, 20, 100, 1000), pp. 145-146. 

Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athenaeum, Con 
gress. 

Astor : This word following a title or within paren 
theses after a note indicates that a copy of the 
work referred, to has been seen by the compiler 
ill the Astor Library, Xew York City. 
Authorities : 

See Dufosse (K.) 
Bolls (M.) 
Field (T.W.) 
Gibbs (G.) 
Leclerc (C.) 
Ludewig (H. E.) 
Pilling (J.C.) 
Pott(A.F.) 
Quaritch (B.) 
Sabin (J.) 
Steiger (E.) 
Triibner <fc co. 
Trumbull (J.H.) 
Vater (J. S.) 



B. 



Bancroft: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler in the library of Mr. H. H. Bancroft, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Bancroft (Hubert Howe). The j native 
races | of ] the Pacific states ; of | North 
America. | By | Hubert Ho we Bancroft. 
| Volume I. | Wild tribes [-V. | Prim 
itive history], | 

New York: | 1). Appleton and com 
pany. | 1874 [-1876]. 

5 vols. maps and plates, 8. Vol. I. Wild 
tribes; II. Civilized nations; III. Myths and 
languages ; IV Antiquities ; V. Primitive his 
tory. 

Some copies of vol. 1 are dated 1875. (Eames, 
Lenox.) 

About one-third of vol. 3 of this work is 
devoted to the languages of the west coast. 

Brief reference to the Chinook Jargon and 
its derivation, pp. 556-557. Classification of the 
aboriginal languages of the Pacific states (pp. 
562-573) includes the Chinook, p. 505. "The 
Chinook language" (pp. 626-62 J) includes a gen 
eral discussion, pp. 626-628; Personal pronouns 
in the TVatlala dialect, p. 628; Conjugation of 
the verbs to be cold and to kill, pp. 628-629. 
Short comparative vocabulary of the Columbian 



Bancroft (H. H.) Continued. 

and Mexican tongues includes seven words of 
the TVaiilatpu, Molale, AVatlala, Chinook. 
Calapooya, Aztec, and Sonora, p. 631. The 
Chinook Jargon (pp. 631-635) includes a gen 
eral discussion, pp. 631-634 ; Lord s prayer with 
interlinear English translation, p. 635. 

Copies seen .- Astor, Bancroft, Brinton, British 
Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Eames, George 
town, Powell. 

Priced by Leclerc, 1878, no. 49, 150 fr. Bought 
by Quaritch at the Ramirez sale, no. 957. for 51. 
15s. and priced by him, no. 29917, 51. 

- The | native races | of | the Pacific 
states | of | North America. | By | Hu 
bert Howe Bancroft. | Volume!. | Wild 
tribes [-V. | Primitive history]. | 

Author s Copy. | San Francisco. 1874 
[-1876]. 

5 vols. 8. Similar, except on title-page, to 
previous edition. One hundred copies issued. 

Copies seen : Bancroft, British Museum, Con 
gress. 

In addition to the above the work lias been 
issued with the imprint of Longmans, London ; 
Maisonneuve, Paris; and Brockhaus, Leipzig; 
none of which have I seen. 
The works | of | Hubert Howe Ban 
croft. | Volume I[-V]. | The native 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



Bancroft (H. H.) Continued, 
races. | Vol. I. Wild tribes [-V. Primi 
tive history]. | 

San Francisco : | A. L. Bancroft & j 
company, publishers. | 1882. 

5 vols. 8. This series will include the His- j 
tory of Central America, History of Mexico, j 
etc., each with its own system of numbering, 
and also numbered consecutively in the series. 

Of these works there have been published 
vols. 1-39. The opening paragraph of vol. 39 j 
gives the following information : This volume | 
closes the narrative portion of my historical 
series ; there yet remains to be completed the 
biographical section. 

Copies seen: Bancroft, British Museum, j 
Bureau of Ethnology, Congress. 
Bates (Henry Walton). Stanford s | com- j 
pendiurn of geography and travel | 
based on HellwalcVs l Die Erde und ihre 
Volker j Central America | the West In- \ 
dies | and | South America | Edited and 
extended | By H. W. Bates, | assistant- | 
secretary of the Royal geographical so- ! 
ciety; | author of The naturalist on I 
the river Amazons \ With | ethnolog 
ical appendix by A. H. Keane, B. A. | 
Maps and illustrations | 

London | Edward Stanford, 55, Char 
ing cross, S.W. | 1878 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. frontispiece 1 1. title 
verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. 
vii-xvi, list of illustrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of 
maps p. xix, text pp. 1-441, appendix pp. 443- 
561, index pp. 563-571, maps and plates, 8. 

Keane (A. H.), Ethnography and philology 
of America, pp. 443-561. 

Copies seen: British Museum, Congress, 
Eames, Geological Survey, National Museum. 
Stanford s | Compendium of geogra 
phy and travel | based on Hellwald s 
Die Erde und ihre Volker | Central 
America j the West Indies | and | South 
America | Edited and extended | By H. 
W. Bates, | Author of [&c. two lines] 
| With | ethnological appendix by A. 
H. Keaue, M. A. J. | Maps and illustra 
tions | Second and revised edition | 

London | Edward Stanford, 55, Char 
ing cross, S. W. | 1882 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 
1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, list of 
illustrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of maps p. xix, 
text pp. 1-441, appendix pp. 443-561, index pp. 
563-571, maps and plates, 8. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above, 
pp. 443-561. 

Copies seen : British Museum, Harvard. 
- Stanford s | compendium of geogra 
phy and travel | based on Hellwald s 



Bates (H. W.) Continued. 

Die Erde und ihre Volker | Central 
America | the West Indies | and South 
America | Edited and extended | By H. 
W. Bates, | assistant-secretary [&c. two 
lines] | With | ethnological appendix 
by A. H. Keane, M. A. I. | Maps and 
illustrations | Third edition | 

London | Edward Stanford, 55, Char 
ing cross, S. W. | 1885 

Collation and contents as in second edition, 
title and description of which are given above. 

Copies seen: Geological Survey. 

Beach (William Wallace). The | Indian 
miscellany ; containing j Papers on the 
History, Antiquities, Arts, Languages, 
Religions, Traditions and Superstitious 
| of | the American aborigines ; ! with | 
Descriptions of their Domestic Life, 
Manners, Customs, | Traits, Amuse 
ments and Exploits ; | travels and ad 
ventures in the Indian country ; | Inci 
dents of Border Warfare ; Missionary 
Relations, etc. | Edited by W. W. 
Beach. | 

Albany : | J. Muusell, 82 State street. 
| 1877. ^ 

Title verso blank t 1. dedication verso blank 
1 1. advertisement verso blank 1 1. contents pp. 
vii-viii, text pp. 9-477, errata p. 478, index pp. 
479-490, 8. 

G-atschet (A. S.), Indian languages of the 
Pacific states and territories, pp. 416-447. 

Copies seen: Astor, Brinton, British Museum, 
Congress, Eames, Geological Survey, George 
town, Massachusetts Historical Society, 
Pilling, Wisconsin Historical Society. 

Priced by Leclerc, 1878 catalogue, no. 2663. 20 
fr. ; the Murphy copy, no. 197, brought $1.25; 
priced by Clarke & co. 1886 catalogue, no. 6271, 
$3.50, and by Littlefteld, Xov. 1887, no. 50, $4. 

Belden (Lieut. George P.) [Vocabulary 
of the Chinook Jargon.] 

Manuscript, pp. 1-44, 12, in the library of the 
Bureau of Ethnology, "Washington. D. C. Re 
corded in a blank book. 

Explanatory, p. 1. Vocabulary, alphabet 
ically arranged by English words, pp. 2-37. 
Numerals 1-10, 20, 30, 100, 1000, p. 38. Explana 
tory notes, pp. 39-44. 

A copy of the manuscript titled as follows : 

Vocabulary of the Chinook Jargon. | 

Collected by | Lieut, G. P. Belden. | 
Arranged by | J. Curtin. 

Manuscript; title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 
1-53, srn. 4; in the library of the Bureau of 
Ethnology. Recorded in a blank book. 

The material is the same as in the original, 
but more systematically arranged, and the 
spelling is changed to more modern usage. 






BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Berghaus (Dr. Heinrich). Allgemeiner 
| ethnographischer Atlas | oder | Atlas | 
der Volker-Kunde. | Eine Sammlung | \ 
von iieiinzehn Karten, | auf denendie, j 
um die Mitte des neiinzehnten Jahr- 
hunderts statt findeude geographische I 
Verbreitung aller, nach ihrer Sprach- i 
verwandtschaft geord- | neten, Volker 
des Erdballs, und ihre Vertheilung in 
die Reiche und Staaten | der alten wie i 
der neiien Welt abgebildet und versimi- ! 
licht worden 1st. | Ein Versuch | von | 
D r Heinrich Berghaus. | 

Verlag von Justus Pert-lies inGotha. ; 
| 1852. ^ 

Title of the series (Dr. Heinrich Berghaus | 
physikalischer Atlas, etc.) verso 1. 1 recto blank, , 
title as above verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-68, 19 j 
maps, folio. 

No. 17. "Oregon- Volker treats of the hah- i 
itat and linguistic relations of the peoples of j 
that region, among others the Tshinuk and its 
dialects, p. 56. Map no. 17 is entitled : Ethno- j 
graphische Karte von Nordamerika" Nach 
Alb. Gallatin, A. von Humboldt, Clavigero, 
Hervas, Hale, Isbester, <fcc." 

Copies Keen : Bureau of Ethnology. 

Bergholtz (Gustaf Fredrik). The Lord s j 
Prayer | in the | Principal Languages, : 
Dialects and | Versions of the World, | j 
printed in | Type and Vernaculars of j 
the | Different Nations, | compiled and i 
published by | G. F. Bergholtz. j 
Chicago, Illinois, | 1884. 
Title verso copyright 1 1. contents pp. 3-7, ; 
preface p. 9. text pp. 11-200, 12. 

The Lord s prayer in a number of American 
languages, among them the Chinook, p. 36. 

Copies seen : Congress. 
Bible history : 

Chinook Jargon See Le Jeune (J. M. K.) 

Chinook Jargon St. Onge (L. N.) 

Bible stories : 

Chinook Jargon See Le Jeune (J. M. R.) 

[Blanchet (Et. Kev. Francis Norbert).] 
A Complete Dictionary of the Chinook 
Jargon (English-Chinook and Chinook- 
English) ; to which are added numerous 
Conversations, thereby enabling any 
person to speak the Chinook correctly. 
Third edition, published by S. J. 
M Cormick. 

Portland, O. T. 1856. (*) 

24 pp. 24. Title from Triibner s Bibliograph 
ical Guide to American Literature (1859), p. 249. 
I put this and following titles under this 
author s name upon information furnished by 
Mr. J. K. Gill, the compiler of he editions sub 
sequent to the seventh,, , 



Blanchet (F. N.) Continued. 

[ ] A Complete Dictionary of the 

Chinook Jargon. English-Chinook, and 
Chinook-English. To which is added 
numerous conversations, &c. Third 
edition . 

Portland, Oregon : published by S. 
J. McConnick. [1862?] (*) 

24 pp. 24. The above title, omitting the 
date, is from Gibbs s Dictionary of the Chinook 
Jargon, where he says: "Several editions of 
this work have been published; the last which 
I have seen, in 1862." 

[ ] Dictionary | of the | Chinook Jar 
gon, | to which is added | numerous 
conversations, | thereby enabling any 
person to | speak Chinook correctly. | 
Fourth Edition. | 

Portland, Oregon: | published by S. 
J. McConnick. | Franklin book store, 
Front-st. | 1868. 

Cover title as above, inside title as above 
verso name of printer 1 1. preface and rules for 
pronunciation p. [3], text pp. 4-21. 18. 

Vocabulary, part I. English and Chinook 
(alphabetically arranged, double columns), pp. 
4-13. Numerals 1-1000, p. 13. Vocabulary, 
part I. [sic] --Chinook and English (alphabet 
ically arranged, double columns), pp. 14-18. 
Conversations (English and Chinook, parallel 
columns), pp. 19-21. 

Copies seen : Eames. 

[ ] Dictionary | of the | Chinook Jar 
gon, | to which is added | Numerous 
Conversations, | thereby enabling any 
person to | speak Chinook correctly. | 
Sixth edition. | 

Portland, Oregon : | published by S. 
J. M Cormick, 19 First st. | Franklin 
bookstore. [1873?] 

Cover title as above verso advertisement, 
title as above verso preface and rule for pro 
nunciation 1 1. text pp. 3-24, 24. 

Vocabulary. Part first. English-Chinook, 
(alphabetically arranged, double columns), pp. 
3-15. Numerals, p. 15. Part second. Chinook 
and English (alphabetically arranged, double 
columns), pp. 16-21. Conversations, English- 
Chinook, pp. 22-24. Lord s prayer in Jargon, 
with interlinear English translation, p. 24. 

Copies seen : Ford. 

[ ] Dictionary | of the | Chinook Jar 
gon | to which is added | numerous 
conversations, | thereby enabling any 
person | to speak Chinook correctly. | 
Sixth edition. | 

Portland, Oregon: | F. L. McCor- 
mick, publisher, 63 First street. | 1878, 

Title verso preface 1 1. text pp. 3-26, 24, 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



Blaiichet (P. N.) Continued. 

English-Chinook vocabulary, pp. 3-10. 
Chinook-English vocabulary, pp. 17-23. Con 
versations iu English-Chinook, pp. 24-26. 
Lord s prayer in Jargon, p. 26. 

Copies seen : Bancroft. 

[ ] Dictionary | of the | Chinook Jar 
gon, | to which is added | numerous 
conversations, | thereby enabling any 
person | to speak Chinook correctly. | 
Seventh edition. | 

Port! and, Oregon. | F. L. McCormiek, 
publisher, 91 Second street, j 1879. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso pref 
ace 1 1. text pp. 3-26, 24. 

English-Chinook vocabulary, pp. 3-16. 
Chinook-English vocabulary, pp. 17-23. Con 
versations in English-Chinook, pp. 24-26. 
Lord s prayer in Jargon, p. 26. 

Copies seen : Congress, Georgetown. Welles- 
ley. 

For later editions, see Gill (J. K.) 

[Writings in the Chinook Jargon.] 

In the preface to the Chinook Dictionary, 
&c.. by Father Demers and others, is a state 
ment concerning the origin of the Chinook 
Jargon and those who have written therein, 
from which I make the following extract: 

"The Chinook Jargon was invented by the 
Hudson Bay Company traders, who were mostly 
French-Canadians. Having to trade with the 
numerous tribes inhabiting the countries west 
of the Kooky Mountains, it was necessary to 
have a language understood by all. Hence the 
idea of composing the Chinook Jargon. Fort 
Vancouver being the principal post, the traders 
of the twenty-nine forts belonging to the com 
pany, on the western slope, and the Indians 
from every part of that immense country, had 
to come to Vancouver for the trading season. 
They used to learn tlie Chinook [Jargon], and 
then teach it to others. In this manner, it 
became universally known. 

"The two first missionaries to Oregon, Rev. 
F. N. Blanchet, V. G.. and his worthy com 
panion, Rev. Mod. Demers, arrived from Canada 
to Vancouver, on the 24th of November, 1838. 
They had to instruct numerous tribes of 
Indians, and the wives and children of the 
whites, who spoke only the Chinook. The two 
missionaries set to work to learn it, and in a 
few weeks Father Demers had mastered it, 
and began to preach. 

He composed a vocabulary which was very 
useful to other missionaries. He composed 
several canticles which the Indians learned and 
sang with taste and delight. He also translated 
all the Christian prayers in the same language, 

"Such is the origin of the Chinook Jargon, 
which enabled the two first missionaries in the 
country to do a great deal of good among the 
Indians and half-breeds. The invention of the 
Catholic-Ladder, in April, 1839, by Very Rev. 
Blanchet, and its (oral) explanation in Chinook, 



Blanchet (F. N.) Continued. 

had a marvelous success, and gave the Catholic 
missionaries a great superiority and preponder 
ance much envied by the missionaries belong 
ing to other denominations. 

"Father Demers, afterwards Bishop of Van 
couver s Island, has now gone to enjoy the 
reward of his great labours and apostolic zeal. 
It would be too bad to lose his dictionary and 
other Chinook works. So Archbishop Blan 
chet, who has himself made a compendium of 
the Christian Doctrine in the same language, has 
had the good inspiration to get the whole pub 
lished with his corrections and additions." St. 
Onge,in Demers Chinook Dictionary . 

Referring to the Catholic Ladder, " and its 
explanation in Chinook," mentioned in the 
above extract, Father St. Onge writes rue as 
follows: "The Catholic Ladder, of which I 
sent you a copy, was, as you suggest, published 
by Father Lacombe ; but it is only an embel 
lished edition of the Ladder invented by Arch 
bishop Blanchet, in April, 1839. The arch 
bishop never printed any Chinook explanation 
of it, and in my preface to the Chinook Diction 
ary the word oral should have been inserted." 
See Demers (M.), Blanchet (F. N.) 
and St. Onge(L.N.) 

Bishop Blanchet was born at St. Pierre, 
Riviere-du-Sud, Quebec, Canada, September 5, 
1795; was educated in the Petit Semiuaire, 
Quebec, and was ordained July 18, 1819, by 
Archbishop Plessis. In 1811 the Pacific Fur 
Company established a trading post, called 
Astoria, at the mouth of the Columbia River. 
After came the Hudson s Bay Company, em 
ploying many Canadians, most of whom were 
Catholics. Many of them settled and inter 
married with the Indians of the territory, and 
with these there was a demand for Catholic 
priests and Catholic worship. 

Application was first made to the Rt. Rev. 
J. N. Provencher, Bishop of Juliopolie (Red 
River). The demand for Catholic priests was 
earnestly indorsed by Sir George Simpson, 
governor of the Hudson Bay Company, 
writing from the British capital (1838). He 
applied to the Mt. Rev. Joseph Siguay, then 
Archbishop of Quebec. At once, in April, 
1838, Bishop Signay instructed two of his 
missionaries, the Very Rev. F. N. Blanchet and 
the Rev. Modeste Demers, to take chargeof the 
mission "situated between the Pacific Ocean 
and the Rocky Mountains" a mighty charge 
for two men ; but the men were apostles, and, 
therefore, as full of practical zeal as of prac 
tical faith. Father Blanchet was vicar-general, 
with Father Demers as assistant. 

The journey of the devoted missionaries to 
their new mission was along and most laborious 
one, familiar enough in early Catholic American 
history, though almost incomprehensible to us 
in these days of rapid and easy transit. They 
labored on their route, baptizing and confirming 
in the faith many Indians, who, at various 
forts, thronged to meet the loug-looked-forWac* 



6 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Blanchet (F. N.) Continued. 

gowns. Their destination was Fort Vancouver, 
which they reached November 24, 1838. 

Vancouver was at this time, the principal fort 
of the Hudson Buy Company, and this the 
missionaries made their headquarters while for 
four years they toiled unaided up and down ! 
the wide domain of their mission. The letters 
of the fathers describing their work and sur- I 
rouudings are full of interest and atford valu 
able material for history. They learned the 
Indian tongue and taught the natives the sim 
ple prayers and doctrines of the church in their 
own language ; Father Deniers attending more 
to the Indians, and Father Blauchet to the 
Canadians. 

With the rapid growth of the missions the 
Holy See, at the request of the Bishops of 
Quebec and Baltimore, erected Oregon into a 
vicariate-apostolic (December 1, 1843), appoint 
ing Father Blanchet its vicar-apostolic. The 
papal briefs arrived on November 4, and Father 
Blanchet, setting out for Canada, received his 
consecration in Montreal at the hands of the 
Archbishop of Quebec. Thence he went to 
Rome, which he reached in January, 1840, and 
set before the Pope the great wants of his 
vicariate. 

At his intercession, in July, 1846, after the 
accession of Pius IX., the vicariate of Oregon 
was erected into an ecclesiastical province, 
with the three sees of Oregon City, Walla 
Walla (now Wallula), and Vancouver s Island. 
The Kt. Rev. F. N. Blanchet was appointed to 
Oregon City ; the Rt. Rev. A. M. A. Blanchet, 
his brother, to Walla Walla, and the Rt. Rev. 
M. Demers to Vancouver Island. The neces 
sity of this division may be judged from the 
result of the missionaries labors at the end of 
1844. Most of the Indian tribes of the Sound, 
Caledonia, and several of the Rocky Mountains 
and of Lower Oregon, had been won over to the 
faith. Nine missions hud been founded five 
in Lower Oregon and four at the Rocky Moun 
tains. Eleven churches and chapels had been 
erected five in Lower Oregon, two in Cale 
donia, and four at the Rocky Mountains. There 
were two educational establishments one for 
boys and the other for girls. There were ti fteen 
priests, secular and regular, besides the sisters. 
These figures may not look large to-day, but 
they were large at the time, and of great signif 
icance in a rapidly populating and growing 
region. 

Meanwhile the archbishop of Oregon City 
had been very active abroad in aid of his new 
province and its dioceses. He sought help on 
all sides, and returned in August, 1847, accom 
panied by a colony of twenty persons, compris 
ing seven sisters of Notre Dame de Namur. 
three Jesuit fathers, three lay brothers, five 
secular priests, two deacons, and one cleric. 

In 1855 the archbishop started for South 
America to collect for his needy diocese. He 
traversed Chile, Bolivia, and Peru, returning in 
1857 after a successful expedition. Two years 
later he departed for Canada, returning the 



Blanchet (F. N.) Continued. 

same year with twelve sisters of the Holy 
Names of Jesus and Mary for Portland, two 
Sisters of St. Ann for Victoria, some others for 
Vancouver, and three priests. 

In 1866 the archbishop attended the second 
Plenary Council of Baltimore, and, ever watch 
ful for the cares of his diocese, returned with 
one priest and eight sisters. On July 18, 1869, 
he celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of his 
ordination to the priesthood, and four months 
later left for Rome to assist at the Vatican 
council, where he met his early brother mis 
sionaries. He returned to Portland in 1870. 

On July 1, 1879, Archbishop Seghers, the 
coad, jutor, arrived at Portland, and was received 
by the venerable founder of the diocese, sur 
rounded by his clergy and faithful flock. In a 
few words of touching simplicity and sweetness 
the aged prelate received and welcomed his 
youthful colaborer to the field where he had 
planted and sowed and reaped so well. After 
initiating Archbishop Seghers into the work of 
the diocese, the venerable man chose wholly to 
retire from the scene of his active labors, and 
published his farewell pastoral on the 27th day 
of February, 1881. Mallet. 

Boas (Dr. Franz). Chinook [Jargon] 
songs. 

In Journal of Am. Folk-lore, vol. 1, pp. 220- 
226, Boston and New York, 1888, 8. (Pilling.) 

Thirty-eight songs, one verse each, with 
English translation, pp. 221-224. Three songs 
with music, p. 225. One song in Chinook, 
except the last line, which is in Tlingit, p. 225. 
Glossary of Chinook words (74), alphabetically 
arranged, pp. 225-226. 

Notes on the Chinook language. By 
Fran/ Boas. 

In American Anthropologist, vol. 6, pp. 55-63, 
Washington, 1893. 8. (Pilling.) 

Tribal divisions, p. 55. Characters used to 
render the sounds of the Chinook language, pp. 

55-56. Discussion of the language, p. 57. 

Genders, with examples, pp. 57-58. Plurals, 
with examples, pp. 58-59. Cases, with exam 
ples, pp. 59-60. Numerals, p. 60. Verbs, pp. 
00-02. Word composition, pp. 62-63. 

[Myths, legends, and texts in the 
Chinookau languages.] 

Manuscripts, four note books, sm. 4 ; in tlie 
library of the Bureau of Ethnology. 

Note book no. 1. Texts, etc., in the Chinook 
dialect: Cikla, a creation myth, p. 1 ; Ckulkulotl, 
the salmon spear, p. 15; The panther and the 
stick, p. 26. Wasko text : Coyote ana eagle, p. 
32. Clackamas text, p. 33. Katiamat texts: 
Ak asqenfiqena, p. 34; The floou. p. 48; Tiape- 
qoqot. p. 54. Clatsop vocabulary, pp. 68-91, 

Note book no. 2. Explanation of Chinook 
texts, pp. 1-19. Sentences and vocabulary, 
Chinook dialect, pp. 19-33. Explanation of 
Katiamat texts, pp. 33-57. Clackamas vocabu 
lary, pp. 1-11. Wasko vocabulary, pp. l-ll. 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



Boas (F.) Continued. 

Note book no. 3. Chinook texts with inter 
linear translations left-hand pages, grammatic 
and lexicographic explanations on right-hand 
pages: Cikla, concluded, p. 34; Okula m, p 38; 
Entsq, p. 58 ; Crow and eagle, p. 70 ; The child of 
the West Wind, p. 75; Caqatl, p. 105; The 
salmon, p. 113; Cnstoms referring to war, p. 
145; War bet ween the Kwileyut and Clatsop, 
p. 14G ; The first visit of a ship, p. 150 ; The sea- 
lion hunters, p. 155 ; Raven and gull, p. 170 ; The 
skunk, p. 174; Blue.jay and his sister go visit 
ing (1), p. 180: Marriage, p. 193; Blue.jay and 
robin, p. 197 ; Marriage, continued, p. 201 ; Blue- 
jay and his sister (2), p. 203; Bluejay and his 
sister (3), p. 214; Souls and Shamans, p. 228; 
Adolescence of girls, p. 262; Birth, p. 267; Death 
and sickness, p. 269 ; Whaling, p. 282; The elk 
hunter, p. 288 ; The coyote and the salmon, p. 
295; Potlatch, p. 313; Gitla unatlq, p. 318; The 
crane, p. 331. Katlumat texts. Visit to the 
sun, p. 31; The raccoon, p. 40; Coyote and 
badger, p. 55; Panther and lynx, p. 68; Emo- 
goalek,p.76; The seal. p. 87 ; Visit to the world 
of the souls, p. 92 ; Tlgu lak. p. 98 ; The mink, p. 
103; Robin and salmon berry, p. 119; Panther 
and owl, p. 131 ; The coyote, p. 146 ; The famine, 
p. 151. 

Note book no. 4. Chinook explanations of 
texts, pp. 1-19. Notes on Chinook dialect from 
the explanations of the Katlamet texts, pp. 19- 
32. Katlametexplanationsof texts, pp. 33-48. 
Katlama; taken from explanations of Chinook 
texts, pp. 48-54. 

Since the above was put in type I have seen 
a portion of this material in a more advanced 
state of preparation for the press. It still 
requires about one hundred pages to make it 
complete. It is headed as follows : 

Chinook Texts | Told by Charles 

Cultee; | Recorded and translated ) by 
| Franz Boas. 

Manuscript, 11. i-iv, 1-252 folio, written on 
one side only : in possession of its author. 

Introduction, 11. i-ii. [Sounds of] letters, 11. 
iii-iv. Cikla, their myth, with literal inter 
linear translation into English, 11. 1-13; a free 
English translation. 11. 14-20. Okula m, her 
myth, with literal interlinear translation into 
English, 11. 21-33 ; a free English translation, 11. 
34-42. Anektiyo lemiy, her myth, with inter 
linear English translation, 11. 43-59; English 
translation, 11. 59-70. The salmon, his myth, 
with interlinear English translation, 11.72-90; 
English translation. 11. 91-102. Raven and gull, 
their myth, with interlinear English translation, 
11. 104-106; English translation, 11. 107-108. 
Coyote, his myth, with interlinear English 
translation.il. 109-119; English translation, 11. 
119-123. The crane, his myth, with interlinear 
English translation. 11. 125-128; English trans 
lation, 11. 129-130. Enstiy. his myth, with inter 
linear English translation, 11. 131-137; English 
translation, 11. 137-142. The crow, his story, 
with interlinear English translation, 11. 143-145 ; 



Boas (F.) Continued. 

English translation, 11. 145-147. Caxas, his 
myth, with interlinear English translation, 11. 
148-152; English translation, 152-155. Stikua, 
her myth, with interlinear English translation, 
11. 156-164; English translation. 11. 164-168. The 
skunk, his story, with interlinear Englishtrans- 
lation, 11. 169-172; Englishtranslation,!!. 172-173. 
Robin, their myth, and Bluejays, with inter 
linear English translation, 11. 175-177; English 
translation, 11. 178 -179. Bluejay and loi, their 
myth (1), with interlinear Englishtranslation, 11. 
180-186; English translation, 11. 186-190. The 
same (2). 11.191-199, 199-202. The same (3), 11. 
203-215 (11. 209-214 missing). LI. 216-235 miss 
ing. The soul, with interlinear English transla 
tion. 11. 236-247 ; English translation, 11. 248-252. 

At the close of each myth will appear explan 
atory notes. 

I copy the following notes from the Intro 
duction : 

The following texts were collected in the 
summers of 1890 and 1 891 . While studying the 
Salishan languages of Washington and Oregon 
I heard that the dialects of the Lower Chinook 
were on the verge of disappearing; that only a 
few individuals of the once powerful tribes of 
the Clatsop and Chinook survived who remem 
bered their languages. This fact determined 
me to make an effort to collect what little 
remained of these languages. I first went to 
Clatsop. where a small band of Indians is 
located near Seaside, Clatsop County, Oregon. 
Although a number of them belonged to the 
Clatsop tribe, they had all adopted the Nehelim 
language, a dialect of the Sulishan Tillamook. 
This change of language was brought about by 
frequent intermarriages with the Nehelim. 1 
found one middle-aged man and two old women 
who still remembered the Clatsop language, 
but I found it impossible to obtain more than a 
vocabulary and a few sentences. The man had 
forgotten too great a part of the language, while 
the women were not able to grasp what I 
wanted. They claimed to have forgotten their 
myths and traditions, and could not or would 
not give me any connected texts. One old 
Clatsop woman, who had been married to a Mr. 
Smith, was too sick to be seen and died soon 
after my visit. The few remaining Clatsop 
had totally forgotten the history of their tribe 
and even maintained that no allied dialect was 
spoken north of Columbia River and on Shoal- 
water Bay. They assured me that the whole 
country was occupied by the Chihalis, another 
Salishan tribe. They told me, however, that a 
few of their relations, who still continued to 
speak Clatsop, lived on Shoal water Bay among 
the Chihalis. I went to search for these people 
and found them located at Bay Center, Pacific 
County, Washington. They proved to be the 
last survivors of the Chinook, who at one time 
occupied the greater part of Shoal water Bay 
and the northern bank of Columbia River as 
far as Grey s Harbor. The tribe has adopted 
the Chihalis language in the same way in which 



8 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Boas (F.) Continued. 

the Clatsop have adopted the Nehelim. The 
only ones who spoke Chinook were Joseph 
Cultee and Katharine. While I was unable to 
obtain anything from the latter, Cnltee proved 
to be a veritable storehouse of information. His 
wife is a Chihalis and he speaks now-a-days 
exclusively Chihalis, which is also the language 
of his children. He lias lived for a long time 
in Katlamat, his mother s town, and speaks for 
this reason the Katlamat dialect as well as the 
Chinook dialect. He uses this dialect in con 
versing with Samson, a Katlamat Indian, who 
is also located at Bay Center. Until a few 
years ago he spoke Chinook with one of his 
relations, while he uses it now only when con 
versing Avith Katharine, who liven a few miles 
from Bay Center. 

Possibly this Chinook is to a certain extent 
mixed with Katlamat expressions, but from a 
close study of the material I have reached the 
conclusion that it is. on the whole, pure and I 
trustworthy. 

I have also obtained from Cultee a series of 
Katlamat texts, which I believe are not quite j 
as good as the Chinook text, but nevertheless 
give a good insight into the differences of the 
two dialects. "It may be possibl > to obtain 
material on this dialect from other sources. 

My work of translating and explaining the 
texts was greatly facilitated by Cultee s remark 
able intelligence. After he had onc,e grasped 
what I wanted lie explained to me the gram 
matical structure of the sentences by means of 
examples and elucidated the sense of difficult 
periods. This work was the more difficult as 
we conversed only by means of the Chinook 
Jargon. 

The following pages contain nothing but the 
texts with notes and translations. The gram- 
maraud dictionary of the language will contain 
acomparisou of all the dialects of the Chinookan 
stock. I have translated the first two texts 
almost verbatim, while in the latter texts I only 
endeavored to render the sense accurately, for j 
which purposes short sentences have been 
inserted, others omitted. 

[Grammar and dictionary of the | 
Chinook language. By Dr. Franz j 
Boas.] (*) 

Manuscript, in possession of its author, who I 
is preparing it for publication. See note above, j 

See Buhner (T. S.) 

Franz Boas was born in Minden, Westphalia, 
Germany, July 9,1858. From 1877 to 1882 lie 
attended the universities of Heidelberg, Bonn, 
and Kiel. The year 1882 he spent in Berlin 
preparing for an Arctic voyage, and sailed 
June, 1883, to Cumberland Sound, Baffin Land, 
traveling in that region until September, 1884, 
returning via St. Johns, Newfoundland, to New | 
York. The winter of 1884-1885 he spent in j 
Washington, preparing the results of his 
journey for publication and in studying in the 



Boas (F.) Continued. 

National Museum. From 1885 to 1880 Dr. Boas 
was an assistant in the Royal Ethnographical 
Museum of Berlin, and Decent of Geography at 
the University of Berlin. In the winter of 1885- 
1886 he journeyed to British Columbia under 
the auspices of the British Association for the 
Advancement of Science, for the purpose of 
studying the Indians. During 1880-1888 Dr. 
Boas was assistant editor of " Science," in New 
York, and from 1888 to 1892 Docent of Anthro 
pology at Clark University, Worcester, Mass. 
During these years lie made repeated journeys 
to the Pacific coast with the, object of contin 
uing his researches among the Indians. I n 1891 
Kiel gave him the degree of Ph. I). 

Dr. Boas s principal writings are: Haffin 
Land, Gotha, Justus Perth es, 1885; The Central 
Eskimo (in the 6th Annual Report of the 
Bureau of Ethnology) ; Reports to the British 
Association for the Advancement of Science on 
the Indians of British Columbia, 1888-1892; 
Volkssageu aus Britisch Columbien, Verh.der 
Ges. fiir Anthropologie, Ethnologic und Urge- 
schichte in Berlin, 1891. 

Bolduc : This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy 
of the work referred to has been seen by the 
compiler in the library of Rev. J.-B. Z, Bolduc, 
Quebec, Canada. 

Bolduc (Pere Jean-Baptiste Zacarie). 
Mission | de la | Colombie. | Lettre et 
journal | de | Mr. . I. -B. Z. Bolduc, | mis- 
siounaire de la Colombie. | [Picture of 
a church.] | 

Quebec: | de 1 imprimerie de J.-B. 
Frechette, pere, | imprimeur-libraire, 
No. 13, rue Lamoiita^ne. [1843.] 

Title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-95. 16. The 
larger part of the edition of this work was 
burned in the printing office, and it is, in con 
sequence, very scarce. 

Lord s prayer in Tchinouc Jargon with inter 
linear French translation, p. 94. Quelquesmots 
[14], French, Tchinoucs [Jargon] et Sneomus, 
p. 95. 

Copies seen : Bolduc, Mallet, Wellesley. 

Boston Athenaeum : These words following a title 
or within parentheses after a note indicate that 
a copy of the w r ork referred to has been seen by 
the compiler in the library of that institution, 
Boston, Mass. 

Boston Public: These words following a title or 
within parentheses after a note indicate that a 
copy of the work referred to lias been seen by 
the compiler in that library, Boston, Mass. 

Boulet (Uev. Jean-Baptiste), editor. See 
Youth s Companion. 

Brinton: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler in the library of Dr. D. G. Brintou, Phila 
delphia, Pa. 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



Brinton (Dr. Daniel Garrison). The lan 
guage of palaeolithic man. 

In American Philosoph. Soc. Proc. vol. 25, pp. 
212-2^5, Philadelphia, 1888, 8. 

Terms for 7, thou, man, divinity, in Chinook, 
p. 216. 

Issued separately as follows : 

The language | of | palaeolithic man. 

| By | Daniel G. Brinton, M. D., j Pro 
fessor of American Linguistics and Ar- 
chsBologyin the University of Pennsyl 
vania. | Read before the American Phil 
osophical Society, | October 5, 1888. j 

Press of MacCalla & co., | Nos. 237-9 
Dock Street, Philadelphia, j 1888. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso blank 
1 1. text pp. 3-16. 8. 

Linguistic contents as under title next 
above, p. 7. 

Copies seen : Eames, Pilling. 

This article reprinted in the following : 

Essays of an Americanist. | I. Eth 
nologic and Archaeologic. | II. Mythol 
ogy and Folk Lore. [ III. Graphic Sys 
tems and Literature. | IV. Linguistic. 

) By | Daniel G. Brinton, A.M., M.D., | 
Professor [&c. nine lines.] | 

Philadelphia: | Porter &. Coates. | 
1890. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. iii-iv, 
contents pp. v-xii, text pp. 17-467, index of 
authors and authorities pp. 469-474, index of 
subjects pp. 475-489, 8. A collected reprint of 
some of Dr. Brinton s more important essays. 

The earliest form of human speech as revealed 
by American tongues (read before the American 
Philosophical Society in 1885 and published in 
their proceedings imder the title of " The lan 
guage of palaeolithic man"), pp. 890-409. 

Linguistic contents as under titles next 
above, p. 401. 

Copies seen : Bureau of Ethnology, Eames, 
Pilling. 

The American Race : | A Linguistic 
Classification and Ethnographic | De 
scription of the Native Tribes of | 
North and South America. | By | Daniel 
G. Brinton, A.M., M.I). , | Professor [&c. 
ten lines.] | 

New York: | N. D. C. Hodges, Pub 
lisher, | 47 Lafayette Place. | 1891. 

Title verso copyright notice 1 1. dedication 
verso blank 1 1. preface pp. ix xii, contents pp. 
xiii-xvi, text pp. 17-332, linguistic appendix pp. 
333-364. additions and corrections pp. 365-368, 
index of authors pp. 369-373. index of subjects 
pp. 374-392, 8 C . 

A brief discussion of the north Pacific coast 
stocks (pp. 103-117) includes a list of the divi 
sions of the Chinook linguistic stock, p. 108. 



Brinton (D. G.) Continued. 

Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Eames, 
Pilling. 

Daniel Garrison Briutoii, ethnologist, born in 
Chester County, Pa., May 13, 1837. He was 
graduated at Yale in 1858 and at the Jetferson 
Medical College in 1861, after which lie spent a 
year in Europe in study and in travel. On his 
return he entered the army, in August, 1862, as 
acting assistant surgeon. In February of the 
following year he was commissioned surgeon 
and served as surgeoii-iu-chief of the second 
division, eleventh corps. He was present at the 
battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and 
other engagements, and was appointed medical 
director of his corps in October, 1863. In conse 
quence of a sunstroke received soon after the 
battle of Gettysburg he was disqualified for 
active service, and in the autumn of that year he 
became superintendent of hospitals at Quincy 
and Springfield, 111., until August, 1865, when, 
the civil war having closed, he was bre vetted 
lieutenant-colonel and discharged. He then 
settled in Philadelphia, where he became editor 
of " The Medical and Surgical Reporter," and 
also of the quarterly "Compendium of Medical 
Science." Dr. Brinton has likewise been a 
constant contributor to other medical journals, 
chiefiy on questions of public medicine and 
hygiene, and has edited several volumes on 
therapeutics and diagnosis, especially the pop 
ular series known as "Xapheys s Modern Ther 
apeutics," which has passed through many 
editious. In the medical controversies of the 
day, he Las always taken the position that med 
ical science should be based on the results of 
clinical observation rather than on physiological 
experiments. He has become prominent as a 
student and a writer on American ethnology, 
hia work in this direction beginning while lie 
was a student in college. The winter of 1856- 57, 
spent in Florida, supplied him with material for 
his first published book on the subject. In 1884 
he was appointed professor of ethnology and 
archaeology in the Academy of Natural Sciences, 
Philadelphia. For some years he has been pres 
ident of the Numismatic and Antiquarian Soci 
ety of Philadelphia, and in 1886 he was elected 
vice-president of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, to preside over 
the section on anthropology. During the same 
year lie was awarded the medal of the " Soci6te 
Americaine de France" for his " numerous and 
learned works on American ethnology," being 
the first native of the United States that has 
been so honored. In 1885 the American pub 
lishers of the " Iconographic Encyclopaedia" 
requested him to edit the first volume, to con 
tribute to it the articles on "Anthropology" 
and "Ethnology, 1 and to revise that on " Eth- 
iiograhy,"by Professor Gerlaiid, of Strpa.sbr.rg. 
He also contributed to the second volume of the 
same work an essay on the "Prehistoric Archae 
ology of both Hemispheres." Dr. Brinton has 
established a library and publishing house of 
aboriginal American literature, for the purpose 



10 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Brinton (D. G.) Continued. 

of placing within the reach of scholars authen 
tic materials for the study of the languages and 
culture of the native races of America. Each 
work is the production of native minds and is 
printed in the original. The series, most of 
which were edited by Dr. Brinton himself, 
includes "The Maya Chronicles" (Philadelphia, 
1882); "The Iroquois Book of Kites" (1883); 
"The Guegiienee: A Comedy Ball* t in the 
Nahuatl Spanish Dialect of Nicaragua" (1883) ; 
"A Migration Legend of the Creek Indians " 
(1884) : " TheLenape and Then-Legends " ( 1885) ; 
"The Annals of the Cakchiquels " (1885). I 
["Ancient Nahuatl Poetry" (1887): " Rig 
Yeda Americanus (1890).] Besides publishing 
numerous papers, he has contributed valuable ! 
reports on his examination of mounds, shell- 
heaps, rock inscriptions, and other antiquities. 
He is the author of " The Floridian Peninsula: 
Its Literary History, Indian Tribes, and Antiq- ; 
uities" (Philadelphia, 1859); " The Myths of j 
the New World : A Treatise on the Symbolism j 
and Mythology of the Red Race of America" 
(New York, 1868) ; " The Religious Sentiment : j 
A Contribution to the Science and Philosophy j 
of Religion" (187(5) "American Hero Myths: 
A Study in the Native Religions of the Western j 
Continent" (Philadelphia, 1882): "Aboriginal j 
American Authors and their Productions, \ 
Especially those in the Native Languages" 
(1883); and "A Grammar of the Cakchiquel ! 
Language of Guatemala" (1884). Appleton s i 
Cyclop, of Am. Bioy. 

British Museum: These words following a title or 
within parentheses after a note indicate that a 
copy of the work referred to has been seen by 
the compiler in the library of that institution. 
London. Eng. 

Bulmer (Dr. Thomas Sanderson). Chi 
nook Jargon | grammar and dictionary 
| compiled by | T. S. Buhner, M.TX, 
C. M., F. S. A., London, | Surgeon- 
Accoucheur, Royal College of Sur 
geons, England. | Author of [&c. four 

lines.] (*) 

Manuscript in possession of its author, Cedar 
City, Utah, who furnished me the above tran 
script of the title-page, and who writes me, 
October, 1891, concerning it as follows : " I shall 
issue it on Hall s typewriter, and then dupli 
cate copies with another special machine, and 
use various types on the machine, testing the 
uses of each. . . . Fifty pages will be 
devoted to the origin of the language from all 
sources. Examples of hymns from various 
languages Avill be given. 

Chinook Jargon language. | Part II. 

| [Two lines Chinook Jargon.] | To be 
completed in IX parts. | compiled by | 
T. S. Bulmer, M. D., C. M., F. S. A. Sc. 
A., London. | Ably assisted by | Rev d 
M. Eells, D. D., and Rev d Pere N. L. 



Bulmer (T. S.) Continued. 

St. Onge, (formerly missionary to the 
| Yakama Indians). 

Manuscript ; title as above verso blank 1 1. 
text 11. 1-124, 4. In possession of Dr. Bulmer. 
Preface in English, 11. 1-3; in Jargon, with 
interlinear English translation, 11. 4-12. 
Eulogy of the Chinook Jargon, in English, 11. 
13-15; in Jargon (with interlinear translation 
into English) by Mr. Eells, 11. 10-19. The 
Chinook Jargon (general remarks, with inter 
linear English trauslatioiD.il. 20-22. Special 
notes on the Chinook, 11. 23-21. Bibliography 
of the Chinook Jargon, 11. 24rt-24&. Origin of 
certain Indian words, 1. 25. Remarks on ono 
matopoeia. 11. 26-27. Rise and progress of the 
written language of the Chinook Jargon, 1. 28. 
Changes in the language, with vocabulary, 11. 
J8-35. Some words in Yakama, with a resem 
blance to the Jargon, 11. 36 -40. Words in the 
Niskwalli having some resemblance to the 
Chinook Jargon, 1. 41. Some words from the 
Cree. 1. 42. A list of verbs found iu the Jar 
gon, alphabetically arranged, 1. 42. Adverbs, 
prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections, 
11. 51-54. List of the principal adjectives, 11. 55- 
59. Grammatical construction of the Chinook 
Jargon. 11. 61-03. Comparison of languages (20 
words and phrases) in Tlaoquatch audNootka, 
with the Columbian and Chinook, 11. 63i-64. 
Cree wordsin the Jargon, 11. 05-74. On the posi 
tion of words, 1. 75. Remarks on the translation 
of abstract words, 11. 76-79. The alphabet, 11. 
80-85. Partial list of compound words, alpha 
betically arranged, 11. 86-92. Inflections*. 11. 93- 
96 Adjectives, 11. 90-98. General rules on 
lenses, 11. 98-112. Personal pronouns, 11. 113- 
122. Numerals. 11. 123-124. 

The Chee-Chiuook language | or j 

Chinook Jargon. In | IX | parts. | Part 
III. | English-Chinook dictionary. [ 
First edition. | By T. S. Bulmer, ably 
assisted by \ the Kevd. M. Eells, D.D., 
& the Revd Pere Saint Ouge, both 
missionaries to the Indians in Wash 
ington &. Oregon states. 

Manuscript; title verso blank. 1 1. preface 
verso blank 1 1. special note for readers verso 
blank 1 1. "memos to guide the reader " 2 11. text 
alphabetically arranged by English words 11. 
1-189, written on one side only, folio. In posses 
sion of its author, who kindly loaned it to me 
for examination. In his "memos" the author 
gives a list of letters used to indicate the origin 
of the respective words C, Y, 1, E,F, Ch. Yak., 
Chinook, Nootka, Indian, English, French, Chi- 
halis, and Yakama; and a second list of per 
sons from whom the words were obtained and 
localities in which they were used. 

"In my selection of the term Cliec-Cldnook 
I merely intend to convey to students that it- 
has its principal origin in the Old or Original 
Chinook language ; and although it contains 
main other Indian words, as well as French 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



11 



Bulmer (T. S.) Continued. 

and English, yet it came forth from its mother 
as an hybrid, and as such has been bred and 
nourished as a nursling from the parent stem . 
I there fore designate it a chee or new Chinook 
the word chee being a Jargon word for lately, 
just now, ne.tr." 

[ ] Chinook Jargon dictionary. Part 

III. Chinook-Pjiiglish. 

Manuscript; 121 leaves, folio, written on one 
side only, interspersed with 40 blank leaves 
inserted for additions and corrections. In 
possession of its author. 

The dictionary occupies 106 leaves, and many 
of the words are followed by their equivalents 
in the languages from which they are derived, 
and the authority therefor. Following the 
dictionary are the following: Original Indian 
names of town-sites, rivers, mountains, etc.. in 
the western parts of the State of Washington: 
Skokomish, J 11. ; Chemakum, Lower Chihalis, 
Duwamish, 1 1. ; Chinook, 2 11. ; miscellaneous, 2 
11. Names of various places in the Klamath 
and Modoc countries, 3 11. Camping places 
and other localities around the Upper Klamath j 
Lake, 5 11. 

[ ] Appendix to Buhner s Chinook 

Jargon grammar and dictionary. 

Manuscript, 11. 1-70, 4, in possession of its j 
author. 

General phrases, as literal as possible, 
Chinook and English, 11. 6-26. Detached sen- | 
tences, 11. 27-29. Prayer in English, 11. 30-31; 
same in Jargon, 11. 32-33. "History " in Eng- j 
lish, 11.34-36; same in Jargon (by Mr. Eells), 
with interlinear English translation, 11. 37-43. 
An address, in English, 11. 44-46; same in Jar- j 
gon, with interlinear English translation, 11. 47- j 
53. A sermon in English, 11. 54-55; same in 
Jargon, with interlinear English translation, 11. 
56-61 .Address in Jargon to the Indians of 
Puget Sound, by Mr. Eells, with interlinear 
English translation, 11. 62-66. Address "On 
Man," in English, 1. 67; same in Jargon, with 
interlinear English translation, 11. 68-70. 

[ j Part II | of | Buliuer s Appendix | 

to the Chee-Chiuook | Grammar and 
Dictionary. 

Manuscript, 57 11. 4, in possession of its 
author. 

Form of marriage, 11. 2-3. Solemnization of 
the marriage service, 11. 4-10. These two articles 
are in Jargon, with interlinear English transla 
tion. Address, in English, 11. 11-12; the same 
in Jargon, with interlinear English translation, 
11. 13-17. "From Addison," in Jargon, with 
interlinear English translation, 11. 18-19. An 
oration in English, 1. 20 ; the same in Twana by 
Mr. Eells, with interlinear English translation, 
11. 21-22. A Twana tradition, by Mr. Eells, 
with interlinear English translation, 1. 23; the 
same in English, 11. 24-25. Legends in Jargon, 
by Pere L. 1ST. St. Onge, with interlinear English 
translation, 11. 26-57. 



Bulmer (T. S.) Continued. 

[ ] Special scientific notes. 

Manuscript, 11. 1-77,4. in possession of its 
author. 

General remarks on Indian languages, 11. 1- 
3. Origin of languages, 11. 4-11. Scientific 
notes on the European and Asiatic languages, 
11. 12-35. American Indian languages, 11. 35- 
63. includes remarks upon and examples in the 
Iroquois, Cherokee, Sahaptin, Algonkin, 
Nahuatl, Shoshone, Cree, Sioux, and Jargon. 
List of words in the Chinook Jargon the same 
as in Nitlakapamuk, 11. 64-67. Selish numerals 
1-18, 1. 65. List of tribes of Alaska and its 
neighborhood, 1. 66. Twana verbs, 1. 67. Nisk- 
wally verbs, 1. 68. Clallam verbs, 1. 69. Re 
marks on the Yakama, 11. 70-77. 

[ ] The Christian prayers | in Chi 
nook [Jargon]. 

Manuscript; 61 11. 4, in the possession of its 
author. 

Prayers in Chinook Jargon, 11. 1-5. Lessons 
1-17 in Chinook Jargon, with English headings, 
11. 6-23. List of special words adopted by 
Fathers Blauchet and Demers in connection 
with the service of the mass, 11. 24-25. Trans 
lation of. the Chinook prayers into English, 11. 
26-38. Copy of a sermon preached by Rev. Dr. 
Eells to the Indians at Walla- Walla, with inter 
linear English translation, 11. 39-46. "Of the 
97 words used, 46 are of Chinook origin, 17 
Nootka, 3 Selish, 23 English, 2 Jargon, and 6 in 
French. Articles of faith of the Congrega- 
, tional church at Skokomish, Washington, in 
the Jargon with interlinear English translation, 
11. 47-52. Oration in Chinook Jargon with in 
terlinear English translation, 11. 53-54. Prayers 
to God in English blank verse, 11. 55-56; the 
same in Jargon with interlinear English trans 
lation, 11. 57-61. 

[Hymns, songs, etc., in the Chinook 
Jargon and other languages.] 

Manuscript; no title-page; text 77 leaves, 
4, in possession of its author. 

Songs, 1. 1. Song with music, 11. 2-3. School 
songs by Mr. Eells, 11. 4-5. Songs from Dr. 
Boas, 11. 6-12. Hymns by Mr. Eells, 11. 13-32. 
All the above are in Jargon with English 
translations. Hymns in Niskwalli by Mr. 
Eells, 1. 33. Hymns in Jargon by Pere St. 
Ouge, 11. 34-45. Hymn in Yakama, by Pere St. 
Onge, 11. 45-46; the same in English, 11. 57-64. 
Yakama prose song by Father Pandosy, witli 
French translation, 11. 65-69. Hymns in Jargon 
by Mr. Eells, 11. 70-71. Hymn in Yakama with 
interlinear English translation, 11. 72-73. Song 
in English, 1. 74 ; same in Siwash, 11. 75-77. 

[The Lord s prayer in various Indian 

languages.] 

Manuscript; no title-page; text 24 unnum 
bered leaves, written on one side only, 4. 

The Lord s prayer in Chinook Jargon, 1. 1 ; in 
Yakama, * 1. 2; in Micmac, 1. 3. Ave Maria in 
Micmac.l. 3. Lord s prayeriu Penobscot, 1. 4; 



12 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Bulmer (T. S. ) Continued. 

in Mareschite, 1. 5 ; in Passamaq noddy (two ver 
sions)!. 5; Micmac (ancient),!. 6 ; Montagnais, 
1, 6 ; Abenaki, 11. 6-7; pure Mareschite, 1. 7; 
Snohomish, 1. 7 ; Niskwalli, * 1. 8 ; Clallaru,*1.9 ; 
Twana,* 1. 10 ; Sioux, 1. 11 ; Flathead,* 1. 12 ; Cas 
cade, *1. 12; Tlallam, 1. 13 ; Huron, 1. 13; Black- 
toot, 1. 13 ; Abenaki, 1. 14 ; Choctaw, 1. 14 ; Ottawa, 
1.14; Assiniboine, 1. 15; Seneca, 1.15; Canghna- 
waga, 1. 15 ; other Micmac, 1. 16 ; Totonac, 1. 16 ; 
Cora, 1. 16 ; Mistek, * 1. 17 ; Maya, * 1. 17 ; Algon 
quin, * 1. 22. Hymn in Suohomish, 11. 23-24. 

Those prayers marked with an asterisk are 
accompanied by an interlinear English trans 
lation. 

The compiler of this paper informs me it is 
his intention to add one hundred other versions 
of the Lord s prayer, from the California!! and 
Mexican languages. 

In addition to the above papers, Dr. Bulmer is 
also the author of a number of articles appear 
ing in Father Le Jeune s Kamloops Waa<a, q. v. 

1 am indebted to Dr. Bulmer for the notes 
upon which is based the following account: 

Thomas SandersouBulinerwasborninl834, in 
Yorkshire, England. He was educated at Pres 
ton grammar school, Stokesley, and at Newton 
under Brow, was advanced under Rev. C. Cator 
and Lord Beresford s son at Stokesley, and 
afterwards was admitted a pupil of the York 
and Ripon diocesan college. He was appointed 
principal of Doncaster union agricultural 
schools, but soon after emigrated to New York. 
There he took charge, as head master, of Gen 
eral Hamilton s free school. Thence he we-nt 
to Upper Canada and was appointed one of the 
professors in L Assomption Jesuit College. 
From there he went to Rush Medical College 
and Lind University, Chicago; thence to the 
ficole Normale, Montreal; thence to Toronto 
University, medical department. Later he con 
tinued his studies in the iScole de Medecine 
and McGill University, Montreal, and gradu 
ated in medicine at Victoria University. In 
1868 he crossed to London, whence he proceeded 
to New Zealand, and was appointed superin 
tendent of quarantine at Wellington. In Tas 
mania and Australia he held similar positions. 
His health failing, he went to Egypt, and later 
returned to England. The English climate not 
agreeing with him, he took a tour of the Med 
iterranean ports. Returning to London, the 
Russian grippe attacked him, and he was 
warned to seek a new climate. He returned to 
Montreal, en route for the Rocky Mountains, 
where he sought Indian society for a consider 
able time. Finding winter disastrous to him, 
he proceeded to Utah in search of health. For 
the last two years he has been engaged in 
writing up his Chinook books, as well as com 
pleting his Egyptian Rites and Ceremonies, in 
which he has been assisted by English Egyp 
tologists. Dr. Bulmer is a member of several 
societies in England and America and the author 
of a number of works on medical and scientific 
subjects. 



Bureau of Ethnology : These words following a 
title or within parentheses after a note indicate 
that a copy of the work referred to has been seen 
by the compiler in the library of the Bureau of 
Ethnology, Washington, D. C. 

Buschniann (Johaim Carl Eduard). 
Die Volker mid Spracheii Neu-Mex- 
iko s und der Westseite des britisohen 
Nordamefika s, dargestellt YOU Hru. 
Buschmann. 

In Konigliche Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin, 
Abhandlungeu, aus dem Jahre 1857, pp. 209-414, 
Berlin, 1858, 4. 

A few words of Chinook and Cathlascou 
(from Sconler), pp. 373-374. Vocabulary of sev 
eral Indian languages compared Avith the 
pseudo-Chinook (Cathlascon?) from Scouler, 
pp. 375-378. 

Issued separately with title-page as follows: 

Die Volker und Spracheii | Neu- 
Mexico s | imd | der Westseite | des | 
britischen Nordainerika s | dargestellt 
| von | Job. Carl Ed. Busckinanii. | Aus 
den Abhandlungen der konigl. Akade- 
mie der Wissenscbaften | zn Berlin 
1857. | 

Berlin | gedruckt in der Bucbdruck- 
ereidcr konigl. Akadeniie | derWissen- 
sebaften | 1858. | In Commission bei F. 
Diimmler s Verlags-Bucbhandlung. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso 
notice 1 1. text pp. 209-404, Inhalts-Ubersicht 
pp. 405-413, Verbesseruugen p. 414, 4. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 

Copies seen : Astor, Congress, Eames, Pilling, 
Trumbull. 

The copy at the Fischer sale, catalogue no. 
270, brought 14s. ; at the Field sale, catalogue 
no. 235, 75 cents; priced by Leclerc, 1878 no. 
3012, 12 fr. and by Triibuer, 1882, 15*. 

Die Spuren der aztekischeu Spracbe 
im uordlicbeii Mexico und hoheren 
amerikaniscbeu Norden. Zugleicb eine 
Musterung der Volker und Spracbeu des 
nordlieben Mexico s uud der Westseite 
Nordamerika s von Guadalaxara an bis 
zum Eisrneer. Von Job. Carl Ed. Buseb- 
luaiin. 

Jn Konigliche Akad. der Wiss. zu Berlin, A b- 
haudlungeu aus dem Jahre 1854, zweiter Supp.- 
Band, pp. 1-819 (forms the whole volume), Ber 
lin, 1859, 4. 

List of words in the Waiilatpa, Molele,Wat- 
lala, two dialects of the Chinook, and Calapuya, 
pp. 620-625. Supplementary vocabulary of the 
Chiu.uk and Calapuya (from Parker, Scouler, 
Rah uesque, and Gallatin), pp. 625-626. Lord s 
prayer in Chinook (from Dunot de Mofras),p. 
6_>6. 

Issued separately with title-page as follows: 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



13 



Buschmami (J. 0. E.) Continued. 

Die | SpurenderaztekischenSprache 

| iin nordlicheu Mexico | und hoheren 
amerikanisclien Norden. | Zugleich | 
eine Musterung der Volker und. Spra- 
chen | des nordlichen Mexico s | und 
derWestseiteNordamerika a | vonGua- 
dalaxara an bis /urn Eismeer. | Von | 
Joh. Carl Ed. Buschmann. | 

Berlin. | Gedruckt inder Buchdruck- 
ereiderKonigl. Akademie | derWissen- 
schafteu. | 1859. 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. general title of the 
series verso blank 1 1. title as above verso blank 
1 1. abgekiirtze InhaltB-ubersicht pp. vii-xii, 



Buschmann (J. C. E.) Continued. 

text pp. 1-713, Einleitung in das geographische 
Register pp. 714-718, geographiscbe Register 
pp. 718 815. vermischteNachweisungenpp. 816- 
818, Verbesserungen, p. 819, 4. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 

Copies seen : Astor, Brinton, Eames, Maison- 
neuve, Pilling, Quaritch, Smithsonian, Trum- 
bull. 

Published at 20 Marks. An uncut half-mo 
rocco copy was sold at the Fischer sale, cata 
logue no. 269, to Quaritch, for 11. 11*. ; the latter 
prices two copies, catalogue no. 12552, one 21. 2s. 
the other 21. 10*. ; thePinart copy, catalogue no. 
178, brought 9 fr. ; Koehler, catalogue no. 440, 
prices it 13 M. 50 pf. ; priced again by Quaritch, 
no. 30037, 21. 



C. 



See Lee (T).) and Frost (J. H.) 
Lee (IX) and Frost (J. H.) 
Youth s. 
Lee (D.) and Frost (J. H.) 



Cascade: 

Hymns 

Sentences 

Lord s prayer 

Prayer 
Catechism: 

Chinook Jargon See Demers (M.) et al. 

Cathlascon : 

Vocabulary See Buschmann (J. C. E.) 

Vocabulary Scoulcr (J.) 

Vocabulary Tolmie (W. F.) 

Words Buschmann (J. C. E.) 

Words Latham (R. G.) 

Catlin (George), A descriptive cata 
logue | of | Catlin s Indian collection, 
| containing | portraits, landscapes, 
costumes, &c v | and | representations 
of the manners and customs | of the | 
North American Indians. | Collected 
and painted entirely by Mr. Catlin, 
during eight years travel amongst | 
forty-eight tribes, mostly speaking 
different languages. | Also | opinions of 
the press in England, France, and the 
United States. | 

London: | published by the author, | 
at his Indian collection, No. 6, Water 
loo place. | 1848. 

Title verso names of printers 1 1. note and 
certificates pp. 3-7, text pp. 8-92, 8. 

Proper names of a number of individuals in 
various North American languages, among 
them a few of the Chinook. 

Copies seen : Harvard, Wellesley. 

Priced by Maisonneuve & co. in 1889, 2 fr. 

The descriptive catalogue is reprinted in the 
various editions of Catlin s Notes of eight years 
travel and residence in Europe, for titles of 
whieh see below. 

- North and South American Indians. 

| patalogue j descriptive and instruc- 



Catliii (G.) Continued, 
tive | of | Catlin s | Indian Cartoons, j 
Portraits, types, and customs [sic]. | 
600 paintings in oil, | with | 20,000 full 
length figures | illustrating their vari 
ous games, religious ceremonies, and 
| other customs, | and | 27 canvas 
paintings | of | Lasalle s discoveries. | 
New York : | Baker & Godwin, Print 
ers, | Printing-house square, | 1871. 

Abridged title on cover, title as above verso 
blank 1 1. remarks verso note 1 1. text pp. 5-92, 
certificates pp. 93-99, 8. 

Linguistic contents as in edition of 1848, 
titled next above. 

Copies seen : Astor, Congress, Eames, Wel 
lesley, Wisconsin Historical Society. 

The Catlin Indian collection, contain 
ing portraits, landscapes, costumes, 
&c.,and representations of the manners 
and customs of the North American 
Indians. Presented to the Smithsonian 
Institution by Mrs. Thomas Harrison, 
of Philadelphia, in 1879. A descriptive 
catalogue. By George Catlin, the artist. 

In Rhees(W. J.), Visitor s guide to the Smith 
sonian Institution and United States National 
Museum, in Washington, pp. 70-89, Washiug- 
ton, 1887,8. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above, 
p. 70. 

Copies seen ; Pilling, Powell. 

Part V. The George Catlin Indian 

gallery in the National Museum (Smith 
sonian Institution), with memoir and 
statistics. By Thomas Donaldson. 

In Annual Report of the Board of Regents of 
the Smithsonian Institution * * July, 
1885, part 2 (half-title } 1. pp. j-vii, 3-939) .AVash- 
ingtou.1886,8 , 



14 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Catlin (G.) Continued. 

Descriptive catalogue of Indian portraits 
(pp. 13-230) includes the Chinook, p. 99. 

Issued separately, with title-page as follows : 

- The | George Catlin Indian gallery | | 
in the | U. S. National Museum [(Smith- j 
sonian Institution), | with | memoir j 
and statistics. | By | Thomas Donald- | 
son. | From the Smithsonian report for ! 
1885. | 

Washington: | Government printing 
office. | 1887. 

Title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. i-iii. illus- j 
trations pp. v-vii, text pp. 3-915, index pp. 917- 
939, HO. 

Linguistic contents as under title nextabove. 

Copies seen : Eames, Pilling, Smithsonian. 

Issued also with title-page as follows : 

- The | George Catlin | Indian gal 
lery, | in the | IT. S. National Museum, I 

| (Smithsonian Institution.) | With \ 
memoir and statistics. | By Thomas 
Donaldson. | 

Washington, D. C. | W. H. Lowder- 
milk & Co. | 1888. 

Title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. i-iii, illus- j 
trations pp. v-vii, text pp. 3-915, index pp. 917- I 
939, go. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above. 

Copies seen : Lowdermilk. 

Cat! ill s notes | of | eight years ; 

travels and residence | In Europe, | 
with his | North American Indian col 
lection : | with anecdotes and incidents j 
of the travels and adventures of three 
| different parties of American Indians I 
whom he introduced | to the courts of | ! 
England, France and Belgium. | In two : 
volumes octavo. | Vol. I [-II]. | With ! 
numerous illustrations. | 

New-York: | Burgess, Stringer & co., ! 
222 Broadway. | 1848. 

2vols.: half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso ; 
copyright 1 1. preface pp. v-ix, contents pp. xi- ! 
xvi, text pp. 1-296; half-title verso blank 1 1. 
title verso copyright 1 1. contents pp. v-xii, text ; 
pp. 1-325, appendix pp. 327-336, 8. 

A descriptive catalogue of Catlin s Indian 
collection (vol. 1, pp. 248-296) includes proper 
names in a number of Indian languages, among 
them a few of the Chinook, p. 264. 

Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Powell. 
Watkinson. 

At the, Fischer sale a copy, no. 350, brought 
2*. ; the Field copy, no. 305, sold for $2.50. 

Catliii s notes | of | eight years : 

travels and residence | In Europe, | 
with his | North American Indian col 
lection: | with anecdotes and incidents 



Catlin (G.) Continued, 
of the travels and adventures of three 
| different parties of American Indians 
whom lie introduced | to the courts of | 
England, France, and Belgium. | In two 
volumes octavo. | Vol. I [-II]. | With 
numerous illustrations. | 

New York: | published l>y the author. 
| To l>e had at all the bookstores. | 1848. 

2 vols.: pp. i-xvi, 1-296; i-xii, 1-336; plates, 
8. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 
Copies seen : Congress. 

Catliu s notes | of | eight years 
travels and residence | in Europe, | 
with his | North American Indian col 
lection. | With | anecdotes and inci 
dents of the travels and adventures of 

| three different parties of American 
Indians whom he | introduced to the 
courts of | England, France, and Bel 
gium. | In two volumes, octavo. | Vol. 
I[-I1], | With numerous illustrations, 
j Second edition. | 

London: | published by the author, | 
at his Indian collection, No. 6, Water 
loo place. | 1848. 

2 vols. : half-title verso blank 1 1. frontispiece 
1 1. title verso names of printers 1 1. preface pp- 
v-ix, contents pp. xi-xvi. text pp. 1-202, appen 
dix pp. 203-247, catalogue pp. 248-296; half-title 
verso blank 1 1. title verso names of printers 1 
1. contents pp. v-xii, text pp. 1-325, appendix 
pp. 327-336, plates, 8. 

Linguistic contents as undertitlesabove. 

Copies seen: British Museum, Congress. 
Lenox, Wisconsin Historical Society. 

Some copies, otherwise as above, have "Third 
edition " (Congress) : others " Fourth edition " 
(Bureau of Ethnology, Lenox), both with the 
same date. 

Adventures | of the | Ojibbewayaud 
loway Indians | in | England, France, 
and Belgium ; | being notes of | eight 
years travels and residence in Europe | 
with his | North American Indian col 
lection, | by Geo. Catlin. | In two vol 
umes. | Vol. ![-!!]. | With numerous 
Engravings. | Third edition. | 

London: | published by the author, | 
at his Indian collection, no. 6, Water 
loo place. | 1852. 

2 vols. : half-title A-erso blank 1 1. title verso 
blank 1 1. preface pp. v-ix, contents pp. xi-xvi, 
text pp. 1-296; half-title verso blank 1 1. title 
verso names of printers 1 1. contents pp. v-xii, 
text pp. 1-325, appendices pp. 327-336, 8. 

A reprint of Notes of eight years 1 travels in 
Europe. 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



15 



Catlin (G.) Continued. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above. 

Copies seen: Astor, Boston Athen;eum, Bu 
reau of Ethnology, Wisconsin Historical Soci- 
ety. 

George Catlin, painter, born in Wilkesbarre, 
Pa., in 1796, died in Jersey City, N. J., Decem 
ber 23, 1872. He studied law at Litchfield, Conn., 
but after a few years practice went to Phila 
delphia and turned his attention to drawing 
and painting. As an artist he was entirely self- 
taught. In 1832 he went to the Far West and 
spent eight years among the Indians of Yellow 
stone River, Indian Territory, Arkansas, and 
Florida, painting a unique series of Indian por 
traits and pictures, which attracted much atten 
tion on their exhibition both in this country 
and in Europe. Among these were 470 full- 
length portraits and a largo number of pictures 
illustrative of Indian life and customs, most of 
which are now preserved in the National 
Museum, Washington. In 1852-1857 Mr. Catlin 
traveled in South and Central America, after 
which he lived in Europe until 1871, when he 
returned to the United States. One hundred 
and twenty-six of his drawings illustrative of 
Indian life were at the Philadelphia exposition 
of 1876. Appletoris Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

Chaltin (Rev. W. C.) See Gill (J. K.) 
Chamberlain (Alexander Francis). 
Words of Algonkian origin [in the 
Chinook Jargon]. 

In Science, vol. 18, pp. 260-261, New York, 
1891,4. (Pilling.) 

A list of words found in the Jargon vocabu 
laries of Winthrop, Gibbs, and Hale, which are 
of Algonquian origin. 

The Eskimo race and language. 

Their origin and relations. By A. F. 
Chamberlain, B. A. 

In Canadian Inst. Proc. third series, vol. 6, 
pp. 261-337, Toronto, 1889, 8. 

Comparative Eskimo and Indian vocabu 
laries (pp. 318-322) contain a number of Chinook 
and Watlala words (from Tolmie and Dawson, 
and from Hale), pp. 318-320. 

Notes on the Chinook Jargon as 

spoken in the Kootenay District, South 
Eastern British Columbia, by A. F. 
Chamberlain, M. A. Ph. D. 

Manuscript, 7 unnumbered pages, written on 
one side only ; in possession of its author, who 
has kindly sent it to me for inspection. 

A vocabulary of 150 Jargon words. 

Alexander Francis Chamberlain was born 
at Kenninghall, Norfolk, England, Jan. 12, 1865, 
and came to New York with his parents in 
1870, removing with them to Canada in 1874. 
He matriculated from the Collegiate Institute, 
Peterboro, Ontario, into the University of 
Toronto, in 1882, from which institution he 
graduated with honors in modern languages and 
ethnology in 1886. From 1887 to 1890 he was 



Chamberlain (A. F.) Continued. 

fellow in modern languages in University Col 
lege, Toronto, and in 1889 received the degree 
of M. A. from his alma mater. In 1890 he was 
appointed fellow in anthropology in Clark Uni 
versity, Worcester, Mass., where he occupied 
himself with studies in the Algonquian lan 
guages and the physical anthropology of Amer 
ica. In June, 1890, he went to British Colum 
bia, where, until the following October, he was 
engaged in studying the Kootenay Indians 
under the auspices of the British Association 
for the Advancement of Science. A summary 
of the results of these investigations appears 
in the proceedings of the association for 1892. 
A dictionary and grammar of the Kooteuay 
language, together with a collection of texts of 
myths, are. also being proceeded with. In 1892 
Mr. Chamberlain received from Clark Univer 
sity the degree of Ph. D. in anthropology, his 
thesis being : The Language of the Mississa- 
gas of Skugog : A contribution to the Linguis 
tics of the Algonkian Tribes of Canada," em 
bodying the results of his investigations of 
these Indians. 

Mr. Chamberlain, whose attention was, early 
in life, directed to philologic and ethnologic 
studies, has contributed to the scientific jour 
nals of America, from time to time, articles on 
subjects connected with linguistics and folk 
lore, especially of the Algonquian tribes. He 
has also been engaged in the study of the 
Low-German and French Canadian dialects, 
the results of which will shortly appear. Mr. 
Chamberlain is a member of several of the 
learned societies of America and Canada and 
fellow of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science. 

In 1892 he was appointed lecturer in anthro 
pology at Clark University. 
Chareiicey (Comte Charles Felix Hya- 
cinthe Gouhier de). [Review of] An 
international idiom, a manual of the 
Oregon trade languages or Chinook 
Jargon, by Mr. Horatio Hale. 

In Le Museon, vol. 10, pp. 273-274, Louvain, 
1891, 8. 

Chase (Pliny Earle). On the radical 
significance of numerals. 

In American Philosoph. Soc. Proc. vol. 10, pp. 
18-23, Philadelphia, 1869, 8. 

Examples in several Indian languages, 

among them the Chinook Jargon (from Gibbs). 

Chinook. The Chinook Jargon, and 

English and French equivalent forms. 

In the Steamer Bulletin, San Francisco, June 
21, 1858. (*) 

Contains an uuarranged vocabulary of 354 
words and phrases. 

Title and note from Gibbs s Dictionary of the 
Chinook Jargon. 

For notice of a reprint see Hazlitt ( W. C.) 
Chinook [Jargon] dictionary. See 
Coones (S. F.) 



16 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Chinook. [Vocabularies of some of the 
Indian languages of northwest Amer 
ica.] 

Manuscript, 2 vols. 82 pages folio. Bought 
for the Library of Congress, Washington, U. C., 
at the sale of the library of the late Mr. Geo. 
Briuley, the catalogue of which says they came 
"from the library of Dr. John Pickering, to 
whom, probably, they were presented by Mr. 
Duponceau. They were presented to Peter S. 
Duponceau, esq., with J. X. Townshend s 
respects. Fort Vancouver, Columbia River, 
September, 1835. " 

Contains linguistic material relating to a j 
number of the peoples in the vicinity of Puget i 
Sound, amongst them a Chinook vocabulary of j 
194 words and phrases, and a Chinook Jargon ! 
vocabulary, used as the means of eommunica- | 
tion between the Indians and whites on Colum- ! 
bia River, of 146 AVords. 
Chinook : 

Classification See Bates (H. W.) 
Classification Domenech (E. H. D.) 

Classification Gairduer ( ) 

Classification Gallatin (A.) 

Classification Keane(A.H.) 

Classification Jelian (L. F.) 

Classification Latham (R. G.) 

Classification Priest (J.) 

Classification Powell (J. AV.) 

Classification Rafincsque (C. S.) 

Classification Sayce (A.H.) 

Dictionary Boas (F.) 

Dictionary Gibbs (G.) 

(General discussion Bancroft (H. H.) 
General discussion Beach (AV. AV.) 
General discussion Berghaus (H.) 
General discussion Brinton (D. G.) 
General discussion Duncan (D.) 
General discussion Eells (M.) 
General discussion Featherman (A.) 
General discussion Gallatin (A.) 
General discussion Hale (H.) 
General discussion Sproat (G. M.) 
General discussion AVhymper (F.) 
Geographic names Gibbs (G.) 
Grammar Boas(F.) 

Grammatic comments Gallatin (A.) 
Grammatic comments Hale (H.) 
Grammatic treatise Boas (F.) 
Granmiatic treatise Miiller (F.) 
Hymns Blanche! (F. N.) 

Hymns Tate (C. M.) 

Legends Boas (F.) 

Lord s prayer Bergholtz (G. F.) 

Lord s prayer Duflot de Mofras (E.) 

Numerals Boas (F.) 

Numerals Dntiot de Mofras (E.) 

Numerals Eells (M.) 

Numerals Haldeman (S. S.) 

Numerals Ross (A.) 

Prayers Blanch et (F. N.) 

Proper names Catlin (G.) 

Proper names Stanley (J. M.) 

Sentences Franchere (G.) 

bongs Boas (F.) 



I Chinook Continued. 

Songs See Eells (M.) 

Texts Boas (F.) 

Tribal names Boas (F.) 

Tribal names Douglass (J.) 

Tribal names Haiues ( E. M . ) 

Vocabulary A nderson ( A . C . ) 

Vocabulary Busehmatm (J. C. E., 

Vocabulary Chinook, 

Vocabulary Domenech (E. H. D.) 

A r ocabulary Dunn (J.) 

Vocabulary Franchere (G,) 

Vocabulary Gallatin ( A . ) 

Vocabulary Hale (H.) 

Vocabulary Knipe (C.) 

Vocabulary Montgomerie (J.E.) 

Vocabulary Piriart (A. L.) 

Vocabulary Priest (J.) 

Vocabulary Rafinesque (C. S.i 

Vocabulary Ross (A.) 

Vocabulary Scouler (J.) 

Vocabulary Shortess ( K . ) 

Vocabulary Tolmie (AV. F. 

Vocabulary Tolmie (W. F.) and 

Da\vsou (G. M.) 

Vocabulary AVabass (AV. G.) 

Words Bancroft (H. H.) 

Word s Brinton ( I ) . G . ) 

Words Buschmann (J. C. E.) 

AVords Chamberlain (A. F.) 

Words Daa(L.K.) 

Words Grasserie ( R, d e la) . 

AVords Haines(E.M.) 

Words Latham (R. G.) 

AVords Platzniann (J.) 

AVords Pott(A.F.) 

Words Smith(S. B.) 

Words Tylor (E. B.) 

Words Youth s. 

Chinook Jargon. 

In American Homes, illustrated, vol. 4, pp. 
338-339, Chicago, 1873, 8. (Lenox.) 

Contains specimens of a dialogue and the 
Lord s prayer with English \vord for word 
translation. 
Chinook Jargon: 

Bible history See Durieu (P.-) 

Bible history St. Onge (L. N.) 

Bible stories Le Jeune (J. M. R.) 

Catechism Demers (M.) et al. 

Dictionary (3d ed. 1856) Blanchet (F. N.) 
Dictionary (3d ed. 1862 >) Blanchet (F. N.) 
Dictionary (4th ed. 1868) Blanchet (F. N.) 
Dictionary (6th ed. 1873 ?) Blaiichet (F. N.) 
Dictionary (6th ed. 1878) Blanchet (F. N.) 
Dictionary (7th ed. 1879) Blauchet (F. N.) 
Dictionary (Mss. 1891) Buhner (T. S.) 
Dictionary (1891) Coones (S. F.) 

Dictionary (1871) Demers (M.) et al. 

Dictionary (1862) Dictionary. 

Dictionary (1865) Dictionary. 

Dictionary (1871 ?) Dictionary. 

Dictionary (1873) Dictionary. 

Dictionary (1877?) Dictionary. 

Dictionary (1883) Dictionary. 

Dictionary (1887) Dictionary, 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



17 



Jhinook Jargon Continued. 


Chinook Jargon 


-Continued. 


Dictionary (1887) 


Dictionary. 


Lord s prayer 


Good (J.B.) 


Dictionary (1889) 


Dictionary. 


Lord s prayer 


See Hale (H.) 


Dictionary (1886) 


Durieu (P.) 


Lord s prayer 


Marietti (P.) 


Dictionary (1892) 


Durieu (P.) 


Lord s prayer 


Nicoll (E. Y.) 


Dictionary (Mss. 1893) 


Eells (M.) 


Numerals 


Cox (R.) 


Dictionary (Mss. 1884) 


Everette (W.E.) 


Numerals 


Dictionary. 


Dictionary (Wash. ,1863) 


Gibbs (G.) 


Numerals 


Gill(J.TC.) 


Dictionary (N. Y., 1863,8) 


Gibbs (G.) 


Numerals 


Good (J.B.) 


Dictionary (N. Y., 1863,4) 


Gibbs (G.) 


Numerals 


Haines (E.M.) 


Dictionary (9th ed. 1882) 


Gill (J. K.) 


Numerals 


Hale (H.) 


Dictionary (10th ed. 1884) 


Gill (J. K.) 


Numerals 


Hazlitt(W. C.) 


Dictionary (llth ed. 1887) 


GilKJ.K.) 


Numerals 


Montgomerie ( J . E . ) 


Dictionary (12th ed. 1889) 


Gill (J. K.) 


Numerals 


Nicoll (E.H.) 


Dictionary (13th ed. 1891) 


GillOT.K.) 


Numerals 


Palmer (J.) 


Dictionary (1880) 


Good (J.B.) 


Numerals 


Parker (S.) 


Dictionary (1858) 


Guide. 


Numerals 


Richardson (A. D.) 


Dictionary (1890) 


Hale (H.) 


Numerals 


Stuart (G.) 


Dictionary (1872) 


Langvein (H. L.) 


Numerals 


Swan (J. G.) 


Dictionary (1886) 


LeJeune(J. M. R.) 


Periodical 


Le Jeune (J. M. R.) 


Dictionary (1892) 


LeJeune(J. M. R.) 


Prayers 


Bulmer (T. S.) 


Dictionary (1853) 


Lionnet ( ) 


Prayers 


Demers (M.) et al. 


Dictionary (1888) 


Probschfr. W.) 


Prayers 


Tate (C. M.) 


Dictionary (Mss. 1893) 


St. Onge (L. N.) 


Primer 


Le Jeune(J.M. R.) 


Dictionary (1865) 


Stuart (G.) 


Review 


Charencey (H. de). 


Dictionary (1889) 


Tate (C.M.) 


Review 


Crane (A.) 


Dictionary (1860) 


Vocabulary. 


Review 


Leland (C. G.) 


General discussion 


Bancroft (H. H.) 


Review 


Reade (J.) 


General discussion 


Beach (W. W.) 


Review 


Western. 


General discussion 


Clough (J. C.) 


Sermons 


Eells (M.) 


General discussion 


Drake (S. G.) 


Sermons 


Hale (H.) 


General discussion 


Eells (M.) 


Sermons 


New. 


General discussion 


Gatschet (A. S.) 


Sentences 


Allen (A.) 


General discussion 


Haines (E.M.) 


Sentences 


Chinook. 


General discussion 


Hale (H.) 


Sentences 


Dictionary. 


General discussion 


Nicoll (E.H.) 


Sentences 


Eells (M.) 


General discussion 


Reade (J.) 


Sentences 


Green (J. S.) 


General discussion 


Sproat (G. M.) 


Sentences 


Hale(H.) 


General discussion 


Swan (J. G.) 


Sentences 


Leland (C. G.) 


General discussion 


Western. 


Sentences 


Maclie (M.) 


General discussion 


Wilson (D.) 


Sentences 


Macdonald (D.G. F.) 


Grammar 


Bulmer (T. S.) 


Sentences 


Stuart (G.) 


Grammatic comments 


Crane (A.) 


Songs 


Bulmer (T.S.) 


Grammatic comments 


Eells (M.) 


Songs 


Crane (A.) 


Grammatic comments 


Hale (H.) 


Ten commandments 


Everette (W.E.) 


Grammatic treatise 


Demers (M..) et al. 


Text 


Bulmer (T.S.) 


Grammatic treatise 


Hale (H.) 


Text 


Demers (M.) etal, 


Hymn book 


Eells (M.) 


Text 


Dictionary. 


Hymn book 


Le Jeune(J.M.R-) 


Text 


Eells (M.) 


Hymns 


Bulmer (T. S.) 


Vocabulary 


Anderson (A. C.) 


Hymns 


Demers (M.)e< al. 


Vocabulary 


Armstrong (A.N.) 


Hymns 


Everette (W.E.) 


Vocabulary 


Belden (G. P.) 


Hymns 


Eells (M.) 


Vocabulary 


Bolduc (J.B. Z.) 


Hymns 


Hale (H.) 


Vocabulary 


Chamberlain(A..F,) 


Hymns 


Macleod (X. D.) 


Vocabulary 


Chinook. 


Hymns 


St. Onge (L. N.) 


Vocabulary 


Cox (R.) 


Legends 


St.Ouge(L.N.) 


Vocabulary 


Dictionary. 


Lord s prayer 


Bancroft (H. H.) 


Vocabulary 


Eells (M.) 


Lord s prayer 


Bolduc (J. B. Z.) 


Vocabulary 


Everette (W. E.) 


Lord s prayer 


Bulmer (T.S.) 


Vocabulary 


Gallatin (A.) 


Lord s prayer 


Chinook. 


Vocabulary 


Gibbs (G.) 


Lord s prayer 


Dictionary. 


Vocabulary 


Guide. 


Lord s prayer 


Eells (M.) 


Vocabulary 


Haines (E.M.) 


Lord s prayer 


Everette (W.E.) 


Vocabulary 


Hale (H.) 


Lord s prayer 


Gibbs (G.) 


Vocabulary 


Hazlitt (W. C.) 


Lord s prayer 


Gill(J.K.) 


Vocabulary 


Le Jeune(J.M. R.) 


CHIN 2 









18 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Chinook Jargon Continued. 

Vocabulary See Lionnet ( ) 

Vocabulary MacdonahHD.G. F.) 

Vocabulary Palmer (J.) 

Vocabulary Parker (S.) 

Vocabulary Richardson (A. D.) 

Vocabulary Ross (A.) 

Vocabulary Sehoolcraft (H. K.) 

Vocabulary Scouler (J.) 

Vocabulary Sproat (G.M.) 

Vocabulary Swan (J. G.) 

Vocabulary Vocabulary. 

Vocabulary Winthrop (T.) 

Worda Chamberlain (A.F.) 

Worda Chase ( P. E.) 

Words Crane (A.) 

Worda Eells (M.) 

Worda Latham (R. Or.) 

Words Leland (C. G.) 

Words Norris (P. W.) 

Words Tylor (E. B.) 

Words Wilson (D.) 
Clakama: 

Proper names See Stanley ( J. M . ) 

Sentences Gatschet (A. S.) 

Vocabulary Gatschet (A. S.) 
Classification: 

Chinook See Bates (H. W.) 

Chinook Domeneeh (E. H. D.) 

Chinook Gairdner ( ) 

Chinook Gallatiu (A.) 

Chinook Jehan (L. F.) 

Chinook Keane(A.H.) 

Chinook Latham (R. G.) 

Chinook Priest (J.) 

Chinook Powell (J. W.) 

Chinook Rafinesque (C. S.) 

Chinook Sayce (A. H.) 
Clatsop: 

Vocabulary See Emmons (G. F.) 

Vocabulary Hale (H.) 

Vocabulary Lee (D.) and Frost 

(J. H.) 

Vocabulary Semple (J. E.) 

Clough (James Cresswell). On | the 
existence | of | mixed languages | 
being | an examination of the funda- j 
mental axioms of the | foreign school of j 
modern philology, more | especially as ! 
applied to the English | Prize Essay | ! 
by | James Cresswell Clough | fellow of j 
the Royal historical society | member 
of the English dialect society ; assistant ; 
at Huddersrield college | late modern i 
master at Liverpool college | [Greek i 
quotation, one line] | 

London | Longmans, Green, and co | 
1876 | All rights reserved 

Half-title verso names of printers 1 1. title 
verso blank 1 1. preface p. [v], statements etc. 
p. [vi], contents pp. [vii]-viii, text pp. 1-125, 
postscript p. [126], 8. 



Clough ( J. C. ) -- Continued. 

Some account of the Chinook Jargon, with 
specimen words (from Wilson s Prehistoric 
man), pp. 7-9. 

Copies seen: Eames. 

Comolete Chinook Jargon. See Probsch 
(T.W.) 

Complete dictionary of the Chinook Jar 
gon. (1856-1862.) See Blanche!: (F. X.) 

Complete dictionary of the Chinook 
Jargon. (1882.) See Gill (J. K.) 

Congress : This word following a title or Avithin 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler in the Library of Congress, Washington. 
B.C. 

[Coones (S. F.)] Dictionary | of the | 
Chinook Jargon | as spoken on | Puget 
sound and the northwest, | with | 
original Indian names for prominent 
places | and localities with their mean 
ings, | historical sketch, etc. | 

Published by | Lowman & Hanford 
stationery & printing co., | Seattle, 
Wash. [1891.] 

Cover title : Chinook Dictionary ) and | orig 
inal Indian names | of | western Washington. 
| [Picture.] | 

Lowman & Hanford | stationery & | print 
ing company. [1891.] 

Cover title, title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. 
[3-4], p. 5 blank, key to pronunciation p. [6], 
numerals p. [7], text pp. 9-38, 24. 

Numerals, p. [7]. Chinook-English diction 
ary alphabetically arranged, pp. 9-32. English 
conversation and interrogatories, answered in 
Chinook, pp. 33-34. The oath. p. 34. 

Copies seen : Eames. Pilling. 

Cornell: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to lias been seen by the com 
piler, belonging to the library of that uni 
versity, Ithaca, IN". Y. 

Cox (Ross). Adventures | on the | 
Columbia river, | including | the narra 
tive of a residence | of six years on the 
western side of | the Rocky mountains, 
| among | various tribes of Indians | 
hitherto unknown : | together with | a 
journey across the American continent. 
| By Ross Cox. | In two volumes. | 
Vol. I [-II]. | 

London: | Henry Colburn and Rich 
ard Bentley, | New Burlington street. | 
1831. 

2 vols. : title verso name of printer 1 1. dedi 
cation verso blank 1 1. preface pp. vii-ix, intro 
duction pp. xi-xx, contents of vol. 1 pp. xxi- 
xxiv, text pp. 1-388; title verso name of printer 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



19 



Cox (R.) Continued. 

1 1. contents pp. v-viii; text pp. 1-393, appendix 
pp. 395-400, 8. 

Numerals 1-12, 20, ami a short vocabulary (7 
words and 3 phrases) in Chinook Jargon, vol. 2, 
p. 134. 

Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athemeum, Brit 
ish Museum, Congress. 

Sabin s Dictionary, no. 17267, mentions a 
" second edition, London, 1832, 8 . 

The | Columbia river; | or, | scenes 

and adventures | during | a residence 
of six years on the western | side of the 
Rocky mountains | among | various 
tribes of Indians | hitherto unknown ; 

| together with | a journey across the 
American continent. | By Ross Cox. | 
In two volumes. | Vol. I [-II]. | Third 
edition. | 

London: | Henry Colburn and Rich 
ard Bentley. | New Burlington street. 

| 1832. 

2 vols. : title verso names of printers 1 1. 
dedication verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vi. 
introduction pp. vii-xvi, contents pp. xvii-xx r 
text pp. 1-333; title verso names of printers 1 1. 
contents pp. iii-vi, text pp. 1-350, 8. 

Linguistic contents as under title next 
above, vol. 2, pp. 117-118. 

Copies seen : Greely. 

Adventures | on the | Columbia 

river, | including | the narrative of a 
residence | of six years on the western 
side of | the Rocky mountains, | among 
| various tribes of Indians | hitherto 
unknown: | together with | a journey 
across the American continent. | By 
Ross Cox. | % 

New York : | printed and published 
by J. & J. Harper, 82 Cliff-street. | And 
sold by the principal booksellers 
throughout the United States. | 1832. 

Title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, intro 
duction pp. vii-x, contents pp. xi-xv, text pp. 
25-331, appendix pp. 333-335, 8. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above, 
pp. 225-226. 

Copies seen : Bancroft, Congress, Harvard, 
Mallet, Pilling. 

Crane (Agnes). The Chinook Jargon. 

In the Brighton Herald, no. 4883, p. 4, 
Brighton, England, July 12, 1890, folio. (Pilling.) 

A review of Hale (H.), Manual of the Oregon 
trade language. It occupies a column and a 
half of the Herald and contains a n umber of 
Jargon words with their derivations, a brief 



Crane (A.) Continued. 

outline of phonetics and grammar of the lan 
guage, and one verse of a song, with English 
translation. 

Curtin (Jeremiah). [Words, phrases, 
and sentences in the Wasko language.] 

Manuscript, pp. 77-228, 4, in the library of 
the Bureau of Ethnology. Recorded at Warm 
Spring, Oregon, in 1884, in a copy of Powell s 
Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages, 
second edition. The Bureau alphabet is used. 

Of the schedules, nos. 1-4, 6-8. 16, 18-29 are 
well filled ; nos. 5, 10, 12-14, and 17 partially so; 
and nos. 9. 11, 15, and 30 have no entries. 

Jeremiah Curtin was born in Milwaukee, 
Wis., about 1835. He had little education in 
childhood, but at the age of twenty or twenty- 
one prepared himself to enter Phillips Exeter 
Academy, made, extraordinary progress, and 
soon entered Harvard College, where he was 
graduated in 1803. By this time he had become 
noted among his classmates and acquaintances 
for his wonderful facility as a linguist. Onleav- 
ing college lie had acquired a good knowledge 
of French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, 
Roumanian, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic, 
Gothic, German, andFinnish. besides Greek and 
Latin. He had also made considerable progress 
in Hebrew, Persian, and Sanskrit, and was 
beginning to speak Russian. When Admiral 
Lissofsky s fleet visited this cour.try, in 1864, 
Curtin became acquainted with the officers and 
accompanied the expedition on its return to 
Russia. In St. Petersburg he obtained employ 
ment as a translator of polyglot telegraphic 
dispatches, but he was presently appointed by 
Mr. Seward to the office of secretary of the 
United States legation, and he held this place 
till 1868. During this period he became familiar 
with the Polish, Bohemian, Lithuanian, 
Lettish, and Hungarian languages, and made a 
beginning in Turkish. From 1868 till 1877 he 
traveled in eastern Europe and in Asia, appar 
ently in the service of the Russian government. 
In 1873, at the celebration at Prague of the 500th 
anniversary of the birth of John Huss, he 
delivered the oration, speaking with great elo 
quence in the Bohemian language. During his 
travels in the Danube country he learned to 
speak Slavonian. Croatian, Servian, and Bulga 
rian. He lived for some time in the Caucasus, 
where lie learned Mingrelian, Abkasian, and 
Armenian. At the beginning of the Russo- 
Turkish war in 1877, he left the Russian domin 
ions, and, after a year in London, returned tr> 
his native country. Since then he has been 
studying the languages of the American 
Indians and has made valuable researches 
under the auspices of Maj. John W. Powell and 
the Bureau of Ethnology. He is said to be 
acquainted with more than fifty languages. = 
Appleton s Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 



20 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



D. 



Daa (Ludwig Kristensen). On the affin 
ities between the languages of the 
northern tribes of the old and new con 
tinents. By Lewis Kr. Daa, Esq., of 
Christiania, Norway. (Read December 
the 20th.) 

In Philological Soc. [of London] Trans. 1856, 
pp. 251-294, London [1857], 8. (Congress.) 

Comparative tables showing affinities be 
tween Asiatic and American languages, pp. 
264-285. contain words from many North Amer 
ican languages, among them a few of the 
Tsehiuuk. 

Dawson (Dr. George Mercer). See 
Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson (G. M.) 

George Mercer Dawson was born at Pictou. 
Nova Scotia, August 1, 1849, and is the eldest son 
of Sir William Dawson, principal of McGill 
University, Montreal. He was educated at 
McGill College and thelloyal School of Mines ; 
held the Duke of Cornwall s scholarship, given 
by the Prince of Wales; and took the Edward 
Forbes medal in palaeontology and the Mur- 
chison medal in geology. He was appointed 
geologist and naturalist to Her Majesty s North 
American Boundary Commission in 1873, and 
atthe close of the commission s work, in 1875, he 
published a report under the title of "Geology 
and Resources of the Forty ninth Parallel. In j 
July, 1875, he received an appointment on the j 
geologiealsurvey of Canada. From 1875 to 1879 
he was occupied in the geological survey and 
exploration of British Columbia, and subse 
quently engaged in similar work both in the ! 
Northwest Territory and British Columbia. Dr. 
Dawson is the author of numerous papers on j 
geology, natural history, and ethnology, pub- j 
lished in the Canadian Naturalist. Quarterly | 
Journal of the Geological Society, Transactions j 
of the Royal Society of Canada, etc. He was in j 
1887 selected to take charge of the Yukon expe 
dition. 

Definitio Doginatis . . . Jargon 
Tchinook. See Demera (M.) 

De Horsey (Lieut. Algernon Frederick 
Rons). See Montgomerie (J. E.) and 
De Horsey (A.F.R.) 

[Demers (Bishop Modeste).] Definitio i 
Dogmatis Immacnlatie Conceptions j 
Beatissinue Virginis Mariie. | a SS. D. \ 
N. Pio PP. IX. 

Second heading: Eadem in earn Lin- j 
guain translata qu;e vulgo Jargon I 
Tchinook | dicitnr, quyeque obtinet in 
tota Oregoneusi Provincia; | anctore ! 
Episcopo Vancouveriensis Insulre. 

Colophon : Typis Joan iiis Marine Shea, ; 
Neo Eboraceusis. [I860?] 

No title-page, headings only ; text 1 leaf verso I 
blank, 12. 



Demers (M.) Continued. 

The dogma is first given in Latin, followed 
by the translation into the Chinook Jargon. 
Cojiies seen : Georgetown, Pilling. 

Blanchet (F. N.) and St. Onge (L. 
N.) J. M. J. | Chinook [Jargon] | 
Dictionary, Catechism, | prayers and 
hymns, j Composed in" 1838 & 1839 by 
| rt. rev. Modeste Demers. | Revised, 
corrected and completed, | in 1867 by 
| most rev. F. N. Blanchet. j With mod 
ifications and additions by | Rev. L. N. 
St. Onge Missionary | among the Yaka- 
mas and other Indian Tribes. | 

Montreal. | 1871. 

Cover title : The | missionary s companion | 
on the | Pacificcoast. | [Picture.] | [Three lines 
of scripture Mat. xxiii. 19.] 

Cover title, frontispiece verso blank 1 1. title 
A-erso blank 1 1. plate 1 1. preface (by Father 
St. Onge, unsigned) pp. 7-9. text pp. 9-05. ad 
denda p. 66, table [of contents] p. 67, errata p. 
68. 16. 

Short account of the origin of the Chinook 
Jargon, pp. 7-8. Rules of the language, pp. 9- 
10. Of the nouns, pp. 11-12. Orthography, p. 
12. Chinook [Jargon] dictionary (pp. 13-32) in 
double columns, under the following heads, each 
alphabetically arranged by Jargon words: 
Nouns, pp. 13-22; Adjectives, pp. 23-25; Num 
bers, pp. 25-26; Pronouns, p. 26; Verbs, pp. 26- 
29; Adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and 
interjections, pp. 30-31. Appendix, pp. 31-32. 
The Christian prayers in Chinook [Jargon], 
pp. 33-38. Hymns (in Jargon with French 
headings), pp. 39-46. Catechism (in Jargon 
with English headings), pp. 47-65 Addenda [a 
short vocabulary], p. 66. 

i: The Chinook Jargon was invented by the 
Hudson Bay Company traders, who were 
mostly French Canadians. Having to trade with 
the numerous tribes inhabiting the countries 
west of the Ilocky Mountains, it was necessary 
to have a language understood by all. Hence, 
the idea of composing the Chinook Jargon. 
Fort Vancouver being the principal post, the 
traders of the twenty-nine forts belonging to 
the company, on the western slope, and the 
Indians from every part of that immense 
country, had to come to Vancouver for the 
trading season. They used to learn the Chinook 
and then teach it to others. In this manner it 
became universally known. 

The two first missionaries to Oregon, Ilev. 
F. N. Blanchet, V. G., and his worthy compan 
ion, Rev. Mod. Demers, arrived from Canada to 
Vancouver on the 24th of November, 1838. They 
had to instruct numerous tribes of Indians, 
and the wives and children of the whites, who 
spoke only tho Chinook. The two missionaries 
set to work to learn it. and in a few weeks 
Father Demers had mastered it and began to 
preach 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



21 



Demers (M.) Continued. 

" He composed a vocabulary which was very 
useful to other missionaries. He composed sev 
eral canticles, which the Indians learned and 
sang with taste and delight. He also translated 
all the Christian prayers in the same language. 

" Such is the origin of the Chinook Jargon, 
which enabled the two lirst missionaries in the 
country to do a great deal of good among the 
Indians and half-breeds. The invention of the 
Catholic Ladder, in April, 1839, by Very Rev. 
Blanchet, and its [oral] explanation in Chinook, 
had a marvelous success and gave the Catholic 
missionaries a great superiority and preponder 
ance much envied by the missionaries belong 
ing to other denominations. 

" Father Deniers, afterwards Bishop of Van - 
convers Island, has now gone to enjoy the 
reward of his great labours and apostolic zeal. 
It would be too bad to lose his Dictionary and 
other Chinook works. So, Archbishop Blau- 
chet, who has himself made a compendium of 
the Christian doctrine in the same language, has 
had the good inspiration to get the whole pub 
lished with his corrections and additions." - 
Preface by Father St. Onge. 

Concerning the preparation and publication 
of this work, Father St. Onge writes me as fol 
lows : 

"Bishop Demers s little book, which was 
corrected by Archbishop Blanchet, was never 
printed. The archbishop gave me the manu 
script, which I arranged. I made the spelling 
uniform and overhauled it completely. I was 
in the hospital at Montreal at the time, where 
my bishop had sent me because of ill health. 
When I got a little stronger, time being hard 
to pass, I procured a small press, went to work 
and printed this Chinook book and the Yakama 
catechism. It was hard work for an invalid, 
and I made the dictionary as short as possible. 

The Catholic Ladder, of which I send you 
a copy, was, as you suggest, published by 
Father Lacombe; hut it is only an embellished 
edition of the Ladder invented by Archbishop 
Blanchet in April, 1839. The archbishop 
never printed any Chinook explanation of it, 
and in my preface to the Chinook Dictionary 
the word oral should have been included. 

Copies seen : Eames, Pilling, Trumbull, 
Wellesley. 

Modeste Demers. R. C. bishop, born in Can 
ada, died in Vancouver s Island in 1871. He 
went to the Northwest Territory in 1838 and 
was engaged in missionary duty among the 
Indians until 1847, when he was consecrated 
bishop of Vancouver s Island. Appleton s 
Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

Dickinson ( ). See Everette ( W. E.) 

Dictionary | of | Indian Tongues | eon- 
tain ing most of the words and terms | 
used in the | Tsimpsean, Hydah, & 
Chinook, j with their meaning or equiv 
alent | in the | English Language. | 



Dictionary Continued. 

Published by Hibben & Carswell, | 
Victoria, V. I. | Printed at the office of 
the Daily Chronicle, | Government 
Street. | 1862. (*) 

Titie 1 1. text pp. 1-15, 16. 

Hydah vocabulary, pp. 1-3. Tsimpsean 
vocabulary, graminatic notes and phrases, pp. 
3-10. Chinook Jargon, pp. 11-15. 

Title from Dr. Franz Boas from copy in his 
possession. 

Dictionary | of | Indian tongues, | con 
taining | Most of the Words and Terms 
| used in the | Tshinipsean, Hydah, and 
Chinook,] with their meaning or equiv 
alent | in the | English language. | 

Published by | Hibben &. Carswell, 
| Victoria. V. I. | Printed at the Brit 
ish colonist office. | 1865. 

Cover title verso advertisement, no inside 
title, text pp. 1-14, sq. 16. 

Chinook Jargon-English vocabulary, double 
columns, pp. 1-4. Chinook examples (phrases 
and sentences), p. 5. Hy dab-English vocabu 
lary, double columns, pp. G-7. English-Tshim- 
shean [sic] vocabulary, verbal conjugations, 
phrases and sentences, double columns, pp. 8- 
14. 

Copies Keen : Astor, Eames. 

Dictionary. A | dictionary | of the | 
Chinook Jargon, | or | Indian Trade 
Language, | Of the North Pacific Coast. 
| [Picture of an Indian.] | 

Published by T. N. Hibben & Co., | 
Victoria, B. C. | Colonist print Vic 
toria, B. C. [1871?] 

Cover title as above, no inside title, text pp. 
1-29, advertisement on back cover, 8. 

Chinook-English, pp. 1-1 8. English-Chinook, 
pp. 19-29. Lord s prayer in Jargon with inter 
linear English translation, p. 29. 

Copies seen : Bancroft . Cornell, Eames, Trum 
bull, Wellesley. 

For the most part a reprint, with omissions, of 
G-ibbs (G.), Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon. 

Reprinted in: British Columbia; Report of 
the Hon. H. L. Langvein, C. B. Minister of Pub 
lic Works, pp. 161-182, Ottawa, 1872, 8. 
(Georgetown.) 

Dictionary | of the | Chinook Jargon, | 
or, | Indian Trade Language | of the 
| north Pacific coast. | 

Victoria, B. C. : | T. N. Hibben & 
co., publishers, | Government street. 
[1877?] 

Cover title : Dictionary j of the | Chinook 
Jargon, | or | Indian Trade Language | of the 
| north Pacific coast. | [Picture.] | 

Victoria, B. C. : | Published by T. N. Hibben 
& Co.. | Government Street. [1877?] 



22 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Dictionary Continued. 

Cover title, title verso copyright notice (1877) 
and name of printer 1 1. text pp. 5-33, 8. 

Part I. Chinook-English, alphabetically 
arranged, pp. 5-23. Part II. English Chinook, 
double columns, alphabetically arranged, pp. 
23-33. Lord s prayer in Jargon, with inter 
linear English translation, p. 33. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 

Dictionary | of the | Chinook Jargon, | 
or | Indian Trade Language | of the | 
north Pacific coaat. | 

Victoria, B. C. | T. N. Hibben & Co., 
publishers, | Government Street. | 1883. 

Cover title : New Edition. | Dictionary | of 
the | Chinook Jargon, | or | Indian Trade Lan 
guage | of the | north Pacific coast. | [Pic 
ture.] | 

Victoria, B. C. : | Published by T. N. Hibben 
& Co. | Government street. [1883.] 

Cover title, title verso copyright notice (1877) 
and name of printer 1 1. text pp. 5-35, 8. 

Part I. Chinook-English, pp. 5-24 Part II. 
English-Chinook, pp. 24-34. Lord s prayer 
in Jargon with English interlinear translation, 
p. 35. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 

Dictionary | of the | Chinook Jargon, | 
or | Indian Trade Language | of the | 
north Pacific coast. | 

Victoria, B. C. | T. N. Hibben & co., 
Publishers, ! Government Street, | 1887. 

Cover title: New Edition. | Dictionary | of the 
| Chinook Jargon, | or | Indian Trade Language 
| of the | north Pacific coast. | [Picture.] | 

Victoria, B. C. : | Published by T. N. Hibben 
& Co. | Government street. [1887.] 

Cover title verso advertisement, title verso 
copyright notice (1887) and name of printer 1 1. 
text pp. 3-33, 8. 

Part I. Chinook-English, alphabetically 
arranged, pp. 3-21. Part II. English-Chinook, 
alphabetically arranged, pp. 22-32. Lord s 
prayer in Jargon witli interlinear English 
translation, p. 33. 
Copies seen : Ford. 

Dictionary | of the | Chinook Jargon, | 
or | Indian Trade Language | of the | 
north Pacific coast. | 

Victoria, B. C. | B. C. stationery co., 
Publishers, | Government Street, 1887. 

Cover title : Dictionary | of the | Chinook 
Jargon, | or | Indian Trade Language | of the 
| north Pacific coast. | New edition. | 

B. C. stationery co., Publishers, | Govern 
ment Street, | Victoria, B. C. | 1887. 

Cover title, title verso copyright notice (1877, 
by T. N. Hibben) and name of printer 1 l.text 
pp. 3-33, 8. 

Part I. Chinook-English, alphabetically 
arranged, pp. 3 21. Part II. English-Chinook, 
double columns, alphabetically arranged, pp. 



Dictionary Continued. 

22-32. Lord s prayer in Jargon, with inter 
linear English translation, p. 33. 
Copies seen: Pilling. 

Dictionary | of the j Chinook Jargon, | 
or | Indian Trade Language, | of the | 
north Pacific coast. | [Vignette.] | 

Victoria, B. C. | T. N. Hibben [&.] 
co., Publishers. | Government Street, | 
1889. 

Cover title: New Edition. | Dictionary | of 
the | Chinook Jargon, | or | Indian Trade Lan 
guage | of the [north Pacific coast. ; [Pictiu-e.] | 

Victoria, B. C. \ Published by T. N. Hibben 
& eo. | Government street, [1889.] 

Cover title, title verso copyright (1877) and 
name of printer 1 1. text pp. 3-32, 8. 

Part I. Chinook-English, alphabetically 
arranged, pp. 3-21. Part II. English-Chinook, 
alphabetically arranged, double columns, pp. 
21-32. Lord s prayer in Jargon with interlin 
ear English translation, p. 32. 

Copies seen : Pilling, 

Dictionary | of the | Chinook Jargon | 
or | Indian trade language | now in 
general use on | the north-west coast. 
| Adapted for general business. | 

Olympia, W. T. | T. G. Lowe & co., 
publishers and stationers. | 1873. | 
Printed at the Courier job rooms, 
Olympia, W. T. 

Title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-32, 12. 

Part I. Chinook-English, pp. 1-20. Part II. 
English-Chinook, pp. 21-32. 

Copies seen : Bancroft. 

Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon. 

(1868-1879.) See Blanchet (P. N.) 
Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon. 

(1891.) See Coones (S. F.) 
Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon. 

(1882-1887.) See Gill (J. K.) 
Dictionary of the Chinook . . . trade 

language. See Probsch (T. W.) 

Dictionary : 

Chinook See Boas (F.) 

Chinook Gibbs (G.) 

Jargon (3d ed. 1856) Blauchet (F. N.) 

" Jargon (3d ed. 1862?) Blanchet (F. N.) 

" Jargon (4th ed. 1868) Blanchet (F. N.) 

" Jargon (6th ed. 1873?) Blanchet (F. N.) 

" Jargon (6th ed. 1878) Blanchet (F. N.) 

11 Jargon (7th ed. 1879) Blanchet (F.N.) 

" Jargon (Mss. 1891) Buhner (T. S.) 

" Jargon (1891) Coones (S. F.) 

Jargon (1871) Demers (M.) et al. 

" Jargon (1862) Dictionary. 

Jargon (1865) Dictionary. 

" Jargon (1871 ?) Dictionary. 

Jargon (1873) Dictionary. 

" Jargon (1877?) Dictionary. 



OHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



23 



Dictionary Continued. 
Chinook- -Continued. 



Jargon (1883) 


Dictionary. 


-Jargon (1887) 


Dictionary. 


Jargon (1887) 


Dictionary. 


Jargon (1889) 


Dictionary. 


Jargon (1886) 


Durieu (P.) 


Jargon (1892) 


Dnrieu (P.) 


Jargon (Mss. 1893) 


Eells (M.) 


Jargon (Mss. 1884) 


Everette (W.E.) 


Jargon (Wash., 1863) 


Gibbs (GO 


Jargon (N.Y., 1863,8) 


Gibbs (G.) 


Jargon (N. Y., 1863,4) 


Gibbs (G.) 


Jargon (9th ed. 1882) 


Gill (J. K.) 


Jargon (10th ed. 1884) 


Gill(J.K.) 


Jargon (llth ed. 1887) 


Gill(J.K.) 


Jargon (12th ed. 1889) 


Gill(J.K.) 


Jargon (13th ed. 1891) 


Gill(J.K-) 


Jargon (1880) 


Good(J. B.) 


Jargon (1858) 


Guide. 


Jargon (1890) 


Hale (H.) 


Jargon (1872) 


Langvein (H. L.) 


Jargon (1886) 


LeJeune(J.M.R.) 


Jargon (1892) 


LeJeuue(J.M.R.) 


Jargon (1853) 


Lior.net ( ) 


Jargon (1888) 


Probsch (T. VT.) 


Jargon (Mss. 1893) 


St. Onge (L. N.) 


Jargon (1865) 


Stuart (G.) 


Jargon (1889) 


Tate(C.M.) 


Jargon (1860) 


Vocabulary. 



Domenech (Abbe Emanuel Henri Dieu- 
doime"). Seven years 7 residence \ in the 
great j deserts of North America j by the 
| abbe" Em. Domeuech | Ax>ostolical Mis 
sionary : Canon of Montpellier : Mem 
ber of the Pontifical Academy Tiberina, 
| and of the Geographical and Ethno 
graphical Societies of France, &c. | 
Illustrated Avith fifty-eight woodcuts by 
A. Joliet, three plates of ancient Indian 
music, and a map showing the actual 
situation of | the Indian tribes and the 
country described by the author. | In 
Two Volumes | Vol. ![-!!]. | 

London | Longman, Green, Longman, 
and Roberts | 1860 j The right of trans 
lation is reserved. 

2 vols. : hal- title verso names of printers 1 1. 
title verso blank 1 1. dedication pp. v-vi, preface 
pp. vii-xiii. contents pp. xv-xxi. list of illus 
trations pp. xxiii-xxiv, text pp. 1-445 ; half-title 
verso names of printers 1 1. title verso blank 1 
1. contents pp. v-xii, text pp. 1-465, colophon 
p. [466], map, plates, 8. 

List of Indian tribes of North America, vol. 
1, pp. 440-445. Vocabularies.etc. vol. 2, pp. 164- 
189, contain 84 words of the Chinook. 

Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athenaeum, Brit 
ish Museum, Congress, Watkinson. 

At the Field sale a eopy,no.550, brought $2.37, 
and at the Pinart sale, no. 328, 6 fr. Clarke & 
co. 1886, no. 5415, price a copy $5. 



Domeiiech (E. H. D.) Continued. 

Emanuel Henri Dieudonne Domenech, French 
author, was born in Lyons, France, November 4, 
1825 ; died in France in June, 1886. He became 
a priest in the Roman Catholic church, and was 
sent as a missionary to Texas and Mexico. Dur 
ing Maximilian s residence in America, Dome 
nech acted as private chaplain to the emperor, 
and he was also almoner to the French army 
during its occiipatiou of Mexico. On his return 
to France he was made honorary canon of Mont 
pellier. His " Mamiscrit pictographique anieri- 
cain, precede d une notice sur 1 ideographie des 
Peaux Rouges" (I860) was published by the 
French government, with a facsimile of a man 
uscript in the library of the Paris arsenal, 
relating, as he claimed, to the American Indians ; 
but the German orientalist, Julius Petzholdt, 
declared that it consisted only of scribbling and 
incoherent illustrations of a local German dia 
lect. Domenech maintained the authenticity of 
the manuscript in a pamphlet entitled " La 
verite sur le livre des sauvages" (1861), which 
drew forth a reply from Petzholdt. translated 
into French under the title of "Le livre des 
sauvages an point de vue de la civilisation 
francaise" (Brussels, 1861). During the latter 
part of his life he produced several works per 
taining to religion and ancient history. Apple- 
ton s Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

Douglass (Sir James). Private papers | 
of Sir James Douglass. | Second series. 

Manuscript, pp. 1-36, folio; in the Bancroft 
Library, San Francisco, Gal. 

Contains lists of native tribes from Puget 
Sound northward to Cross Sound, Alaska, 
with traders and native tribal names, grouped 
according to languages, pp. 7-33. Between pp. 
33 and 34 are 14 blank pages. 

This manuscript was copied from the orig 
inal papers in Sir James s possession ; in Indian 
names the copyist has universally substituted 
an initial li, for the initial K. 

Drake (Samuel Gardner). The | Aborig 
inal races | of | North America ; | com 
prising | biographical sketches of emi 
nent individuals, | and | an historical 
account of the different tribes, | from 
| the first discovery of the continent | 
to | the present period | with a disser 
tation on their | Origin, Antiquities, 
Manners and Customs, | illustrative 
narratives and anecdotes, | and a | 
copious analytical index | by Samuel 
G.Drake. Fifteenth edition, | revised, 
with valuable additions. | by Prof. II. 
L.Williams. | [Quotation, six lines.] | 
New York. | Hurst & company, pub 
lishers. | 122 Nassau Street. [1882.] 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. 3-4, 
contents pp. 5-8, Indian tribes and nations pp. 



24 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Drake (8. G.) Continued. 

9-16, half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 19-767, 
index pp. 768-787, 8. 

Gatschet (A. S.), Indian languages of the 
Pacific States, pp. 748-763. 

Copies seen : Astor, Congress, Wisconsin 
Historical Society. 

Clarke & co. 1886. no. 6377, price a copy $3. 

Duflot de Mofras (Eugene). Exploration 
| du territoire | de 1 Oregou, | desCali- 
fornies | et de la uier Vermeille, | exe 
cute" e pendant les anne es 1840, 1841 et 
1842, | par | M. Duflot de Mofras, | At 
tache" a la legation de France a Mexico ; 
| ouvrage publi6 par ordreduroi, | sous 
les auspices de M. le marechal Soult, 
due de Dalmatie, President du Conseil, 
| et de M. le miiiistre des affaires 
Stranger es. j Tome premier [-second]. | 

Paris, j Art-bus Bertraud, eVliteur, | 
libraire de la Socie"te" de geographic, | 
Rue Hautefeuille, n 23. | 1844. 

2 vols. : frontispiece 1 1. half-title verso names 
of printers 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. dedication 
verso blank 1 1. avant-propos pp. vii-xii, aver- 
tissement verso note 1 1. nota verso blank 1 1. 
text pp. 1-518, table des chapitres pp. 519-521, 
table des cartes pp. 523-524; half-title verso 
names of printers 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. text 
pp. 1-500, table des chapitres pp. 501-504, table 
des cartes pp. 505-506, table alpha-be tique et ana- 
lytique des matieres pp. 507-514, 8. atlas folio. 

Chapitre xiii, Philologie, diversites de lan- 
gues, etc. (vol. 2, pp. 387-484), includes the 
Lord s prayer in langue Tchinouk du Rio Co 
lombia, p. 390; numerals 1-10 of the Tchiuooks, 
p. 401. 

Copies seen : Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athe- 
11161111), British Museum, Congress, Geological 
Survey. 

Dufosse (E.) Americana | Catalogue de 
livres | relatifs a 1 Ame rique | Europe. 
Asie, Afriqne | etOee auie | [&c.thirty- 
four lines] | 

Librairie ancienne et moderne de E. 
Dufosse" | 27, rue Guenegaud, 27 | pres 
le Pont-neuf | Paris [1887] 

Cover title as above, no inside title, table des 
divisions 1 1. text pp. 175-422, 8. 

Contains, passim, titles of a few works 
relating to tbe Chinookan languages. 

Copies seen : Eanies, Pilling. 

This series of catalogues was begun in 1876. 
Dunbar: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler in the library of Mr. John B. Dunbar, 
Bloomfield, N. J., which is now dispersed. 

Duncan (David). American races. Com 
piled and abstracted by Professor Dun 
can, M. A. 



Duncan (D.) Continued. 

Forms Part 6 of Spencer (H.), Descriptive 
sociology, London, 1878, folio. (Congress.) 

Under the heading " Language, " pp. 40-42, 
there are given comments and extracts from 
various authors upon native tribes, including 
examples of the Chinook, p. 42. 

Some copies have the imprint : New York, D. 
Appleton & co. [n. d.] (Powell.) 

Dunn (Jobu). History | of ) tbe Oregon 
territory | and Britisb Nortb-American 
| fur trade ; | with | an account j of tbe 
habits and customs of tbe principal 
native | tribes on tbe northern conti 
nent. | By John Dunn, | late of the 
Hudson s bay company; | eight years 
a resident in tbe | country. | 

London : | Edwards and Hughes, Ave 
Maria lane. | 1844. 

Title verso name of printer 1 1. preface pp. 
iii-vi, contents pp. vii-viii, text pp. 1-359, map, 
8. 

A vocabulary (32 words and 9 phrases) of the 
language of the Chinook tribe, p. 359. 

Copies seen : British Museum, Congress. 

There is an edition of this work : Philadel 
phia, Zeiber & co , 1845, which does not contain 
the vocabulary. (Boston Athenaeum, British 
Museum. Harvard.) 

Reprinted, omitting the linguistics, in 
Smith s Weekly Volume, vol. 1, pp. 382-416, 
Philadelphia, 1845, 4. (Mallet.) 

History | of | tbe Oregon territory | 
and Britisb Nortb-American j fur trade ; 
| witb | an account j of the habits and 
customs of the principal native | tribes 
on tbe northern continent. | By John 
Dunn, | late of the Hudson bay com 
pany, | eight years a resident in the 
country. | Second edition. | 

London: | Edwards and Hughes, Ave- 
Maria lane. | 1846. 

Title verso name of printer 1 1. preface pp. 
iii-vi, contents pp. vii-viii, text pp. 1-359, map, 
8. 

Linguistic contents asunder title next above, 
p. 359. 

Copies seen : Astor. 

[Durieu (Bishop Paul).] Bible history 
| containing the most | remarkable 
events | of the | old and new testa 
ment. | To which is added a compen 
dium of | church history. | For tbe use 
of the Catholic schools | in the United 
States. | By | right rev. Richard Gil- 
inour, D. D., | Bishop of Cleveland. 
[Translated into the Chinook Jargon 
by right rev. Paul Durieu, Bishop of 
British Columbia.] | [Vignette.] | 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



25 



Durieu (P. ) Continued. 

New- York, Cincinnati, and Chicago : 
| Benziger brothers, | printers to the 
holy apostolic see. [n. d.] [Kamloops, 
B.C.: 1893.] 

Frontispiece verso 1. 1 recto blank, title verso 
letter from Pope Leo XIII and copyright notice 
(1869) 1 1. approbations to Bishop (lilruour s 
bible history 3 11. preface pp. v-vi, text in 
English, pp. 7-56+, in Chinook Jargon, steno 
graphic characters, pp. 1-60+, 12. In course I 
of publication, and will contain 330 pages in j 
English and about 400 in Jargon. 

This work is an outcome of the enterprise 
of Father Le Jeune, of Kamloops, British j 
Columbia, who has transcribed Bishop Durieu s j 
Jargon translation of the bible history into the 
characters adopted by him for teaching his 
Indian charges to road and write ; a description 
of which will be found in this bibliography 
under his name. His notes have been repro 
duced by him, with the aid of the mimeograph, 
on sheets the size of those in the edition of the 
bible history in English, with which they have I 
been interleaved. When finished it will be j 
issued in an edition of 200, that number of j 
copies of the edition iu English having been \ 
furnished by Father St. Onge, of Troy, N. Y. 

Copies Keen : Pilling. 

I have in my library a copy of each of two 
editions of a "Chinook Vocabulary," with j 
imprints of 1886 ami 1892, on the respective title j 
pages of which appears the name of Bishop 
Durieu. These I had placed under his name, 



Durieu (P.) Continued. 

but in a letter to me, dated November 16, 1892, 
the bishop modestly disclaims their authorship, 
which he attributes to Father J. M. K. 
Le Jeune, under whose name, with accompa 
nying explanations, they will be found in this 
bibliography. 

See Le Jeune (J. M. R. ) 

The Rev. A. G. Morice, of Stuart s Lake 
Mission, British Columbia, a famous Athapas 
can scholar, has kindly furnished me the fol 
lowing brief account of this writer : 

" Bishop Paul Durieu was born at St. Pal-de- 
Mous, in the diocese of Puy, France, December 
3, 1830. After his course in classics he entered 
the no vitiate of the Oblates at Notre Dame de 
1 Ozierin 1847 and made his religious profession 
in 1849. Re was ordained priest at Marseilles 
March 11, 1854, and was sent to the missions of 
Oregon, where he occupied, successively, sev 
eral posts. At the breaking out of the rebellion 
among the Yakama Indians he had to leave for 
the Jesuit mission at Spokane. He was after 
wards sent to Victoria and then to Okanagan 
by his superiors. Thence he was sent as 
superior of the Fort Rupert Mission, and when, 
on June 2, 187f>, he was appointed coadjutor 
bishop of British Columbia, he was superior of 
St. Charles House at New Westminster. On 
June 3, 1890, lie succeeded Bishop L. T. D Her- 
bainez as vicar apostolic of British Columbia. 

11 He understands but does not speak several 
Salishan dialects, and he is especially noted for 
his unqualified success among the Indians." 



E. 



Eames : This word following a title or within par 
entheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler in the library of Mr. Wilberforce Eames, 
New York City. 

Eells: This word following a title or within paren 
theses after a note indicates that a copy of the 
work referred to has been loaned to me for 
collation and description by Rev. Myron Eells. 
Union City, Mason County, Washington. 

Eells (Rep. Myron). How languages grow. 

In the Advance, March 25 and July 8, 1875, 

Chicago, 1875, folio. (*) 

Relates wholly to the Chinook Jargon. 

Title and note furnished by Mr. Eells. 

Art. IV. The Twaua Indians of the 

Skokomish reservation. By Rev. M. 
Eells, Missionary among these Indians. 

In Hayden (F. V.i, Bulletin, vol. 3, pp. 57-114, 
Washington, 1877, 8. (Pilling.) 

Four songs in Chinook, with English trans 
lations, pp. 91-92. 

Issued separately with cover title as follows : 

Author s edition. | Department of 

the interior. | United States geological 



Eells (M.) Continued. 

and geographical survey. | F. V. Hay- 
den, II. S. Geologist-iii -Charge. | The | 
Twana Indians | of the | Skokomish 
reservation in Washington territory. | 
By | rev. M. Eells, | missionary among 
these Indians. | Extracted from the 
bulletin of the survey, Vol. Ill, No. 1. | 

Washington, April 9, 1877. 

Cover title as above, no inside title, text pp. 
57-114, 8. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 

Copies seen: Brinton, Eames, National 
Museum, Pilling. 

Hymns | in the | Chinook Jargon 

Language | compiled by | rev. M. 
Eels[,s /c], | Missionary of the American 
Missionary Association. | [Vignette.] | 

Portland, Oregon : | publishing house 
of Geo. H. Himes. | 1878. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso 
copyright notice (1878) 1 1. note p. 15, text pp. 4- 
30, sq. 16^. 

Hymns (alternate pages Jargon, with Eng 
lish headings, and English translation), pp. 4- 



26 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Eells (M.) Continued. 

27. Lord s prayer, with interlinear English 
translation, pp. 28-29. Blessing before meals, 
with interlinear English translation, p. 30. 

Copies seen: Dunbar, Eames. Georgetown, 
Piling, Wellesley. 

Hymns | in the | Chinook-)- Jargon-f- 
Language | compiled by | rev. M. 
Eells | Missionary of the American Mis 
sionary Association. | Second edition. | 
Revised and Enlarged. | 

Portland, Oregon : | David Steel, suc 
cessor to Himes the printer, | 169-171 
Second Street, | 1889. 

Cover title as above verso note, title as above 
verso copyright notice (1878 and 1889) 1 l.note 
p. 3, text pp. 4-40, sq. 16^. 

Hymns (alternate pages Jargon, with Eng 
lish headings and English translation), pp. 4- 
31. Hymn in the Twaua or Skokomisb lan 
guage, p. 32; English translation, p. 33. Hymn 
in the Clallam language, p. 34; English trans 
lation, p. 35. Hymn in the Nisqually language, 
p. 36; English translation, p. 37. Medley in 
four languages (Jargon. Skokomisli, Clallam, 
and English), p. 36; English translation, p. 37. 
Lord s prayer in Jargon, with interlinear Eng 
lish translation, pp. 38~:!9. Blessing before 
meals, in Jargon, with interlinear English 
translation, p. 40. 

Copies seen : Eames. Pilling, Wellesley . 

The Twana language of Washington 

territory. By rev. M. EelLs. 

In American Antiquarian, vol. 3, pp. 296-303. 
Chicago. 1880-1881. 8. (Bureau of Ethnology.) 

A grammatic treatise upon several Indian 
languages of Washington Territory, among 
them the Chinook Jargon, p. 303. 
The Chinook Jargon. 

In the Seattle Weekly Post-Intelligencer, 
vol. 1, no. 52, p. 4, column 8, Seattle, Washington 
Ty., September 29, 1882. (Pilling.) 

Explains the origin of "that miserable 
Chinook," defends it as a useful intertribal 
language and for intercourse between the 
Indians and white men, gives the derivation of 
several words of the language and some gram 
matic notes. 

History of | Indian missions | on the 

Pacific coast. | Oregon, Washington 
and Idaho. | By | rev. Myron Eells, | 
Missionary of the American Missionary 
Association. | With | an introduction 
| by | rev. G. H. Atkinson, D.D. | 

Philadelphia : the American Sunday- 
school union, | 1122 Chestnut Street. | 
10 Bible house, New York. [1882.] 

Frontispiece, title verso copyright (1882) ] 1. 
dedication verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-vi, 
introduction by G. H. Atkinson pp. vii-xi, pref 
ace (dated October, 1882) pp. xiii-xvi, text pp. 
17-270, 12. 



Eells (M.) Continued. 

Chapter v, Literature, science, education 
morals, and religion (pp. 202-226), contains a 
short list of books, papers, and manuscripts 
relating to the Indians of the. northwest coast, 
among them the Chinook and Chinook Jargon, 
pp. 203-207, 209-211. 

Copies seen: Congress. Pilling. 

- Ten years | of j missionary work | 
among the Indians | at | Skokomish, 
Washington territory. | 1874-1884. | By 
Rev. M. Eells, | Missionary of the 
American Missionary Association. | 

Boston : | Congregational Sunday- 
School Publishing Society, | Congrega 
tional house, | Corner Beacon and Som 
erset Streets. [1886.] 

Half-title (Ten years at Skokomish) verso 
blank 1 1. frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 
(1886) and names of printers 1 1. preface 1 1. 
dedication verso note 1 1. contents pp. vii-x, 
introduction pp. 11-13, text pp. 15-271, 12. 

Hymn (three verses) in Chinook Jargon, 
with English translation, pp. 248-249. Speci 
men lines of a Jargon hymn, pp. 253-254. 

Copies seen : Congress, Pilling. 

Indians of Puget Sound. (Sixth 
paper.) Measuring and valuing. 

In American Antiquarian, vol. 10, p. 174-178, 
Chicago, 1888, 8. (Bureau of Ethnology.) 

IsTumerals, and remarks concerning the 
numeral system of quite a number of the lan 
guages of Washington Territory, among them 
the Chinook. 

The preceding articles of the series, all of 
which appeared in the American Antiquarian, 
j contain no linguistic material. It was the 
intention of the editor of the Antiquarian, 
when the series should be finished, to issue 
them in book form. So far as they were 
printed in the magazine they were repaged and 
perhaps a number of signatures struck off. 
The sixth paper, for instance, titled ahove, I 
have in my possession, paged 44-48. 

The Twana, Chemakum, and Klallam 
Indians of Washington Territory. By 
Rev. Myron Eells. 

In Smithsonian Institution, Annual Kept, of 
the Board of Regents for 1887, part i r pp. 605- 
681, Washington, 1889, 8. (Pilling.) 

Xumerals 1-10 of a number of Indian lan 
guages of Washington Territory, among them 
the Chinook Jargon, p. 644. Remarks on the 
same, p. 645. Three words of the Chinook Jar 
gon not found in Gibbs s dictionary, p. 652. 
Word for God in Twana, Nisqually, Klallam, 
and Chinook, p. 679. 

"The Chinook Jargon has been ably com 
piled by Hon. G. Gibbs. I know of but three 
words in this locality of Indian origin which 
are not in his dictionary. . . (Jut of about 
800 words and phrases which answer for words 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



27 



Bells (M.) Continued. 

given by him, only about 470 are used here j 
which shows how the same language will vary | 
in different localities." 

This article was issued separately, also, j 
without change. And again as follows : 

The Twana, Chemakum, and Klallam 

Indians of Washington territory. By 
Rev. Mvrou Eells. 

In Smithsonian Institution, Misc. Papers j 
relating to anthropology, from the Smithsonian j 
report for 1886- 87, pp. 605-681, Washington, j 
1889,8. (Eaines, Pilling.) 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 

Aboriginal geographic names in the 

state of Washington. By Myron Eells. j 

In American Anthropologist, vol. 5, pp. 27- \ 
35, Washington, 1892, 8. (Pilling. ) 

Arranged alphabetically and derivations 
given. The languages represented are: Chin- i 
ook, Chinook Jargon, Nez Perce, Chehalis, | 
Clallam, Twana, Calispel, Cayuse, Puyallup, 
and Spokane. 

[Dictionary of the Chinook Jar- | 

gon.] (*) 

Under date of January 9, 1893, Mr. Eells 
writes me, concerning this work, as follows : 

I have been at work for the last ten mouths, 
as I have had spare time, on a Chinook Jargon- 
English and English-Chinook Jargon Diction 
ary, with introduction, remarks about the lan 
guage, and grammar. I am gathering all the 
words I can find, whether obsolete or not, from | 
about fifteen Chinook dictionaries which have I 
been issued since 1838 with the various spell- j 
ings, marking, as far as I can, all those now in 
use; also introducing all which have been 
adopted into the language of late years from the 
English and all phrases which can be used as [ 
words. I have gone through with the English- I 
Chinook part and have nearly three thousand 
words ; have gone through with the Chinook- 
English part except S and T and have about 
two thousand ; I hope to finish it this winter, 
though it is much more of a task than I sup 
posed it would be when I began. I hardly 
expect it will ever be published, but will keep 
it in manuscript, having done it largely to pre 
serve the language in its present transitional 
form, which is quite different from what it was 
thirty or forty years ago. 

"I hardly know whether it is worth while for 
you to mention this, as it is in such an unfin 
ished state; still I have even now put far more 
work on it than I have on all my other Chinook 
Jargon writings." 

[Words, phrases and sentences in 

the Chinook Jargon.] (*) 

Manuscript in possession of its author. 
Recorded in a copy of Powell s Introduction to 
the study of Indian languages, second edition, 
pp. 77-103,105,109-111,113-125, 127,129,132-188, 
189-227. On p. 228 is a translation of John iii 10. 



Eells (M.) Continued. 

[Sermons in the Chinook Jar 
gon.] (*) 

Manuscript, 26 pages, 8, in possession of its 
author. 

"About 16 years ago, in 1875, when I was 
learning to talk the language, I wrote four ser 
mons in the Chinook Jargon which I still have. 
Since that time L have preached a great deal in 
the language, but do it so easily that I simply 
make a few headings in English and talk 
extempore. On looking over these sermons I 
find that were I to use them again I should 
need to revise them and to change many 
expressions so as to make them clearer." 

Titles and notes of these three manuscripts 
furnished me by Mr. Eells. 

See Buhner (T. S.) 

Rev. Myron Eells was born at Walker s 
Prairie, Washington Territory, October 7, 1843; 
lie is the son of Rev. dishing Eells, D. D., and 
Mrs. M. F. Eells, who went to Oregon in 1838 as 
missionaries to the Spokane Indians. He left 
Walker s Prairie in 1848 on account of the 
Whitman massacre at Wallawalla and Cayuse 
war, and went to Salem, Oregon, where he began 
to go to school. In 1849 he removed to Forest 
Grove, Oregon ; in 1851 to Hillsboro, Oregon, and 
in 1857 again to Forest Grove, at which places 
he continued his school life. In 1862 he removed 
to Wallawalla, spending the time in farming 
and the wood business until 1868, except the 
falls, winters, and springs of 1863- 64, 1864- 65, 
and 1865- 66, when he was at Forest Grove* in 
college, graduating from Pacific University in 
1866, in the second class which ever graduated 
from that institution. In 1868 he went to 
Hartford, Conn., to study for the ministry, 
entering the Hartford Theological Seminary 
that year, gi-aduating from it in 1871, and being 
ordained at Hartford, June 15, 1871, as a Cou- 
gregatioral minister. He went to Boise City 
in October, 1871, under the American Home 
Missionary Society, organized the First Con 
gregational church of that place in 1872, and 
was pastor of it until he left in 1874. Mr. Eells 
was also superintendent of its Sunday school 
from 1872 to 1874 and president of the Idaho 
Bible Society from 1872 to 1874. He went to 
Skokomish, Washington, in June, 1874, and has 
worked as missionary of the American Mis 
sionary Association ever since among the Sko 
komish or Twana, and Clallam Indians ; pastor 
of Congregational church at Skokomish Reser 
vation since 1876, and superintendent of Sun 
day school at Skokomish since 1882. He 
organized a Congregational church among the 
Clallams in 1882, of which he has since been 
pastor, and another among the whites at Sea- 
beck in 1880, of which he was pastor until 1886. 
In 1887 he was chosen trustee of the Pacific 
University, Oregon ; in 1885 was elected assist 
ant secretary and in 1889 secretary of its board 
of trustees. He delivered the address before 
the Gamma Sigma society of that institution in 



28 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Eells (M.) Continued. 

1876, before the alumni in 1890, and preached 
the baccalaureate sermon in 1886. In 1888 he 
was chosen trustee of Whitman College, Wash 
ington, delivered the commencement address 
there in 1888, and received the degree of D.D. 
from that institution in 1890. In 1888 he was 
elected its financial secretary, and in 1891 was 
ashed to become president of the institution, 
hut declined both. 

He was elected an associate member of the 
Victoria Institute of London in 1881, and a 
corresponding member of the Anthropological 
Society at Washington in 1885, to both of which 
societies he lias furnished papers which have 
been published by them. He was also elected 
vice-president of the Whitman Historical 
Society at Wallawalla in 1889. From 1874 to 
188 6 he was clerk of the Congregational Asso 
ciation of Oregon and Washington. 

Mr. Kells at present (1893) holds the position 
of superintendent of the department of ethnol 
ogy for the State of AVashmgton at the World s 
Columbian Exposition. 

Emmons ( George Falconer) . Replies to 
inquiries respecting the Indian tribes 
of Oregon and California. By George 
Falconer Emnions, U. S. N. 

In Schoolcraft (H. R.), Indian Tribes, vol. 3. 
pp. 200-225, Philadelphia, 1853, 4. 

Vocabulary of the Clatsop dialect (about 40 
words), pp. 223-224. 

"Many words in this language, I piesume, 
are common to the Chinook language, and per 
haps to the Chickeelis and Kilamukes, who mix 
with and appear to understand each other. 

Everette (Dr. Willis Eugene). Compar 
ative literal translation of the " Lord s 
Prayer" in the T^iriuk or Chinook Jar 
gon with English. (*) 

Manuscript; recorded " from personal 
knowledge of the language. Written at Chil- 
cat, Alaska, 1884. Corrected word by word by 
Sitka and Chilcat Indians." 

Comparative literal translation of 

the Ten Commandments in the T^iriuk 
or Chinook Jargon with English. (*) 

Manuscript; recorded "from personal 
knowledge of the language. Written at Pyra 
mid Harbor, Alaska, in May, 1884, and cor 
rected word by word by repeating to Chilcat, 
Sitka, and British Columbia Indians until they 
were thoroughly satisfied with each word and 
its meaning, as well as a full understanding of 
each sentence." 

A Dictionary of the Language of the 

"Kliukit VKlingi t) or Chilcat Indians 
of Alaska, together with that of the 
T^iiink, or Chinook Trade Jargon used 
on the North American Pacific Coast 
compared with English. (*) 



Everette (W. E.) Continued. 

Manuscript; 1,000 words, alphabetically 
arranged. Recorded " from personal knowledge 
of the language, and corrected word by word 
by the Indian trader, Air. Dickinson, and 
Chilcat and Sitka Indians, during April, 1884, 
at Pyramid Harbor. Alaska. 

Titles and notes concerning the above manu 
scripts furnished by the author. 

Hymn in the Chinook Jargon as 
sung by the Indians of Lake Chehm, 
Washington territory, U. S. A. 

Manuscript, 1 leaf, 4, in the library of the 
Bureau of Ethnology. 

The hymn, which is written in black ink, is 
accompanied by an English interlinear trans 
lation in red. 

The Lord s Prayer | in | Chinook 

Jargon | as spoken by the Indian Tribes 
that live on the Pacific coast of West 
ern Oregon, U. S. A. 

Manuscript, 1 leaf, 4, in the library of the 
Bureau of Ethnology. 

The prayer in Jargon is written in black, 
with an English interlinear translation in red. 

The two last mentioned manuscripts were 
transmitted to the Bureau of Ethnology from 
the Takaina Indian Agency, August 15, 1883. 

From notes kindly furnished me by the sub 
ject of this sketch, 1 have compiled the follow 
ing: 

Dr. AVillis Eugene Everette was born in 
Brooklyn, New York, in 1855. He was placed 
under the care of tutors at an early age, and 
when his parents died, at the close of the war, 
he began to plan for his own education and 
future life work. After eight years of study 
under private tutors and in various schools of 
learning, he resolved to attempt to investigate 
the origin of the aboriginal i-aces of North 
America. He went direct into the field among 
the Indians of the western shores of Hudson 
Bay, where he wintered. Here he began study 
ing the languages, manners, and customs of the 
Cree, Athabasca, and Chippewa. Thence he 
journeyed amongst the Saulteux, Blood, Piegan, 
and Black feet; the Sioux, Gros-Ventres, Man- 
dan, Assiniboiue, and Crow; the Paiute and 
Klamath people; the Rogue River, Alzea, and 
Siletx Indians ; the Umatilla and Nez Perce 
people; the Klikitat and Yakima tribes; the 
Indians of Puget Sound : thence up along the 
British Columbia coast to Chilcat, Alaska, 
where the Tlinkit, Sheetkah, and other Alaskan 
races were found; thence across the main 
range of Alaska into the headwaters of the 
Yukon River, and down the Yukon throughout 
the interior of Alaska to the Arctic sea coast, 
among the Kutcha-Kutchin. Ivvichpatshi, and 
Yukoniyut people, of the valley of the Yukon 
River and seacoast of Norton Sound; and, 
finally, down to the Aleutian Archipelago, 
among the Aleuts of Unalaska, thus com 
pleting a chain of investigation from the 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES 



29 



Everette (W. E.) Continued. 

northern extremities of the Ignited States and 
along the Pacific coast to the northwestern 
part of North America. From time to time he 
returned to civilization for the purpose of 
making studies in geology, medicine, chem 
istry, law, and mineralogy. 

He is now writing up his numerous explora 
tions as fast as his mining and law practice 
will permit. He has several hundred manu 
scripts, personally collected, of the langiiages, 



Eveiette (W. E.) Continued. 

manners, customs, and traditions of the North 
American aborigines, and is in hopes that some 
day he will have leisure enough to reduce them 
into a set of about ten quarto \olumes. 
Although mining geology and mining law is 
his profession, his actual life work has been the 
study of the anthropology of our North Ameri 
can aborigines, and he devotes all his spare 
time to the latter. His present location is 
Tacoma,~\Yashington. 



F. 



Featherman (A.) Social history | of the 
| races of mankind, j First division: | 
Nigritians[-Third division: | Aoneo- 
Maranonians] . | By | A. Featherman. | 
[Two lines quotation.] | 

London : JTriibner & co.,Ludgate Hill. 
1 1885 [-1889]. | (All rights reserved.) 

3 vols. 8. 

A general discussion of a number of North 
American families of speech occurs in volume 
3, among them the Chinook, which occupies pp. 
369-378, and which includes a brief account of 
their language on p. 373. 

Copies seen : Congress. 

Field (Thomas Warren). An essay | 
towards an | Indian bibliography. | 
Being a catalogue of books, relating 
to the | history, antiquities, languages, 
customs, religion, | wars, literature, 
and origin of the | American Indians, 
| in the library of | Thomas W. Field. 
| With bibliographical and historical 
notes, and | synopses cf the contents of 
some of | the works least known. | 

New York: | Scribuer, Armstrong, 
and co. | 1873. 

Title verso names of printers 1 1. preface pp. 
iii-iv, text pp. 1-430, 8. 

Titles and descriptions of work sin or relating 
to the Chiuookan languages passim. 

Copies seen : Congress, Eames. Pilling. 

At the Field sale, no. 688, acopy brought $4.25; 
attheMenzies sale. no. 718, a " half crushed, red 
leA T ant morocco, gilt top, uncut copy," brought 
$5.50. Priced by Leclerc, 1878, 18 fr. ; by Quar- 
iteh. no. 11996. 15s. ; at the Pinart sale.no. 368, 
it brought 17 fr. ; at the Murphy sale, no. 949, 
$4.50. Priced by Quaritch, no. 30224, II. 

Catalogue | of the | library | belong 
ing to | Mr. Thomas W. Field. | To be 
sold at auction, | by | Bangs, Merwin 
& co., | May 24th, 1875, | and following 
days. | 

New York. | 1875. 

Cover title 22 lines, title as above verso blank 
1 1. notice etc. pp. iii-viii, text pp. 1-376, list of 



Field (T. W.) Continued. 

prices pp. 377-393, supplement pp. 1-59, 8. Com 
piled by Mr. Joseph Sabin, mainly from Mr. 
Field s Essay, title of which is given above. 

Contains titles of a number of works in and 
relating to the Chinookan languages. 

Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Con 
gress, Eames. 

At the Squier sale, no. 1178, an uncut copy 
brought $1.25. 

Ford: This word following a title or inclosed 
within parentheses after a note indicates that 
a copy of the Avork referred to has been seen by 
the compiler, belonging to the library of Mr. 
Paul L. Ford, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fraiichere (Gabriel). Relation | cl im | 
voyage | a la cote du | nord-ouest | de 
| I Amerique Septentrionale, | dans les 
anne"es | 1810, 11, 12, 13, et 14. | Tar G. 
Franchere, fils. j 

Montreal : | de Timprimerie de C. B. 
Pasteur. | 1820. 

Half-title (Relation d un voyage) verso blank 
1 1. title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. 5-6, avant 
propos pp. 7-10, text pp. 11-284, 8. 

Quelques mots (46) de la langue Chinouque 
ou Tchinouk,pp. 204-205. Eleven phrases in 
the same, p. 205. 

Copies seen : Georgetown, Jacques Cartier 
School, Mallet. 

Narrative | of a | voyage | to | the 

northwest coast of America | in the 
years 1811, 1812, 1813, and 1814 | or the | 
first American settlement on the Pacific 
| By Gabriel Franchere | Translated 
and edited by J. V. Huntington | 
[Vignette] | 

Red field | 110 and 112 Nassau street, 
New York | 1854. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright and 
name of stereotyper 1 1. preface to the second 
edition pp. 3-7, preface [in English-] to the 
French edition pp. 9-10, contents pp. 11-16, in 
troduction pp. 17-22, text pp. 23-376, 16. 

A brief reference to the Chinook language, 
p. 262. The vocabulary and phrases are omitted 
in this edition. 



30 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Franchere (G. ) Continued. 

Copies seen : British Museum, Congress, 
Georgetown, Mallet, Pilling, Trumbull. 

Gabriel Franchere was born on November 3, 
1786, in Montreal, -where his father hail estab- i 
lished himself as a merchant. His early life ! 
appears to have been spent at school and 
behind his father s counter. 

In the spring of 1810 Franchere sought 
employment in the Pacific Fur Company, and 
on May 24 he signed articles of engagement 
with one of the company s partners. By this i 
agreement he bound himself to the service of j 
the company, as a clerk, for five years. In July ; 
he left home, with a number of his young com- i 
patriots, in canoes for New York. 

The Pacific Fur Company was equipping | 
two expeditions for the Columbia country 
one overland, from St. Louis, and the other by 
sea, around Cape Horn, and Franchero was 
assigned to the party going by sea. September, 
1810, the ship Tonquin, Jonathan Thorn, lieu 
tenant TJ. S. Navy, master, set sail for the Pacific 
coast. On April 12 the party Avere landed on 
the south side of the Columbia, ten miles from 
its mouth, and the company s principal port, 
called Astoria, was founded. 

Franchere exhibited a wonderful talent for 
acquiring the Indian languages of the country, 
and otherwise made himself so useful that he 
was retained at headquarters most of the 
time, although he made a number of excursions 
up the Columbia, the Cowlitz, and the Willa 
mette. 

After the disbandment of the Pacific Fur Com 
pany he entered temporarily into the service of 
the Northwest Company; but, although bril- 



Fraiichere (G. ) Continued. 

liant offers were made to him, as soon as oppor 
tunity offered he determined to return to 
Montreal by the Canadian overland route up the 
Columbia, across the Rocky Mountains through 
the Athabasca Pass, down the Athabasca, 
across the marshes, down the Saskatchewan, 
across Lake "Winnipeg, up Winnipeg and 
Rainy rivers, down the Kaministiqua, across 
Lakes Superior and Huron, up the French 
River, across the height of lands at Lake Nipis- 
sing, down the Mattawan, and finally down the 
Ottawa to the St. Lawrence, a distance of five 
thousand miles, traveled in canoes and on foot. 
He appeared under the paternal roof on the 
evening of September 1, 1814, greatly to the 
surprise of his family, who had received no 
intelligence of him since he had left New York, 
four years previously, and who mourned him 
as dead, since they imagined he had perished 
in the ill-fated Touquin, off the coast of New 
Caledonia. 

Franchere removed to Sault Ste. Marie with 
his young family in 1834 and engaged in the 
fur trade. Later he became a partner in the 
noted commercial house of P. Choteau, Son & 
Co., of St. Louis, and later still he established 
himself in New York City as the senior partner 
in the firm of G. Franchere &. Co. 

He died at the residence of his son-in-law, 
Hon. John S. Prince, mayor of St. Paul, Minn., 
at the age of seventy years, the last survivor 
of the celebrated Astor expeditions. Mallet, in 
Catholic Annual, 1887. 

Frost (J. H.) See Lee (D.) and Frost 
(J.H.) 



G. 



Gairdner (Dr. ). Notes on the Geog 
raphy of the Columbia River. By the 
late Dr. Gairdner. 

In Royal Geog. Soc. Jour. vol. 11, pp. 250-257, 
London. 1841, 8. (Congress.) 

Notes on the Indian tribes of the upper and ! 
lower Columbia, pp. 255-256, contains a list of 
the peoples of that locality, with their habitat, 
among them the divisions of the Chinook. 

G-alla tin (Albert). A synopsis of the In- j 
dian tribes within the United States j 
east of the Rocky Mountains and in i 
the British and Russian possessions in 
North America. By the lion. Albert j 
Gallatin. 

In American Antiquarian Soc. Trans, j 
( Archaeologia Americana), vol. 2, pp. 1-422, Cam- j 
bridge, 1836,8. 

A vocabulary of 33 words, and the numerals | 
1-12, 20, in Chinook (mouth of the Columbia), 
p. 379. 



Gallatin (A.) Continued. 

Male s Indians of North-west Amer 
ica, and vocabularies of North America ; 
with an introduction. By Albert Gal 
latin. 

In American Ethnological Soc. Trans, vol. 2, 
pp. xxiii-clxxxviii, 1-130, New York, 1848, 8. 

General account of the Tsinuk, or Chinooks, 
pp. 15-17. The Tshinuk family (pp. 56-58) 
includes pronunciation, p. 56; personal pronouns 
of the Watlala, p. 56; possessive pronouns, 
p. 57; partial conjugation of the verb to be cold, 
p. 57 ; transitive inflections, p. 58 ; pluralizat ion 
of nouns in the Waiwaikum, p. 58. The "Jar 
gon "or trade language of Oregon (pp. 62-70) 
includes a general account of the language, pp. 
62-64; Jargon words (41) derived from the 
English, p. 64 ; derived from the French (33), p. 
05; formed by onomatopoeia (12), p. 65; alpha 
betical English meaning of the words of the 
Jargon (165), p. 66 ; grammatic treatise, pp. 66-70. 
"All the words thus brought together and 
combined in this singularly constructed speech 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



31 



Gallatin (A.) Continued. 

[Jargon] are about two hundred and fifty in 
number. Of these, .110, including the numer 
als, are from the Tshinuk, 17 from thelSlootkas, 
38 from either the one or the other, but doubt 
ful from which; 33 from the French, and 41 
from the English. These two last are sub 
joined, as well as the words formed by onoma 
topoeia; and an alphabetical English list of all 
the other words is added, which will show of 
what materials the scanty vocabulary consists. 
Vocabulary of the lower Chinook (179 words) , 
pp. 89-95. Vocabulary of the Watlala (60 
words), p. 121. 

Table of generic Indian families of 

languages. 

In Schoolcraft (H. R.), Indian tribes, vol. 3, 
pp. 397-402, Philadelphia, 1853, 4. 

Includes the Tshinook, p. 402. 

Albert Gallatin was born in Geneva, Switzer 
land, January 29, 1761, and died in Astoria, L. I., 
August 12, 1849. He was descended from an 
ancient patrician family of Geneva, whose name 
had long been honorably connected with the 
history of Switzerland. Young Albert had 
been baptized by the name of Abraham Alfonso 
Albert. In 1773 he was sent to a boarding 
school and a year later entered the University 
of Geneva, where he was graduated in 1779. He 
sailed from I/Orient late in May, 1780, and 
reached Boston on July 14. He entered Con 
gress on December 7, 1795, and continued a 
member of that body until his appointment as 
Secretary of the Treasury in 1801, which office 
he held continously until 1813. His services 
were rewarded with the appointment of min 
ister to France in February, 1815 ; he entered 
on the duties of this office in January, 1816. In 
1826, at the solicitation of President Adams, he 
accepted the appointment of envoy extraordi 
nary to Great Britain. On his return to the 
United States ho settled in New York City, 
where, from 1831 to 1839, he was president of the 
National Bank of New York. In 1842 he was 
associated in the establishment of the American 
Ethnological Society, becoming its first presi 
dent, and in 1843 he was elected to hold a simi 
lar office in the New York Historical Society, an 
honor which was annually con ferred on him until 
his death. Appleton s Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

G-atschet : This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to lias been seen by the com - 
piler in the library of Mr. Albert S. Gatschet. 
Washington, D. C. 

Gatschet (Albert Samuel). Indian lan 
guages of the Pacific states and terri 
tories. 

In Magazine of American Hist. vol. 1, pp. 
145-171, New York, 1877, sm. 4. (Pilling.) 

Short account of the Chinook language and 
its dialects, p. 167. Same of the Chinook Jar 
gon, p. 168. 

Issued separately with half-title as follows : 



Gatschet (A. S.) Continued. 

Indian languages | of the j Pacific 

states and territories | by | Albert S. 
Gatschet | Reprinted from March [1877] 
Number of The Magazine of American 
History 

[New York: 1877.] 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 145-171, 
sm.4. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 

Copies seen : Astor, Eames, Pilling, Welles- 

ley. 

Reprinted in the following works : 

Beach (AV.AF.), Indian Miscellany, pp. 416- 
447, Albany, 1877, 8. 

Drake (S. G.), Aboriginal races of North 
America, pp. 748-763, New York, 1882, 8. 

A supplementary paper by the same author 
and with the same title, which appeared in the 
Magazine of American History, vol. 8, contains 
no Chinookan material. 

Vocabulary of the Clackama lan 
guage. 

Manuscript, 7 leaves, 4, in the library of the 
Bureau of Ethnology. Collected at the Grande 
Ronde Reserve, Yamhill Co., Oregon, in Decem 
ber, 1877, from Frank Johnson, a Clackama 
Indian, and recorded on one of the Smithsonian 
forms (no. 170) of 211 words. About 150 words 
and phrases are given. 

- "Words, phrases, and sentences in 
the Clackama language. 

Manuscript; recorded in a copy of Intro 
duction to the Study of Indian Languages, 1st 
edition. Material collected at Grande Ronde 
reservation, Yamhill County, Oregon, Decem 
ber, 1877. 

Vocabulary of the Wasco and Wac- 
cane"ssisi dialects of the Chinuk family. 

Manuscript, 7 pp. folio. Taken at the Kla- 
math Lake Agency, Oregon, in 1877. 

Albert Samuel Gatschet was born in St. Beat- 
enberg, in the Bernese Oberland, Switzerland, 
October 3, 1832. His propedeutic education was 
acquired in the lyceums of Neuchatel (1843- 
1845) and of Berne (1846-1852), after which he 
followed courses in the universities of Berne 
and Berlin (1852-1858). His studies had for 
their object the ancient world in all its phases of 
religion, history, language, and art, and thereby 
his attention was at an early day directed to 
philologic researches. In 1865 he, began the pub 
lication of a series of brief monographs on the 
local etymology of his country, entitled " Orts- 
etymologische Forschungen aus der Schweiz" 
(1865- 67). In 1867 he spent several months in 
London pursuing antiquarian studies in the 
British Museum. In 1868 he settled in New York 
and became a contributor to various domestic 
and foreign periodicals, mainly on scientific 
subjects. Drifting into a more attentive study 
of the American Indians, he published several 
compositions upon their languages, the most 



32 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Gatschet (A. S.) Continued. 

important of which is " Zwolf Sprachen aus 
dem Siidwesten Nordamerikas," Weimar, 187G. 
This led to his being appointed to the position 
of ethnologist in the United States Geological 
Survey, under Maj. John W. Powell, in March, 
1877, when he removed to Washington, and first 
employed himself in arranging the linguistic 
manuscripts of the Smithsonian Institution, 
now the property of the Bureau of Ethnology, 
which forms a part of the Smithsonian Institu 
tion. Mr. Gatschet has ever since been actively 
connected with that bureau. To increase its 
linguistic collections and to extend his own 
studies of the Indian languages, he has made 
extensive trips of linguistic and ethnologic 
exploration among the Indians of North Amer- j 
ica. After returning from a six months j 
sojourn among the Klamaths and Kalapuyas I 
of Oregon, settled on both sides of the Cascade j 
Range, he visited the Kataba in South Carolina j 
and the Cha hta and Shetimasha of Louisiana 
in 1881- 82, the Kayowo, Comanche, Apache, 
Tattassee, Caddo. Naktche, Modoc, and other 
tribes in the Indian Territory, the Tonkawe 
and Lipans in Texas, and the Atakapa Indians 
of Louisiana in 1884- 85. In 1886 he saw the 
Tlaskaltecs at Saltillo, Mexico, a remnant of the 
Xahua race, brought there about 1575 from 
Anahuac, and was tho first to discover the affin 
ity of the Biloxi language with the Siouaii fam 
ily. He also committed to Avriting the Tuni^ka 
or Tonica language of Louisiana, never before 
investigated and forming a linguistic family of 
itself. Excursions to other parts of the country 
brought to his knowledge other Indian lan 
guages : the Tuskarora, Caughnawaga, Penob- 
scot, and Karankawa. 

Mr. Gatschet has compiled an extensive 
report embodying his researches among the 
Klamath Lake and Modoc Indians of Oregon, 
which forms Vol. II of Contributions to North 
American Ethnology. Among the tribes and 
languages discussed by him in separate publi 
cations are the Timucua (Florida), Tonkawe 
(Texas), Yuina (California, Arizona, Mexico), 
Chumeto (California), Beothuk (^Tewfouud- 
land), Creek, and Hitchiti (Alabama). His 
numerous papers are scattered through the 
publications of the various learned societies, 
the magazines, and government reports. 

General discussion : 



Chinook 


See Bancroft (H. II.) 


Chinook 


Beach (W. W.) 


Chinook 


Berghaus (H.) 


Chinook 


Brinton (D. G.) 


Chinook 


Duncan (I).) 


Chinook 


Eells (M.) 


Chinook 


Featherman (A.) 


Chinook 


Gallatin (A.) 


Chinook 


Gatschet (A. S.) 


Chinook 


Hale (H.) 


Chinook 


Sproat (G.M.) 


Chinook 


Whymper (F.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Bancroft (H. H.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Beach (W. W.) 



General discussion Continued. 

Chinook Jargon See Clough (J. C.) 

Chinook Jargon Drake (S.G.) 

Chinook Jargon Eells (M.) 

Chinook Jargon Gatschet (A. S.) 

Chinook Jargon Haines (E. M.) 

Chinook Jargon Hale(H.) 

Chinook Jargon Nicoll (E. H.) 

Chinook Jargon Eeade (J.) 

Chinook Jargon Sproat (G. M.) 

Chinook Jargon Swan ( J. G.) 

Chinook Jargon Western. 

Chinook Jargon Wilson (D.) 
G-eographic names : 

Chinook See Gibbs (G.) 

Geological Survey: These words following a title 
or within parentheses after a note indicate that 
a copy of the work referred to has been seen by 
the compiler in the library of the United States 
Geological Survey, Washington, D. C. 

Georgetown: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler in the library of Georgetown University, 
Washington, D. C. 

Gibbs ( Dr. George) . Smithsonian miscel 
laneous collections. 1 161 ] A | dictionary 
| of the | Chinook Jargon, | or | trade 
language of Oregon. | Prepared for the 
Smithsonian institution. | By | George 
Gibbs. | [Seal of the institution.] | 

Washington: | Smithsonian institu 
tion: | March, 1863. 

Title verso advertisement 1 1. contents p. iii, 
preface pp. v-xi, bibliography pp. xiii-xiv, half- 
title (Part I. Chinook-English) verso note 1 1. 
text pp. 1-29, half-title (Part II. English- 
Chinook) p. 31, text pp. 33-44, 8. 

General discussion of the language and its 
derivation, pp. v-viii. Short comparative 
vocabulary (eighteen words and phrases) of 
English, Tlaoquatch and Nutka, and Colum 
bian, p. ix. Analogies between the Chinook 
and other languages (Haeltzuk, Belbella, Clat- 
sop, Nutka, Cowlitz, Kwantlen, Selish, Chi- 
halis, ^sisqually, Yakama and Klikatat), p. x. 
Bibliography of the Chinook Jargon (sixteen 
entries), pp. xiii-xiv. Dictionary of the Chin 
ook Jargon: Chinook-English, pp. 1-29; Eng 
lish-Chinook, pp. 33-43. The Lord s prayer in 
Jargon, with interlinear English translation, p. 
[44]. 

Copies seen : Astor, Bancroft, Dunbar, 
Eames, Pilling, Trumbull, Wellesley. 

"Some years ago the Smithsonian Institu 
tion printed a small vocabulary of the Chinook 
Jargon, furnished by Dr. B. II. Mitchell, of the 
U. S. Navy, and prepared, as I afterwards 
learned, by Mr. Lionnet, a Catholic priest, for 
his own use while studying the language at 
Chinook Point. It was submitted by the Insti 
tution, for revision and preparation for the 
press, to the late Professor W. W. Turner. 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



33 



Gibbs (G. ) Continued. 

Although it received the critical examination 
of that distinguished philologist, and was of 
use in directing attention to the language, it 
was deficient in the number of words in use, 
contained u.any which did not properly belong 
to the Jargon, and did not give the sources 
from which the words were derived. 

"Mr. Hale had previously given a vocabulary 
and account of this Jargon in his Ethnography 
of the United States Exploring Expedition, 
which was noticed by Mr. Gallatin in the 
Transactions of the American Ethnological 
Society, vol. ii. He however fell into some 
errors in his derivation of the words, chiefly 
from ignoring the Chehalis element of the Jar 
gon, and the number of words given by him 
amounted only to about two hundred and fifty. 

"A copy of Mr. Lionnet s vocabulary having 
been sent to me with a request to make such 
corrections as it might require, I concluded not 
merely to collate the words contained in this 
and other printed and manuscript vocabularies, 
but to ascertain, so far as possible, the lan 
guages which had contributed to it, with the 
original Indian words. This had become the 
more important as its extended use by differ 
ent tribes had led to ethnological errors in the 
classing together of essentially distinct fami 
lies. Preface . 

Issued also with title-page as follows : 

A | dictionary | of the | Chinook 

Jargon, | or, | trade language of 
Oregon. | By George Gibbs. | 

New York: | Cramoisy press. | 1863. 

Half-title (Shea s Library of American Lin 
guistics. XII.) verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 
11. preface pp. v-xi, bibliography of the Chinook 
Jargon pp. xiii-xiv, half-title of part I verso 
note 1 1. Chinook-English dictionary pp. 1-29, 
half-title of part II verso blank 1 1. English- 
Chinook dictionary pp. 33-43, the Lord s prayer 
in Jargon p. [44], 8. 

Copies seen: Astor, Boston AthenaBum, 
Congress, Dunbar, Harvard, Lenox, Smith 
sonian, Trumbull, Wellesley. 

Some copies (twenty-five, I believe) were 
issued in large quarto form with no change of 
title-page. (Pilling, Smithsonian.) 

See Hale (H.) 

Alphabetical vocabulary | of the 

| Chinook language. | By | George 
Gibbs. | [Small design, with motto in 
Irish and Latin.] | 
New York : | Cramoisy press. | 1863. 
Title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. iii-v, orthog 
raphy p. vi, bibliography pp. vii-viii, text pp. 
9-23, 8. 

Vocabulary (English-Chinook), pp. 9-20. 
Local nomenclature, pp. 21-23. 

Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athenaeum, Brit 
ish Museum, Congress, Eames, Harvard, Lenox, 
Smithsonian, Trumbull, Wellesley. 
CHIN 3 



Gibbs (G.) Continued. 

Some copies contain a loose half-title (Shea s 
| library of American linguistics. | VIII.) 
inserted afterwards. (Lenox.) 

There was a small edition (twenty-five 
copies, I believe) issued in large quarto form, 
with title slightly changed, as follows : 

Alphabetical vocabulary | of the | 

Chinook language. | By | George 
Gibbs. | Published under the auspices 
of the Smithsonian institution. | 

New York : | Cramoisy press. | 1863. 

Title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. iii-v, 
orthography p. vi, bibliography pp. vii-viii, 
text pp. 9-23, 4. 

Vocabulary alphabetically arranged by 
English words, double columns, pp. 9-20. 
Local nomenclature, pp. 21-23. 

Copies seen : Eames, Lenox, Pilling, Smith 
sonian. 

Bibliography of the Chinook Jargon. 

In Gribbs (G.), Dictionary of the Chinook 
Jargon, pp. xiii-xiv, Washington, 1863, 8. 

Contains sixteen titular entries, chronolog 
ically arranged. 

Reprinted in the same work: New York, 18G3, 
8 and 4. titled above. 

Bibliography [of the Chinook lan 
guage] . 

In Gibbs (G.), Alphabetical vocabulary of the 
Chinook language, pp. vii-viii, ISTew York, 1863, 
8 and 4. 

Contains six titular entries only. 

Chinook Jargon Vocabulary. Com 
piled by Geo. Gibbs, Esq. 

Manuscript, 38 pages, 8, in the library of the 
Bureau of Ethnology. Recorded in a blank 
book ; alphabetically arranged by Jargon words. 
Contains 481 entries. 

George Gibbs, the son of Col. George Gibbs, 
was born on thelTth of July, 1815, at Sunswick, 
Long Island, near the village of Halletts Cove, 
now known as Astoria. At seventeen he was 
taken to Europe, where he remained two years. 
On his return from Europe he commenced the 
reading of law, and in 1838 took his degree of 
bachelor of law at Harvard University. In 1848 
Mr. Gibbs went overland from St. Louis to 
Oregon and established himself at Columbia. 
In 1854 he received the appointment of collector 
of the port of Astoria, which he held during 
Mr. Fillmore s administration. Later he 
removed from Oregon to Washington Territory, 
and settled upon a ranch a few miles from Fort 
Steilacoom. Here he had his headquarters for 
several years, devoting himself to the study of 
the Indian languages and to the collection of 
vocabularies and traditions of the northwest 
ern tribes. During a great part of the time 
he was attached to the United States Govern 
ment Commission in laying the boundary, as 
the geologist or botanist of the expedition. He 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Gibbs (G.) Continued. 

was also attached as geologist to the survey of 
a railroad route to the Pacific, under Major 
Stevens. In 1857 he was appointed to the 
northwest boundary survey under Mr. Archi 
bald Campbell, as commissioner. In 1860 Mr. 
Gibbs returned to New York, and in 1861 was 
on duty in Washington in guarding the Capital. 
Later he resided in "Washington, being mainly 
employed in the Hudson Bay Claims Commis 
sion, to which he was secretary. He was also 
engaged in the arrangement of a large mass of 
manuscript bearing upon the ethnology and 
philology of the American Indians. His services 
were availed of by the Smithsonian Institution 
to superintend its labors in this field, and to his 
energy and complete knowledge of the subject 
it greatly owes its success in this branch of the 
service. The valuable and laborious service 
which he rendered to the Institution was 
entirely gratuitous, and in his death that estab 
lishment as well as the caiise of science lost an 
ardent friend and an important contributor to 
its advancement. In 1871 Mr. Gibbs married 
his cousin, Miss Mary K. Gibbs, of Newport, 
B. I., and removed to New Haven, where he 
died on the 9th of April, 1873. 

[Gill (John Kaye).] Dictionary | of the 
| Chinook Jargon j with examples of | 
Use in Conversation. | (Compiled from 
all vocabularies, and greatly improved 
| by the addition of necessary words 
| never before published.) | Ninth 
edition. | 

Portland, Oregon : | published by J. 
K. Gill & co. | 93 First Street. [1882.] 

Cover title : A complete | dictionary | of the 
| Chinook Jargon. | English-Chinook and 
Chinook-English. | Ninth edition. | Revised, 
Corrected and Enlarged. | 

Portland, Oregon. | J. K. Gill & co., publish 
ers. | 1882. | Himes the printer. 

Cover title, title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. 
3-4, text pp. 5-62, 18. 

English and Chinook, double columns, 
alphabetically arranged, pp. 5-33. Numerals 
1-12, 20, 30, 100, 1000, p. 33, Chinook and Eng 
lish, alphabetically arranged, pp. 34-57. Con 
versations, pp. 58-60. The Lord s prayer, with 
interlinear English translation, pp. 61-62. 

Copies teen : Eames, Pilling. 

In the preparation of this dictionary Mr. 
Gill had, he informs me, the assistance of Eev. 
W. C. Chaltin. An eighth edition was pub 
lished in 1878, in continuation of those issued 
by the firm of S. J. McCormick (see Blanchet 
(F. N.), whose stock was purchased by the firm 
of which Mr. Gill was a member. Of that 
edition I have been unable to locate a copy. 

"The first attempt at publication of the 
trappers and traders Indian Jargon in use 
among the coast and interior tribes of the 
Northwest was made in 1825, by a sailor [John 
K. Jewitt] who was captured from the ship 



Gill ( J. K. ) Continued. 

Boston, which was surprised by the Indians at 
Nootka Sound, her captain and crew murdered, 
the sailor who issued his adventures under 
the title, The Captive in Nootka and later 
the Traders Dictionary, being the only sur 
vivor. 

" Several little books, mostly for traders use, 
have been printed in this Jargon. A worthy 
missionary [Rev. Myron Eells] published quite 
a number of hymns translated from English, iu 
Chinook, which has been the only use of the 
language in the field of belles-lettres. 

" The language of the native Indians is sel 
dom heard. The progressive English is forcing 
its way even into the lodges of the most savage 
tribes ; and many of the original Indian dialects 
of the coast, of which Chinook was the most 
important, have disappeared entirely, with the 
nations that spoke them. 

" Of the ancient languages of the Chinooka, 
but two hundred words are given in the present 
dictionary, the remainder being words from 
other coast tribes, Yakimas, Wascos, Nez 
Perc6s, and other tongues." Preface. 

Mr. Gill s statement in regard to the "first 
attempt at publication of the trappers and 
traders Indian Jargon," quoted above, needs a 
word of correction . Jewitt s work, first iss ued 
under the title of "A journal kept at Nootka 
Sound," Boston, 1807, contains no linguistic 
material. Later it was published with thetitlo 
"A narrative of the adventures and sufferings 
of John R. Jewitt," Middletown, Connecticut, 
1815, and went through a number of editions. 
This work does not contain a Jargon vocabu 
lary at all, but one in the Nootka language 
(Wakashan family). The work entitled "The 
Captive in Nootka" is not by Jewitt, but is a 
compilation from his work by S. G. Goodrich 
(Peter Parley), and was first issued, so far as I 
know, Philadelphia, 1832. It contains a few 
Nootka words and phrases passim, but no 
vocabulary. Of the Traders Dictionary, by 
Jewitt, of which Mr. Gill speaks, I have been 
unable to trace a single copy. 

[ ] Dictionary | of the | Chinook 

Jargon | with examples of | Its Use in 
Conversation, j Compiled from all exist 
ing vocabularies, and greatly | im 
proved by the addition of necessary | 
words never before published. | Tenth 
edition. | 

Portland, Oregon: | published by J. 
K. Gill & co. | 1884. 

Cover title : Gill s | complete dictionary | of 
the | Chinook Jargon. | English-Chinook and 
Chinook-English. | Tenth edition, | Ilevised, 
Corrected and Enlarged. | 

Portland, Oregon : | J. K. Gill <fc co., publish 
ers. | 1884. 

Cover title, title verso name of printer 1 1. 
preface signed J. K. Gill & co. pp. 5-6, text pp. 
7-60, 18. 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



35 



Gill (J. K.) Continued. 

English-Chinook dictionary, double columns, 
alphabetically arranged, pp. 7-32. Numerals, 
p. 32. Chinook-English dictionary, alphabeti 
cally arranged, pp. 33-54. Conversations, En 
glish-Chinook, pp. 55-58. Lord s prayer, with 
interlinear English translation, pp. 59-60. 

Copies seen : Boston Athenaeum, British 
Museum, Eames, Pilling. 

[ ] Dictionary | of the | Chinook Jar 
gon | with examples of | Use in Con 
versation. | (Compiled from all vocab 
ularies, and greatly im- | proved by 
the addition of necessary words | never 
before published.) ! Eleventh edition. | 

1887. | Portland, Oregon : | published 
by J. K. Gill & co., | Booksellers and 
Stationers. 

Cover title : Dictionary | of the | Chinook 
Jargon, | [Design] | English-Chinook and 
Chinook-English. [Eleventh edition. | Revised, 
Corrected and Enlarged. | 

Portland, Oregon: | J. K. Gill & co., publish 
ers. | 1887. 

Cover title, title verso blank 1 1. explanatory 
suggestions verso blank 1 1. preface (unsigned 
and dated Jan. 1, 1887) pp. 5-6, text pp. 7-60, 18. 

Linguistic contents as in tenth edition titled 
next above. 

Copies seen : Harvard. 

GilPs | dictionary | of the | Chinook 

Jargon | with examples of | Use in 
Conversation. [ (Compiled from all 
vocabularies, and greatly im- | proved 
by the addition of necessary words | 
never before published.) | Twefth edi 
tion. | 

1889. | Portland, Oregon : | published 
by J. K. Gill & co., | Booksellers and 
Stationers. 

Cover title: Gill s | dictionary | of the ] 
Chinook Jargon, | [Picture of an Indian.] | 
English - Chinook and Chinook - English. | 
Twelfth edition. | Eevised, Corrected and En 
larged. | 

Portland, Oregon: | J.K. Gill & co., publish 
ers. | 1889. | Swope & Taylor, printers. 

Cover title, title verso copyright (1889) 1 1. 
explanatory suggestions pp. 3-4, preface pp. 5- 
6, text pp. 7-63, 18. 

English-Chinook dictionary, double columns, 
alphabetically arranged, pp. 7-32. Numerals, 
p. 32. Chinook-English vocabulary, alphabet 
ically arranged, pp. 33-54. Conversation, Eng 
lish-Chinook, pp. 55-58. Lord s prayer in Jar 
gon, with interlinear English translation, pp. 
59-60. Appendix, English-Chinook, double 
columns, alphabetically arranged, pp. 61-63. 

Copies seen: Pilling. 

Gill s | dictionary | of the | Chinook 

Jargon | with examples of | Use in Con- 



Gill (J. K.) Continued, 
versation. | (Compiled from all vocab 
ularies, and greatly im- | proved by the 
addition of necessary words | never 
before published.) | Thirteenth edi 
tion. | 

Portland, Oregon : | Published by J. 
K. Gill & Co., | Booksellers and Sta 
tioners. | 1891. 

Cover title : Gill s dictionary | of the | 
Chinook Jargon. | [Picture of an Indian.] | 
English - Chinook and Chinook - English. | 
Thirteenth edition. | Revised, corrected and 
enlarged. | 

Portland, Oregon : | J. K. Gill & co., publish 
ers. | 1891. | S.C. Beach, printer. 

Cover title, title verso copyright (1891) 1 1. 
explanatory suggestions pp. 3-4, preface pp. 5- 
6, text pp. 7-63, 18. 

English-Chinook, double columns, alphabet 
ically arranged, pp. 7-32 . Numerals 1-12, 20, 
30, 100, 1000, p. 32. Chinook-English, alphabet 
ically arranged, pp. 33-54. Conversation, pp. 
55-58. The Lord s prayer, with interlinear 
English translation, pp. 58-60. Appendix, 
English-Chinook, pp. 61-63. 

Copies seen: Pilling. 

In response to certain inquiries of mine, Mr. 
Gill writes me, under date of November 19, 1891, 
as follows : 

"In your favor of October 27th you request 
us to siipply you with a copy of each edition of 
the Chinook Jargon which we have published, 
and also to state what we may be able in regard 
to the bibliography of the Chinookan languages. 

" So far as the Chinook Dictionary published 
by McCormick is concerned [see Blanchet (F. 
N.)], we doubt very nmch whether we could 
find, without advertising, a single copy of it at 
this time. We received from McCormick <fe 
Co. some dozens of them of different dates of 
publication, but uniform as to contents, when 
we bought the dictionary from them. "Weeither 
disposed of or destroyed them years ago. It is 
now about twelve years since we began the 
publication of our Dictionary of Chinook. The 
dictator of this letter compiled our dictionary 
and added hundreds of necessary words to the 
vocabiilary of the English- Chinook, which is 
yet quite insufficient as a dictionary for ordi 
nary civilized people, but more than equal to 
the demands of the Indians and settlers for 
whom it was intended. It is, at least, quite as 
extensive as need be, but not, perhaps, so well 
selected. I flatter myself that the dictionary 
we produced in 1878, which I believe was our 
earliest publication of it, was the first one 
based upon a right conception of the origin of 
many of the words comprising the Chinook 
vocabulary, and also a phonetic basis which 
should produce the form of all Chinook words 
and the simplest style corresponding to our 
method of writing English. "We have just 
issued a thirteenth edition of this dictionary, 



36 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Gill (J. K.) Continued. 

which corresponds with the last two. We also 
send you a copy of the ninth edition, which I 
believe represents the previous eight editions 
and the succeeding ones up to the eleventh. 
The work was stereotyped when we got out our 
first edition, and the only change has been in 
the preface and appendix. I have learned 
much about the Chinook Jargon and other 
Indian tongues since the compilation of the 
first dictionary, and if it were to be rewritten 
to-day I should make some very slight changes 
in the book. I do not think the changes 
required would affect more than twelve of the 
root- words of the Chinook, but I should make 
some research into the literature of the early 
part of this century and pass some time among 
the Indians most proficient in the Chinook to 
find if possible the words used intertribally for 
coyote, rock, fir, maple, mountain, hill, 
the names of different parts of the human 
body, its diseases, and many other subjects and 
things which must have been referred to by 
words in common use before the white people 
came to this region, but which the compilers 
of the early dictionaries seem to have entirely 
neglected. 

" When I began the compilation of our own 
it was only because we had to have a new edi 
tion of the dictionary. The head of our firm 
considered the old one was plenty good 
enough, and for that reason my labors in 
increasing the vocabulary, both Chinook and 
English, were greatly curtailed. His view of 
the matter was a business one, however, and 
mine the impracticable side of it. Probably 
within the time we have been publishing this 
dictionary (thirteen years) the Indians who 
were restricted to the use of Chinook in con 
versation with the settlers of the North Pacific 
coast have decreased more than one-half in 
number. A great portion of these have died 
or been killed by our enterprising settlers (the 
probable reason for this killing being that the 
Indians lived upon lands our people wanted ; 
an example which they have had before them 
since the settlement of Manhattan and which 
they have not been slow to follow). Chinook 
is becoming a joke on the Pacific coast. White 
people learn it for the sake of attempting to talk 
with Indians, who speak just as good English 
as their would-be patrons and interlocutors. 
The sale for the books slowly decreases also. 

"You are probably aware that during the 
last year a valuable book upon the Chinook was 
issued in London, written by Horatio Hale, 
M. A., F. B. S. C. It is the most ambitious 
publication on this subject which has ever 
been attempted, and to me it is a marvel that 
this work should have seen the light in Lon 
don, so remote from any apparent interest in, 
or knowledge of, the Chinook. If you have it 
you will find that Mr. Hale has followed nearly 
the same system of spelling as that I adopted 
a dozen years ago. I judge that my dictionary 
was his model, to some extent, from the fact 



Gill (J. K.) Continued. 

that he spells the word kloshe as I do; also 
klone, klook, etc., which in some of the other 
vocabularies have been spelled with a c 
instead of k and with a final se instead of 
she, and, in fact, three or four different ways 
of spelling for the same word. Mr. Hale uses 
kluh for the verb to tear, to rend, to ploiv, etc. 

" Now, this word, as I hear it spoken among 
the Indians, ends gutturally, and for that rea 
son I spelled it as I have heard it pronounced, 
klugh. Mr. Hale accents the last syllable of 
klahane and spells the last syllable nie, 
which would make his pronounciation of the 
word very different from mine. Mine, I know, 
is the common, in fact, universal expression. I 
am often moved to open a correspondence with 
Mr. Hale on the subject of his book because of 
his iconoclasui. He attempts to prove too much, 
as I believe, and would make it appear that 
Chinook did not exist as an intertribal language 
prior to its necessity for the use of the trapper 
and the trader. I am convinced of the contrary. 
Within the year I have talked with an Indian 
who was a man grown when Lewis and Clarke 
came to this country, and have his assurance 
that the Klikitat, Multnomah,Clatsop, Chinook, 
and other tribes all talked to each other in this 
ancient Volapuk upon matters of business or 
any other inter-tribal affairs, while each tribe 
had its own language. I have said something 
on this subject in the preface to our dictionary. 
Mr. Hale s book has given me much pleasure in 
reading over his collection of Chinook romantic 
songs and examples of the common use of the 
language. It is not strange if there should be 
a wide difference in the pronunciation and use 
of the language between San Francisco Bay 
and Sitka, between the mouth of the Columbia 
and the top of the Rocky Mountains. 

"Mr. Hale mentions one or two books or 
pamphlets which I have not seen, but shall 
take my first opportunity to procure, giving 
more space to the Chinook. 

I inclose you several books which I think 
you will be glad to get. . . . 

"You will see that none of these different 
books attempt to give the accent, and leave the 
learner entirely at a loss as to the force of 
the words. For instance, the Chinook word 
for blanket, pasesee (spelled in two or three 
ways by the different publishers), is properly 
pronounced with the accent on the second syl 
lable. You will see how very different the 
word becomes if you attempt to accent the first 
or last syllables. I can assure you that there 
are no differences in our publications of the 
Chinook dictionary excepting what I have 
referred to in the two examples sent you. The 
books from other sources which I send are the 
only editions which had appeared at the time 
I procured them and I think they have none of 
them been duplicated since." 

In response to criticism made by me in regard 
to the above, more especially of that portion of 
it relating to Jewitt s work (see under firat 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



37 



Gill (J. K.) Continued. 

Gill title above), Mr. Gill writes me, under date 
of October 6, 1892, as follows : 

"As to my argument that the Jargon was of 
an earlier date than 1820, 1 have to say that I 
went rapidly last evening through my copy of 
Jewitt s "Captive of Nootka" (1861), and 
found scattered through the following words, 
which I am sure have a relation more than 
accidental to the present Chinook. 

"Jewitt uses the word pow for the firing of a 
gun. He speaks of an edible root called qua- 
noose and another, yama, the latter doubtless 
a form of kamas and the former probably of 
kottse, both of which roots are still eaten by 
many of our primitive Indians. Tyee is identical 
with the present word for the deity or any 
thing great. Pelth-pelth is evidently pil-pil; 
peshak (bad) is also identical. Three other words 
used by Jewitt, kutsak, quahootze, and ahwelth, 
are all rather familiar to me in sound, and if I 
had time to hunt them up I believe I could 
connect two of them with Chinook readily. 

"Now, I do not claim that the Chinook Jar 
gon originated at the mouth of the Columbia 
River, where the Chinook Indians lived, but 
that it was an intertribal language of quite 
ancient date, and used at first by the coast 
tribes, whose intercourse was much more fre 
quent than those of the interior. It spread by 
the Columbia River and through waterways, at 
last reaching the Rocky Mountains, and cov 
ered the coast from San Francisco Bay to the 
Arctic. As the trading was done largely at 
Nootka Sound a century ago, that language 
would naturally be largely represented in such 
a jargon, but the fact that the oldest white 
people who have made any records of this 
Oregon region have used tyee as a name for God, 
chuck for water, kloshe for good, etc., and that 
the same things are found in the Nootka and 
other northern tongues, other than the original 
Jargon, seems to me only to prove my position. 
Jewitt encountered these words as long ago as 
1803, which certainly gives me reason for my 
theory that the Chinook is of an earlier date 
than opponents concede. The whole of Jewitt s 
narrative is so palpably that of a simple, old- 
time sailor spinning his yarn, which bears 
internal evidence of its truth, and which agrees 
with established facts and circumstances on 
this northwest coast, that it leaves us no doubt 
as to the existence of most of the things he 
speaks of, though he was not a man of suffi 
cient observation and experience to make the 
best use of his opportunities. When he wrote 
yama for kamass it may have been days or 
months from the time of hearing it, and wrote 
his remembrance, perhaps, of a word which may 
have been pronounced differently when he 
actually heard it. Authors who have edited 
Jewitt s work have taken some liberties with his 
text, and improved, according to their notions, 
upon it. Like that Scotch pastor who, hearing 
Shakespeare s Sermons in stones, books in the 
running brooks, and being convinced that the 



Gill (J. K.) Continued. 

printer had done the poet injustice, said: Ay, 
he meant sermons in books, stones in the run 
ning brooks, so many a simple story is made 
to serve the purpose of pedagogism and quite 
loses its intended character. 

" The Nootka Indians in 1803, when Jewitt 
was among them, were in the habit of using the 
words which I have quoted above among them 
selves. There were no whites in the country 
excepting Jewitt and his companions, and the 
inference is that the Indians used only the lan 
guage which was familiar to them, and not in 
any sense to accommodate their expression to 
Jewitt s comprehension. In speaking with 
strangers of other tribes, however, they would 
probably do what Americans who converse 
with Germans sometimes do, that is, interpolate 
German words (if they know any) in their 
English conversation, with the idea that they 
exhibit their own knowledge, or that they set 
their auditor at ease. As Jewitt was of a dif 
ferent race, the use of the words above may 
have been impressed upon him rather than the 
words which may have been in use for the 
same things in the native tongue of the Nootkas. 
But if the words are Nootka, as you insist, and 
I am willing to admit they may be, there is no 
doubt about their having been transplanted to 
the mouth of the Columbia and having spread 
into the interior of the Pacific Slope a trans 
planting which may have been from either 
source, as you can readily see. And as the earliest 
whites on the Columbia heard the same words 
in use by Indians who spoke languages which 
were Greek to the Indians on Puget Sound and 
Vancouver Island, the fact is all the more cer 
tainly established that many words were com 
mon among a number of tribes who had their 
own native words also for the same things. As 
Jewitt gives but a dozen or less Indian words 
altogether in the edition of his book which I 
have, and at least six of them are congeners of 
the Chinook, I am inclined to think that if he 
had used sixty words of the people among whom 
he lived, he might have shown us the same 
proportion of Chinook words, and it is but fair 
to consider that he would not have chosen only 
words which were of this common Jargon." 

Mr. Gill s comments were forwarded by me 
to Mr. Horatio Hale, the author of the Manual 
of the Oregon trade language or Chinook Jar 
gon" referred to by Mr. Gill, who comments as 
follows : 

"In preparing my account of the Chinook 
Jargon for the enterprising London publishers, 
Messrs. Whittaker & Co., I had not the advan 
tage of being able to refer to Mr. Gill s dic 
tionary, which I have never seen. From his 
account of it, I have no doubt that it would 
have been of material service in my task. His 
care in marking the accented syllables is a 
scholarly precaution which compilers of such 
vocabularies are too apt to neglect. 

" My materials were derived mainly from 
my own collections, made in Oregon in 1841, 



38 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Gill (J. K.) Continued. 

and published in 1846 in my volume of the U. 
S. Exploring Expedition series. These were 
supplemented hy later information obtained 
from the excellent dictionary of George Gibbs 
.and from the letters and publications of Mr. 
Eells and Dr. Boas. I should have preferred to 
retain the scientific orthography (consonants 
as in English, vowels as in Italian) which was 
adopted in my former work ; but as the Jargon 
has now become, through its use by the mis 
sionaries and others, a written language with 
the English orthography, it seemed proper to 
adopt that spelling, merely adding the scien 
tific forms in parentheses as a guide to the pro 
nunciation. 

"The word meaning out, which Mr. Gill 
spells Tclahane (dividing it in his dictionary, I 
presume, to show that it is a trisyllable) is 
written by Mr. Eells in his sermon printed in 
my Jargon volume (p. 32) klaltanie (klahanie 
kopa town, out of town), and by Mr. Gibbs, klah- 
hanie, or klagh-anie, with the accent affixed to 
the last syllable. The Jargon lias several tri 
syllables of this sort, such as saghalie or sah- 
halie, above, keekwilee, below, illahie, earth, 
which are variously written, and are accented 
indifferently on the first or on the last syllable. 

"In Mr. Gill s suggestion that Chinook 
existed as an intertribal language prior to the 
necessity of the use of the trapper and trader, 
he evidently confounds, as many do, the proper 
Chinook language with the Jargon, or artificial 
trade language. The Indians of Oregon terri 
tory were quick in learning languages, and 
some of them could speak five or six native 
idioms. The genuine Chinook, being spoken 
by a tribe holding a central position along the 
Columbia River, and much given to trade, would 
naturally be known to many natives of other 
tribes, and would be frequently spoken in inter 
tribal intercourse, like the Chippewa among 
the eastern Indians and the Malay in the East 
Indian Archipelago. This was doubtless what 
was meant by Mr. Gill s aged native informant 
in referring to the Chinook as the common 
medium of intercourse before the white traders 
visited the country. That he could have 
referred to the Jargon is simply impossible, as 
the internal evidence of its structure suffi 
ciently shows. 

"Both philology and ethnography are much 
indebted to the thoughtful labors of intelligent 
inquirers like Mr. Gill in preserving these inter 
esting relics of vanishing idioms and aboriginal 
customs. I ought, perhaps, to add that though 
the use of the Jargon is dying out, for the rea 
son which Mr. Gill so pithily gives, in the 
country of its origin the Pacific coast region 
south of Puget Sound it is extending in 
British Columbia and Alaska, and seems 
likely to do good service there for many years 
to come." 

Gill s complete dictionary of the Chinook 
Jargon. See Gill (J. K.) 



Gill s dictionary of the Chinook Jargon. 

(1889-1891.) *See Gill (J. K.) 
Good (Rev. John Booth). A vocabulary 
| and | outlines of grammar | of the | 
Nitlakapamuk | or | Thompson tongue, 
| (The Indian language spoken 
between Yale, Lillooet, | Cache Creek 
and Nicola Lake.) | Together with a 
| Phonetic Chinook Dictionary, | 
Adapted for use in the Province of | 
British Columbia. | By J. B. Good, S. 
P. G. missionary, Yale-Lytton. | By aid 
of a Grant from the Right Hon. Superin 
tendent of Indian | Affairs, Ottawa. | 

Victoria : | Printed by the St. Paul s 
Mission Press, (S.P. C. K.) | Collegiate 
School, 1880. 

Co^ver title differing from the above in one 
line of the imprint only ("Victoria, B.C.:"), 
title as above verso blank 1 1. preface pp. 5-6, 
text pp. 8-46, 8. 

Chinook [Jargon] dictionary. English-Chin 
ook, alphabetically arranged, in double col 
umns, containing about 750 words and the 
numerals 1-11, 20, 30, 100, 1000, occupies the even 
numbered pages 8-30, the Thompson vocabu 
lary occurring on the alternate, odd-numbered 
pages. Conversations, English-Chinook, pp. 
32, 34. The Lord s prayer in Jargon, with inter 
linear translation in English, p. 34. 

Copies seen : Bancroft, Dunbar, Eames, 
Mallet, Pilling, Wellesley. 
G-rammar : 

Chinook See Boas (F.) 

Grammatic comments: 

Chinook See Gallatin (A.) 

Chinook Hale (H.) 

Chinook Jargon Crane (A.) 

Chinook Jargon Eells (M.) 

Chinook Jargon Hale (H.) 

Watlala Bancroft (H. H.) 

G-rammatic treatise : 

Chinook See Boas (F.) 

Chinook Miiller (F.) 

Chinook Jargon Bulmer (T. S.) 

Chinook Jargon Demers (M.) et al. 

Chinook Jargon Hale (H.) 

Grasserie (Raoul de la). Etudes | de | 
grammaire compared | Des relations 
grammaticales | couside re es dans leur 
| concept et dans leur expression | ou de 
la | cate"gorie des cas | par | Raoul de 
la Grasserie | docteur en droit | Juge 
au Tribunal de Rennes | Membre de la 
Socie te de Linguistique de Paris. | 

Paris | Jean Maisonneuve, dditeur | 
25, quai Voltaire, | 25 | 1890 

Printed cover as above, half-title verso blank 
1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1. dedication 
verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-344, contents pp. 345- 
351, 8. 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



39 



Grasserie (R.) Continued. 

Examples from several North American lan 
guages are made use of by the author : Nahuatl, 
Dakota, Othomi, Maya, Quiche, Totonaque, 
Iroquois, Athapaske, Chiapaneque, Sahaptin, 
Tcherokess, Algonquin, Tarasque, Esquimau, 
Tchinuk, Choctaw, pp. 17, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 
84, 129-132, 133, 177, 325-326, 394, 395. 

Copies seen : Gatschet. 

Greely : This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy 
of the work referred to has been seen by the 
compiler in the library of Gen. A. W. Greely, 
Washington, D. C. 

Green (J. S.) Extracts from the report 
of an exploring tour on the northwest 
coast of North America in 1829, by Rev. 
J. S. Green. 

In the Missionary Herald, vol. 26, pp. 343-345, 
Boston [1830], 8. (Pilling.) 

"Their language," p. 344, includes four 
phrases in the language, of Queen Charlotte 
Island compared with the same in the Jargon 
of the tribes. 



Guide-Book to the Gold Regions of 
Frazer River. With a map of the dif 
ferent routes, &c. 
New York, 1858. (*) 

55 pp. 24. 

A vocabulary of the Jargon, pp. 45-55. 
Title and note from Gibbs s Dictionary of 
the Chinook Jargon. 

Guide | to the province of | British Co 
lumbia, | for | 1877-8, | Compiled from 
the latest and most authentic sources | 
of information. | 

Victoria: | T. N. Hibben & co., pub 
lishers. | 1877. 

Title verso copyright notice (1877) and name 
of printer 1 1. preface verso blank 1 1. contents 
pp. v-xii, text pp. 1-374, advertisements pp. 
375-410, 8. 

Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon. Indian 
trade language of the Pacific coast. Part I. 
Chinook-English, pp. 232-239. Part II. Eng 
lish-Chinook, pp. 240-249. Each alphabetically 
arranged. 

Copies seen : British Museum, Eames, Pilling. 



H. 



Haines (Elijah Middlebrook). The | 
American Indian | (Uh-nish-in-na-ba). 
| The Whole Subject Complete in One 
Volume | Illustrated with Numerous 
Appropriate Engravings. | By Elijah 
M. Haines. | [Design.] j 

Chicago: j the Mas-sin-na -gan com 
pany, | 1888! 

Title verso copyright notice (1888) etc. 1 1. 
preface pp. vii-viii, contents and list of illus 
trations pp. 9-22, text pp. 23-821, large 8. 

Chapter vi, Indian tribes, pp. 121-171, gives 
special lists and a general alphabetic list of the 
tribes of North America, derivations of tribal 
names being frequently given; among them 
the Chinook, pp. 131-132. Chapter ix. Indian 
languages (pp. 184-212) contains much lin 
guistic material relating to the North Ameri 
can peoples ; amongst it the Chinook Jargon, " 
which includes a general discussion of the lan 
guage, p. 211, and a vocabulary of 90 words, 
alphabetically arranged by English words, pp. 
211-212. Chapterxxxvi. Numerals and the use 
of numbers (pp. 433-451) includes the numer 
als 1-12, 20, 100 (from Schoolcraft), p. 445. 
Chapter Iv. Vocabularies (668-703) includes a 
"Vocabulary comparing pronouns and other 
parts of speech ( J, thou, he, yes, no) in the dia 
lects of various Indian tribes, among them the 
Chinook, p. 676. 

Copies seen : Congress, Eames, Pilling. 

Haldeman (Samuel Stehman). Analytic 
orthography : | an | investigation of the 
sounds of the voice, | and their | alpha 
betic notation ; | including | the mech 
anism of speech, j and its bearing upon 



Haldeman (S. S.) Continued. 

| etymology. | By | S. S. Haldeman, A. 
M., j professor in Delaware college; | 
member [&c. six lines.] | 

Philadelphia : | J. B. Lippincott & co. 
| London : Triibner & co. Paris : Ben 
jamin Duprat. | Berlin: Ferd. Dumni- 
ler. | 1860. 

Half-title (Trevely an prize essay) verso blank 
1 1. title verso blank 1 1. pref ace pp. v-vi, contents 
pp. vii-viii, slip of additional corrections, text 
pp. 5-147, corrections and additions p. 148, 4. 

Numerals 1-10 in a number of American lan 
guages, among them the Chinook, "dictated 
by Dr. J. K. Townsend," p. 146. 

Copies seen : Boston Athenaeum, British Mu 
seum, Bureau of Ethnology, Eames, Trumbull. 

First printed in American Philosoph. Soc. 
Trans, new series, vol. 11. (*) 

Samuel Stehman Haldeman, naturalist, was 
born in Locust Grove, Lancaster County, Pa., 
August 12, 1812; died in Chickies, Pa., Septem 
ber 10, 1880. He was educated at a classical 
school in Harrisburg and then spent two years 
in Dickinson College. In 1836 Henry D. 
Rogers, having been appointed State geologist 
of New Jersey, sent for Mr. Haldeman, who 
had been his pupil at Dickinson, to assist him. 
A year later, on the reorganization of the 
Pennsylvania geological survey, Haldeman 
was transferred to his own State, and was 
actively engaged on the survey until 1842. He 
made extensive researches among Indian dia 
lects and also in Pennsylvania Dutch, besidesin- 
vestigations in the English, Chinese, and other 
languages. Appleton a Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 



40 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Hale (Horatio). United States | explor 
ing expedition. | During the years | 
1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842. | Under the 
command of | Charles Wilkes, U. S. N. 
| Vol. VI. | Ethnography and philol 
ogy- I B y I Horatio Hale, | philologist 
of the expedition. | 

Philadelphia: | printed by C. Sher 
man. | 1846. 

Half-title (United States exploring expedi 
tion, by authority of Congress) verso blank 1 1. 
title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-vii, alphabet 
pp. ix-xii, half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3- 
666, map, 4. 

Languages of northwestern America (pp. 
553-650) contains general remarks and exam 
ples of the languages of the peoples of that 
region, including the Tshinuk family, pp. 562- 
564. Remarks on the vocabularies, pp. 567- 
568. Vocabulary (600 words) of the Tshinuk 
(Watlala or Cascade Indians, Nihaloitih or 
Echeloots, Tshiuuk, Tlatsop or Clatsops, 
Wakaikam or TVahkyecums), pp. 570-629. The 
"Jargon "or trade language of Oregon (pp. 
635-650) contains remarks on its origin, pp. 635- 
636. Lists of 17 words derived from the 
Nootka, 41 words from the English, 100 words 
from the Tshinuk, 33 words from the French, 
12 words by onomatopoeia, and 38 doubtful, pp. 
636-639. Remarks on the phonology, grammar, 
etc. (including the numerals 1-10, 100, and the 
pronouns), pp. 640-644. Short sentences with 
English equivalents, pp. 644-646. Vocabulary 
(English-Chinook, about 325 words), pp. 646-650. 

For a reprint of much of this material see 
Gallatin (A.) 

Copies seen : Astor, British Museum, Con- j 
gress, Lenox, Trumbull. 

At the Squier sale. no. 446, a copy brought j 
$13; at the Murphy sale, no. 1123, half maroon i 
morocco, top edge gilt, $13. 

Issued also with the following title : 

United States | exploring expedi 
tion. | During the years | 1838, 1839, : 
1840, 1841, 1842. | Under the command ; 
of | Charles Wilkes, U. S. N. | Ethnog- | 
raphy and philology. | By | Horatio | 
Hale, | philologist of the expedition. | 

Philadelphia: | Lea and Blanchard. 
| 1846. 

Half-title (United States exploring expedi- | 
tiou) verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. con- | 
tents pp. v-vii, alphabet pp. ix-xii, half-title 
verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-666, map, 4. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 

Copies seen : Eames, Lenox. 

Was America peopled from Poly 
nesia? 

In Congres Int. des Americanistes, Compte- 
rendu, 7th session, pp. 375-387, Berlin, 1890, 8. 
(Eames, Pilling.) 



Hale (H.) Continued. 

Table of the pronouns 7, thou,we (inc.), we 
(exc.) , ye, and they in the languages of Polynesia 
and of western America, pp. 386-387, includes 
the Tshinuk, p. 386, line 21. 

Issued separately with title-page as follows : 

Was America peopled from Polyne 
sia? | A study in comparative Philol 
ogy- I % I Horatio Hale. | From the 
Proceedings of the International Con 
gress of Americanists | at Berlin, in 
October 1888. | 

Berlin 1890. | Printed by H. S. Her 
mann. 

Title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-15, 8. 
Pronouns in the languages of Polynesia and 
of western America, including the Tshinuk, p. 

14. 

Copies seen : Pilling, Wellesley. 

An international idiom. | A manual 
of the | Oregon trade language, | or | 
" Chinook Jargon/ | By Horatio Hale, 
M.A., F. R. S.C., | member [&c. six 
lines.] | 

London: | Whittaker & co., White 
Hart Street, | Paternoster square. | 
1890. 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso names 
of printers 1 1. prefatory note verso extract 
from a work by Quatrefages 1 1. contents verso 
blank 1 1. text pp. 1-63, 16. 

The Oregon trade language, pp. 1-3. Its 
origin and composition, pp. 3-9. Orthography 
andpronunciation (pp. 9-12) includes three short 
comparative vocabularies Chinook, Chinook 
Jargon, and meaning; English, Jargon, and 
meaning; French, Jargon, and meaning, pp. 9- 
11. Grammar, including numerals and a list 
of pronouns, pp. 12-19. T he past and future of 
the Jargon, pp. 19-21. The language as spoken 
(pp. 22-38) includes a list of sentences and 
phrases, pp. 22-23 ; songs (from Swan and Boas) 
with English translations, pp. 24-25; hymns 
( from Eells), with English translation, pp. 26-27; 
sermon (from Eells s manuscript), in English, 
pp. 28-31; the same in Jargon, with interlinear 
English translation, pp. 32-37; the Lord s 
prayer (from Eells) in Jargon, with interlinear 
translation into English, pp. 37-38. Trade lan 
guage, alphabetically arranged, in double col 
umns, by Jargon words, pp. 39-52. English 
and trade Ian guage, alphabetically arranged, in 
double columns, by English words, pp. 53-63. 

"This dictionary, it should be stated, is, in 
the main, a copy (with some additions and cor 
rections) of that of George Gibbs [q.v.], pub 
lished by the Smithsonian Institution in 1863, 
and now regarded as the standard authority, so 
far as any can be said to exist; but it maybe 
added that the principal part of that collection 
was avowedly derived by the estimable com- 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



41 



Hale (H.) Continued. 

piler from ray own vocabulary, published seven 
teen years before." 

Copies seen : Eames, Pilling. 

For critical reviews of this work, see Oha- 
rencey (H. de), Crane (A.), Leland (C. G-.), 
Reade (J.), and Western. 

Horatio Hale, ethnologist, born in Newport, 
N. H., May 3, 1817, was graduated at Harvard in 
1837 and was appointed in the same year philolo 
gist to the United States exploring expedition 
under Capt. Charles Wilkes. In this capacity 
he studied a large number of the languages of 
the Pacific islands, as well as of North and 
South America, Australia, and Africa, and also 
investigated the history, traditions, and cus 
toms of the tribes speaking those languages. 
The results of his inquiries are given in his 
Ethnography and Philology (Philadelphia, 
1846), which forms the seventh volume of the 
expedition reports. He has published numerous 
memoirs on anthropology and ethnology, is a 
member of many learned societies, both in 
Europe and in America, and in 1886 was vice- 
president of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, presiding over the 
section of anthropology. Appleton s Cyclop, of 
Am. Biog. 

Harvard : This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy 
of the work referred to has been seen by the 
compiler in the library of Harvard University, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

[Hayden (Ferdinand Vandever)], in 
charge. Department of the interior. \ 
Bulletin J of \ the United States \ Geo 
logical and geographical survey \ of \ 
the territories. \ No. l[-Vol. VI]. \ 

Washington : \ Government printing 
office, j 1874[-1881]. 

6vols.8. 

Eells (M.), The Twana Indians, vol. 3, pp. 57- 
114. 

Copies seen : Geological Survey. 

Hazlitt (William Carew). British 
Columbia, | and | Vancouver island; | 
comprising | a historical sketch of the 
British settlements | in the north-west 
coast of America; | And a Survey of 
the | physical character, capabilities, 
climate, topography, | natural history, 
geology and ethnology | of that region ; 
j Compiled from Official and other 



Hazlitt (W. C.) Continued. 
Authentic Sources. | By | William 
Carew Hazlitt, | author of [&c. two 
lines.] | With a map. | 

London: | G. Routledge & co., Far- 
ringdon street. | New York : | 18 Beek- 
man street. | 1858. | (The author 
reserves the right of Translation.) 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso names 
of printers 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. 
vii-viii, text pp. 1-240, appendix pp. 241-247, 
colophon p. 248, 16. 

Vocabulary of the Chinook Jargon (365 
words and phrases, and the numerals 1-12, 100, 
1000) from the San Francisco Bulletin, June 4 
[1858], pp. 241-243. See Chinook. 

Copies seen : Bancroft, British Museum, Con 
gress, Harvard. 

- The | great gold fields of | Cariboo ; 
| with an authentic description, 
brought down | to the latest period, | 
of | British Columbia | and j Vancouver 
island. | By William Carew Hazlitt, | 
of the Inner temple, barrister-at-law. | 
With an accurate map. | 

London: | Routledge, Warne, and 
Routledge, | Farringdon street. | New 
York : 56, Walker street. | 1802. 

Title verso names of printers 1 1. preface pp. 
iii-v, contents pp. vii-viii, text pp. 1-165, appen 
dices pp. 166-184. 16. 

Vocabulary of the Chinook Jargon as noted 
under title next above, pp. 179-180. 

Copies seen: Astor, Bancroft. Boston Athe 
naeum. 

This author s Cariboo, the newly discovered 
gold fields of British Columbia, London, 1862, 
does not contain the vocabulary. 
Hymn-book : 

Chinook Jargon See Eells (M.) 

Chinook Jargon Le Jeune (J. M. E.) 

Hymns : 
Cascade 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargoit 
Chinook Jargon 



See Lee (D.) and Frost (J. H.) 
Blanchet (F. N.) 
Tate(C.M.) 
Bulmer (T. S.) 
Demers (M.) et al. 
Everette (W. E.) 
Eells (M.) 
Hale (H.) 
Macleod (X. D.) 
St. Ouge (L. N.) 



42 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



J. 



Jacques Cartier School : These words following a 
title or inclosed within parentheses after a note 
indicate that a copy of the work referred to 
has been seen by the compiler in the library of 
that institution, Montreal. 

Jehan (Louis-Francois). Troisieme et 
derniere | Encyclopedic th^ologique, | 
[&c. twenty-four lines] | publie"e | par 
M. I abbe Migne | [&c. six lines.] | 
Tome trente-quatrieme. | Dictionnaire 
de linguistique. | Tome unique. | Prix : 
7 francs. | 

S Iniprime et se vend chez J.-P. Migne, 
e"diteur, | aux ateliers catholiques, rue 
d Amboise, an Petit-Montrouge, | Bar- 
riere d enfer de Paris. | 1858. 

Second title : Dictionnaire | de | linguistique 
| et | de philologie comparee. | Histoire de 
toutes les langues mortes et vivantes, | ou | 
traite completd idiomographie, | embrassant | 
1 examen critique des systemes et de toutes les 
questions qui se rattachent | & 1 origine et a la 
filiation des langues, a leur essence organique 
| et a leurs rapports avec 1 histoire des races 
humaines, de leurs migrations, etc. | Precede 
d un | Essai sur le role du langage dans 1 6 vo 
lution de 1 intelligence humaine. | Par L.-F. 
Jehan (de Saint-Clavien), | Membre de la Soci- 
6t6 g6ologique de France, de 1 Academie royale 
des sciences de Turin, etc. | [Quotation, three 
lines.] | Publie | par M.T Abbe Migne, 1 editeur 
de la Bibliotheque universelle du elergS, | ou | 
des cours complets sur chaque branche de la 
science eeclesiastique. | Tome unique. | Prix : 
7 francs. | 

S Imprime et se vend chez J.-P. Migne, 6di- 
teur, | aux ateliers catholiques, rue d Amboise, 
au Petit-Montrouge, | Barriere d enfer de 
Paris. | 1858. 

Outside title 1 1. titles as above 2 11. columns 
(two to a page) 9-1448, large 8. 

See under title next below for linguistic con 
tents. 

Copies seen : British Museum. 

Troisieme et derniere | Encyclopedic 

| the"ologique, | ou troisieme et der 
niere | aerie de dictionnaires sur toutes 
les parties de la science religieuse, | 
offrant en francais, et par ordre alplia- 
be"tique, | la plus claire, la plus facile, 
la plus commode, la plus varide | et la 
plus complete des theologies: | [&c. 



Jehan (L.F.) Continued, 
seventeen lines] publiee | parM.l abb^ 
Migne, | [&c. six lines.] | Tome trente- 
quatrieme. | Dictionnaire de linguis 
tique. | Tome unique. Prix: 8 francs. | 
S imprimeet se vend chez J.-P. Migne, 
^diteur, | aux ateliers catholiques, rue 
d Amboise, 20, au Petit-Montrouge, | 
autrefois Barriere d enfer de Paris, 
maintenant dans Paris. | 1864 

Second title : Dictionnaire | de | linguistiq/ue 
| et | de philologie comparee. | Histoire de 
toutes | les langues mortes et vivantes, | ou | 
traite completd idiomographie, | embrassant | 
1 examen critique des systemes et de toutes les 
questions qui se rattachent | a 1 origine et a la 
filiation des langues, a leur essence organique 
| et a leurs rapports avec 1 histoire des races 
humaines, de leurs migrations, etc. | Precede 
d un | Essai sur le role du langage dans l 6vo- 
Intion de 1 intelligence humaine. | Par L.-F. 
Jehan (de Saint-Clavien), | Membre de la Soci- 
ete gt ologique de France, del Academie royale 
des sciences de Turin, etc. | [Quotation, three 
lines.] | Publie | par M. 1 abbe Migne, editeur 
de la Bibliotheque universelle du clerge, | ou I 
des cours complets sur chaque branche de la 
science ecclesiastique. | Tome unique. | Prix: 
7 francs. | 

S imprime et se vend chez J.-P. Migne, edi 
teur, | aux ateliers catholiques, rue d Amboise, 
20, au Petit-Montrouge, | autrefois Barriere 
d enfer de Paris, maintenant dans Paris. | 1864 

First title Yerso"avis important" 1 1. second 
title verso printer 1 1. introduction numbered 
by columns 9-208, text in double columns 209- 
1250, notes additionnelles columns 1249-1432, 
table des matieres columns 1433-1448, large 8. 

The article "Colombienne," columns 435-436, 
contains a brief enumeration only of the tribes 
speaking languages of five different families, 
of which two are Chinook, viz : 

2 Colombienne inferieure, including the dia 
lects of the Echeloots, the Skilloots, the Wah- 
kiacum, the Cathlamahs, the Chinuooks, the 
Clatsops, and the Chilts. 

3 (Multnomah, including the dialects of the 
Multnomah, the Cathlacumup, the Cathlanah- 
quiah, the Cathlacomatup, the Clannahmina- 
mum, the Clahnaquah, the Quathlapottes, the 
Shotos, the Cathlahaws, and the Clackumos. 

Copies seen : Eames. 

Johnson (Frank). See Gatschet (A. S.) 
Jiilg (B.) See Vater (J. S.) 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



43 



K. 



Keane (Augustus H.) Ethnography 
and philology of America. By A. H. 
Keane. 

In Bates (H. W.), Central America, the West 
Indies, etc. pp. 443-561, London, 1878, 8. 

General scheme of American races and lan 
guages (pp. 460-497) includes a list of the 
branches of the Chinookaii family, divided into 
languages and dialects, p. 474. Alphabetical 
list of all known American tribes and lan 
guages, pp. 498-561. 

Reprinted in the 1882 and 1885 editions of the 
same work and on the same pages. 



Keane (A. H.) Continued. 

American Indians. 

In Encyclopaedia Britannica, ninth edition, 
vol. 12, pp. 822-830, New York, 1881, royal 8. 

Columbia Races, p. 826, includes thedivisions 
of the Chinookan. 

Knipe (Rev. C.) [Comparative vocabu 
lary of the Chinook and Tahkaht.] 

Manuscript, 3 leaves, folio, written on one 
side only; in the library of the Bureau of Eth 
nology. Included in an article by Mr. Knipe, 
entitled: Notes on the Indian tribes of the 
northwest coast of America. 



L. 



Langevin (H. L.) British Columbia.) 
Report of the hon. H. L. Langevin, C. 
B., | minister of public works. | Printed 
by order of parliament. | [Vignette.] | 

Ottawa: | printed by I. B. Taylor, 29, 
31 and 33, Rideau street. | 1872. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso 
blank 1 1. contents pp. iii-iv, [list of] appen 
dices pp. v-vi. text pp. 1-55, appendices pp. 56- 
246, 8. 

Appendix CC. A dictionary of the Chinook 
Jargon, or Indian trade language of the north 
Pacific coast. Published by T. TS. Hibben and 
Co., Victoria, B.C. Part I. Chinook-English, 
pp. 161-173. Part II. English-Chinook, pp. 174- 
182. 

Copies seen : Georgetown. 

Latham (Robert Gordon). Miscellaneous 
contributions to the ethnography of 
North America. By R. G. Latham, M.D. 

In Philological Soc. [of London], Proc. vol. 2, 
pp. 31-50 [London], 1846, 8. (Congress.) 

Contains a number of Cathlascon terms in 
the comparative lists of words. 

Reprinted in the same author s Opuscula, pp. 
275-297, for title of which see below. 

On the languages of the Oregon ter 
ritory. By R. G. Latham, M. D. Read 
before the Society on the llth Decem 
ber, 1844. 

In Ethnological Soc. of London, Jour. vol. 1, 
pp. 154-166, Edinburgh [1848], 8. (Congress.) 

A vocabulary of the Shoshonee, showing 
"affinities (such as they are)" with a number 
of American languages, among them the 
Chinook and Cathlascon, pp. 159-160. 

This article reprinted in the same author s 
Opuscula, pp. 249-264, for title of which see 
below. 

The | natural history | of | the varie 
ties of man. | By | Robert Gordon 



Latham (R. G.) Continued. 

Latham, M. D., F. R. S., | late fellow of 
King s college, Cambridge; | one of the 
vice-presidents of the Ethnological soci 
ety, London; | corresponding member 
to the Ethnological society, | New 
York, etc. | [Monogram in shield.] | 

London: | John Van Voorst, Pater 
noster row. | M. D. CCCL [1850]. 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso names 
of printers 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. 
preface pp. vii-xi, bibliography pp. xiii-xv, 
explanation of plates verso blank 1 1. contents 
pp. xix-xxviii, text pp. 1-566, index pp. 567-574, 
list of works by Dr. Latham verso blank 1 1. 8. 

Division F. American Mongolidre (pp. 287- 
460) includes a classification of a number of 
North American families, among them the 
Chinucks, pp. 316-323. Tbis includes a general 
discussion, pp. 316-321 ; Jargon words of Eng 
lish origin (26), of French origin" (22), and 
derived by onomatoposia (8), pp. 321-322. 

Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Con 
gress, Eames. 

On the languages of Northern, West 
ern, and Central America. By R. G. 
Latham, M. D. (Read May the 9th.) 

In Philological Soc. [of London], Trans. 1856, 
pp. 57-115, London [1857], 8. (Congress.) 

Brief references to the Chinook and its rela 
tion to other northwest languages. 

This article reprinted in the same author s 
Opuscula, pp. 326-377, for title of which see 
below. 

Opuscula. | Essays | chiefly | philo 
logical and ethnographical | by | Rob 
ert Gordon Latham, | M. A., M. D., P. 
R. S., etc. | late fellow of Kings college, 
Cambridge, late professor of English | 
in University college, London, late 



44 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Latham (R. G.) Continued. 

assistant physician | at the Middlesex 
hospital. | 

Williams & Norgate, | 14 Henrietta 
street, Covent garden, London | and | 
20 South Frederick street, Edinburgh. 
| Leipzig, R. Hartmann. | 1860. 

Title verso name of printer 1 1. preface pp. 
iii-iv, contents pp. v-vi, text pp. 1-377, addenda 
and corrigenda pp. 378-418, 8. 

A reprint of a number of papers read before 
the ethnological and philological societies of 
London, among them the following, which 
include Chinookan material: 

On the languages of Oregon territory (pp. 
249-264) contains a comparative vocabulary of 
the Shoshonie with other languages, among 
them the Chinook and Cathlascon, pp. 255-256. 

Miscellaneous contributions to the ethnog 
raphy of North America (pp. 275-297) contains 
a number of Cathlascon words in the compara 
tive lists. 

On the languages of northern, western, and 
central America (pp. 326-377) contains brief 
references to the Chinook and its relation to 
other languages. 

Addenda and corrigenda, 1859 (pp. 378-418) 
contains brief comments on the Chinook, p. 388 ; 
Chinook words, p. 389: short vocabulary (12 
words) of the Chinook compared witli Selish 
and Shoshonie, pp. 415-416. 

Copies seen : Astor, Boston Public, Brinton, 
Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, Eames, Pilling. 
"Watkinson . 

At the Squier sale a presentation copy, no. 
639, brought $2.37. The Murphy copy, no. 1438, 
sold for $1. 

Elements | of | comparative philol 
ogy. | By | R. G. Latham, M. A., M. D., 
F. R. S., fec., | late fellow of Kings Col 
lege, Cambridge ; and late professor of 
English | in University college, Lon 
don. | 

London : Wai ton and Maberly, Upper 
Gower street, and Ivy lane, Paternoster 
row; | Longman, Green, Longman, 
Roberts, and Green, | Paternoster row. 
| 1862. | The Right of Translation is 
Reserved. 

Half-title verso names of printers 1 1. title 
verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. 
preface pp. vii-xi, contents pp. xiii-xx, tabular 
view pp. xxi-xxxii, errata p. [xxxiii], text pp. 
1-752, addenda pp. 753-757, index pp. 758-774, 8. 

Vocabulary of 48 words, and the numerals 
1-10 in the Watlala language, pp. 402-403. 

Copies seen : Astor, British Museum, Bureau 
of Ethnology, Eames, Watkinson. 

Dufosse, 1887 catalogue, no. 24564, priced a 
copy 20 fr., and Hiersemann, no. 36 of cata 
logue 16, 10 M. 



Latham (R. G.) Continued. 

Robert Gordon Latham, the eldest son of the 
Rev. Thomas Latham, was born in the vicarage 
of Billingsborough, Lincolnshire, March 24, 
1812. In 1819 he was entered at Eton. Two years 
afterwards he was admitted on the foundation, 
and in 1829 went to Kings, where he took his 
fellowship and degrees. Ethnology was his 
first passion and his last, though for botany 
he had a very strong taste. He died March 9, 
1888. Theodore Watts in The Athenceum, March 
17, 1888. 

Leclerc (Charles). Bibliotheca | ameri- 
cana | Catalogue raisonne | d uno tres- 
precieuse | collection de livres anciens 
| et modernes | sur 1 Ame rique et lea 
Philippines | Classes par ordre alpha- 
be"tique de noms d Auteurs. | Re dige 
par Ch. Leclerc. | [Design.] | 

Paris | Maisonneuve & C ic | 15, qua! 
Voltaire | M. D. CCC. LXVII [1867] 

Cover title as above, half-title verso details of 
sale 1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1. preface 
pp. v-vii, catalogue pp. 1-407, 8. 

Includes titles of a number of works contain 
ing material relating to the Chinookan lan 
guages. 

Copies seen : Congress, Eames, Pilling. 

At the Fischer sale, a copy, no. 919, brought 
10s. ; at the Squier sale, no. 651, $1.50. Leclerc, 
1878, no. 345, prices it 4 fr. and Maisonneuve, in 
1889, 4 fr. The Murphy copy, no. 1452, brought 
$2.75. 

Bibliotheca | americana | Histoire, 

ge"ographie, | voyages, arche"ologie et 
linguistique | des | deux Ame"riques | 
et | des iles Philippines | re dige e | Par 
Ch. Leclerc | [Design] | 

Paris | Maisonneuve et C ifi , libraires- 
e"diteurs | 25, quai Voltaire, 25. | 1878 

Cover title as above, half-title verso blank 
1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1. avant-propos 
pp. i-xvii, table des divisions pp. xviii-xx, cat 
alogue pp. 1-643, supplement pp. 645-694, index 
pp. 695-737, colophon verso blank 1 1. 8. 

The linguistic part of this volume occupies 
pp. 537-643 ; it is arranged under families, and 
contains titles of books in many American lan 
guages, among them the following : 

Langues americaines en general, pp. 537-550; 
Chinook, p. 565. 

Copies seen : Boston Athena?um, Eames, Pil 
ling. 

Priced by Quaritch, no. 12172, 12s. ; another 
copy, no. 12173, large paper, 11. Is. Leclerc s 
Supplement, 1881, no. 2831. prices it 15 fr., andno. 
2832, a copy on Holland paper, 30 fr. A large 
paper copy is priced by Quaritch, no. 30230, 12*. 
Maisonneuve in 1889 prices it 15 fr. 

Lee (Daniel) and Frost (J. H.) Ten 
years in Oregon. | By D. Lee and J. H. 
Frost, | late of the Oregon mission of 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



45 



Lee (D.) and Frost (J. H.) Cont d. 
the Methodist episcopal church. | 
[Picture.] | 

New- York: | published for the 
authors: 200 Mulberry-street. | J. 
Collord, Printer. | 1844. 

Title verso copyright notice 1 1. preface pp. 
3-6, contents pp. 7-11, text pp. 13-344, 12. 

Specimen of an Indian [Cathlascon] prayer 
with English translation, pp. 184-185. A num 
ber of sentences and grace hefore meals in the , 
language of the Indians of the Cascades, p. 204. j 
Hymn (two verses) in the Cascade with | 
English translation, p. 205. Vocabulary (50 | 
words) of the Clatsop [Chinook Jargon], south 
side of the Columbia Kiver, pp. 343-344. 

Copies seen r Astor, Boston Athenaeum, Brit- \ 
ish Museum, Congress, Pilling, Trumbull. 

A few sentences in Chinook Jargon from this i 
work are reprinted in Allen (J.), Ten Tears in 
Oregon. 
Legends: 

Chinook See Boas (F.) 

Chinook Jargon St. Onge (L. N.) 

[Le Jeune (Pere Jean-Marie Raphael).] 
Practical | Chinook [Jargon] vocabu 
lary | comprising | all & the only usual 
words of that wonderful | Language 
arranged in a most | advantageous ; 
order for the speedily learning of | the 
same, after the plan of | right rev. j 
bishop Durieu O MI. | the most experi- I 
enced Missionary & Chinook | speaker j 
in British Columbia. | 

St. Louis mission | Kamloops. | 1886. 

Cover title verso directions for pronouncia- 
tion, no inside title; text pp. 1-16, 16. 

The vocabulary, which is Chinook Jargon, is 
arranged by lessons, i-xviii, without headings. 
They comprise : i, numerals ; ii, the firmament, 
seasons, and days of the week ; iii, geographic 
features, &c. ; iv, the family and relationships; 
v, animals; vi, implements and utensils; vii, 
nationalities; viii, nouns; ix, money; x, parts 
of the body; xi, wearing apparel; xii, domestic 
utensils; xiii, nouns; xiv, adjectives ; xv, pro 
nouns ; xvi, adverbs ; xvii, verbs ; xviii, scripture 
names and church terms. 

Copies seen : Eells, Pilling. 

A later edition with title-page as follows : 

Chinook [Jargon] Vocabulary. | 

Chinook-English, j From the Original 
of Rt. Rev. | Bishop Durieu, O. M. I. | 
With the Chinook Words in Phonog 
raphy | By | J. M. R. Le Jeune O. M. I. 
| Second Edition. | 

Mimeographed at Kamloops. I Octo 
ber 1892. 

Cover title verso Duployan Phonetic Alpha 
bet," no inside title, text (triple columns, 
Chinook Jargon in italics alphabetically 



Le Jeune (J. M. R.) Continued. 

arranged, Jargon in stenographic characters, 
and English in italics) pp. 1-16, prayer in Jar 
gon, stenographic characters, on recto of back 
cover, verso list of publications by Father 
Le Jeune. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 

Early in October, 1892, I wrote to Bishop 
Durieu requesting a copy of the 1886 edition of 
the "Chinook Vocabulary," composed by him, 
and received in reply (November 1) a state 
ment to the effect that he would be glad to 
oblige me, but that he had written no such 
book. Transcribing the title-page of the little 
book in question, I sent it to him asking an 
explanation, as his name was given thereon. 
The following is his response: 

NEW WESTMINISTER, B. C., 

Nov. 16, 1892. 

DEAR SIR: In answer to your favor of the 
llth lust., I beg to state that what I wrote you 
in my last is but the truth. I have not writteu 
anything in the Indian language or in the 
Chinook. What you have enumerated under 
my name, because my name is mentioned on the 
title of the work, must be placed under the 
name of liev. Father Le Jeune as the publisher 
and the author. But to make sure of it, and 
in order that your bibliography may be correct, 
I will sei.d this letter to Rev. Father Le Jqune, 
of Kamloops, begging him to give you the 
name of the author of those works you have 
placed under my name. 
I have the honor to be. dear sir, 
Your humble servant, 

PAUL DURIEU. 

This was sent me with the following explan 
atory letter by Father Le Jeune : 

KAMLOOPS, B. C., Nov. 21, 1893. 

DEAR SIR: Bishop Durieu gave me those les 
sons in Chinook, in a few flying sheets, over 
twelve years ago (September, 1879). Of course 
those sheets are lost long ago. As his lordship 
does not want to appear as the author of those 
little pamphlets, you had better mention them 
as arranged by myself out of lessons received 
from his lordship. 

Yours, 

FATHER LE JEUNE. 

[ ] [Two lines stenographic charac 
ters.] | No. 1. Kamloops Wawa May 2. 
> 91 [_67. 26 Feb. 93] 

A periodical in the Chinook Jargon, steno 
graphic characters, intended as a weekly, but 
issued in its early stages at irregular intervals, 
at Kamloops, British Columbia, under the edi 
torship of Father Le Jeune, and reproduced by 
him with the aid of the mimeograph. See fac 
simile of the first page of the initial issue. 

The first three numbers are in triple col- 
umns, Jargon in italics, Jargon in shorthand 
characters, and English in italics; the fourth 
number is in double columns, Jargon in short 
hand and English in italics; the subsequent 
issues are in shorthand with headings in Eng? 



46 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Le Jeune (J. M. R.) Continued. 

lish. All the issues are in 16 except nos. 5-G 
and 7-8 (double numbers), which are in 32. At 
the beginning each issue consisted of 8 pages, 
with continuous pagination, but occasionally 
the parts were separately paged. Beginning 
with no. 33, the first issue of vol. 2, all the num 
bers consist of 4 pages each. 

The following is a detailed list of the issues, 
made up from my copy, which is the only one 
I have seen, giving number, date of issue, and 
pagination : 
No. 1 May 2, 91, pp. 1-8, 16. 



2 


9, 91, 


1-16, 16o. 


3 


16, 91, 


17-24, 16. 


4 


Aug. 5, 91, 


25-32, 16o. 


5-6 


Sept. 91, 


1-32, 32a. 


[7-8 


Oct. 91, 


1-32], 32o a . 


9 


Feb. 1, 92, 


1-4, 16a. 


10 


6, 92, 


5-8, 16o. 


11 


14, 92, 


9-12, 16. 


12 


21, 92, 


13-16,160. 


13 


28, 92, 


17-20, 16o. 


14 


Mch. 6, 92, 


21-24, 16. 


15 


13, 92, 


[25-29], 17-206, 16. 


16 


20, 92, 


33-34, 21-246, 39-40, 16. 


17 


27, 92, 


41-48, 160. 


18 


Apr. 3, 92, 


49-52, l-4c, 16o. 


19 


10, 92, 


25-286 (57-60 lacking), 






16. 


20 


10, 92, 


65-66, 29-326, 71-72, 16. 


21 


17-24, 92, 


73-74, 33-366, 79-80, 16. 


22 


24, 92, 


81-82 (83-86 lacking), 87- 






88, 160. 


23 


May 1, 92, 


89-90, 37-406, 95-96, 16. 


24 


8, 92, 


105-112 (97-104 lacking), 






160. 


25 


15, 92, 


113-114, 41-446, 119-120, 






16o. 


26 


22, 92, 


121-122, 123-1266, 127-128, 






45-486, 16o. 


27 


26, 92, 


129-130, 131-1346, 135-136, 






160. 


28 


June 5, 92, 


137-138, 139-1426, 139-142, 






bis b, 143-144, 16. 


29 


12, 92, 


145-146, 147-1506, 151-152, 






160. 


30 


19, 92, 


155-158 [Hie] 6, 16o. 


31 


26, 92, 


153-154, 159-160, 163-1666, 






160. 


32 


30, 92, 


(167-168 lacking) 169- 






1726, 160. 


Tol.2 






33 


July 3, 92, 


1-4, 16o. 


34 


10, 92, 


5-8, 16o. 


35 


17, 92, 


9-12, 16o. 


36 


24, 92, 


13-16,160. 


37 


31, 92, 


17-20, 16. 


38 


Aug. 7, 92, 


21-24, 16. 



Supplement to uos. 33-38, pp. l-24rf, 

39 Aug.14, 92, pp. 25-28, 160. 

40 21, 92, 29-32, 16o. 



Le Jeune (J. M. R.) Continued. 

No. 41 Aug.28, 92,pp.33-36, 16o. 

42 Sept. 4, 92, 37-40, 16o. 

43 11, 92. 41-44, 16. 

44 18, 92, 45-48, 16o. 

45 25, 92, 49-52, 16o. 

46 Oct. 2, 92, 53-56,16. 

47 16 (sic) 57-60,160. 

48 16, 92, 61-64, 16o. 

49 23, 92, 65-68, 16. 

50 30, 92, 69-72, 16o. 

51 Nov. 6, 92, 73-76,160. 

52 13, 92, 77-80, 16. 

53 20, 92, 81-84, 16o. 

54 27, 92, 85-88, 16. 

55 Dec. 4, 92, 89-92, 16 C . 

56 11, 92, 93-96, 16o. 

57 18, 92, 97-100, 16. 

58 25, 92, 101-104, 160. 
Vol. 3 : 

59 Jan. 1, 93, 1-4,16. 

60 8, 93, 5-8, 16. 

61 15, 93, 9-12, 12. 

62 22, 93, 13-16, 160. 

63 29, 93, 17-20, 16. 

64 Eeb. 5, 93, 21-24,16. 

65 12, 93, 25-28, 16. 

66 19, 93, 29-32, 16. 

67 26, 93, 33-36,16. 

The breaks in the pagination, beginning in 
no. 15, are due to the intention of the editor to 
make separates of different series of articles, 
one of which, entitled Sacred History, runs 
through many of the issues, beginning with no. 
9, each with its special heading, " The creation 
of the world," "Adam and Eve," etc. In all 
the later numbers of vol. 1, beginning with no. 
15, the middle sheet (4 pages) has its own head 
ing, name of the paper, date, etc., as on the first 
sheet. The Sacred History series runs as fol 
lows, page 17 in no. 15 connecting, it will bo 
seen from the table below, with the sixteen 
pages, variously numbered, appearing in the 
earlier numbers : 
No. 9, pp. 2-4 No. 22, lacking . 

10, 6-8 23, pp. 37-40 

11, 10-12 24, none 

12, 16 25, 41-44 

13, 18-20 26, 123-126 

14, 22-24 27, 131-134 

15, 17-20 28, 139-142 

16, 21-24 28, 139-142 bis 

17, none 29, 147-150 

18, none 30, 155-158 

19, 25-28 31, 163-166 

20, 29-32 32, 169-172 

21, 33-36 

Keferring to this list it will be seen that in 
no. 26 the author added four extra pages (45-48), 
after which the separate pagination was discon 
tinued. In no. 28 also four extra pages (139- 
142 bit) are included. 



a Nos. 5-6 are entitled Chinook Hymns; nos. 7-8, Elements of shorthand; for titles see below. 

6 Sacred history pages. 

cNight prayers in the Shushwap language, 

dHistory of the old testament; for title see St. Onge (L. N.) 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



47 







FACSIMILE OF THE FIRST PAGE OF THE KAMLOOPS WAWA. 



48 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Le Jeune (J. M. R.) Continued. 

In a few numbers the article on Sacred His 
tory is omitted. Of these no. 17 contains in lieu 
four pages of hymns set to music ; no. 18, night 
prayer in Shushwap; in no. 22 nothing was 
substituted; no. 24, list of subscribers, etc. 

In explanation of these irregularities Father 
Le Jeune, under date of July 13, 1892, writes 
me as follows: 

"Concerning your remarks on missing pages 
and numbers, let me say: There are only 4 
pages of no. 19, pp. 25-28 ; it was a mistake ; no. 
18 is Ap. 3 and no. 20, which should have been 
no. 19, is Ap. 10. It was too late to correct the 
error, so I continued counting from no. 20 
upward. In the same way you will find no. 21, 
Sacred History, 64-70, pages 33-36, is the 
same date as no. 22, Ap. 24. The list of sub 
scribers can go in no. 24 as pages 97-100, and 
my French letter of Ap. 1st as pages 101-104. 

"I am ashamed that there should be so 
much confusion in the pagination of the little 
paper; as you see, I was trying to carry out 
two things at the same time first to make the 
regular pages with the calendar of the week 
and second the four pages of Sacred History. 
These were not issued at the same time, but in 
two series, as I wished to have the Sacred His 
tory bound separately. Then I am not sitting 
at rest in an office, but traveling throughout 
my mission, over 500 miles, taking my dupli 
cating outfit with me, with much besides to 
do, as, for instance, 300 confessions to hear at 
Kamloops at Easter, 400 last month at the 
Shushwap, etc. 

"You will see that with July I began the 
second volume, and hereafter the pages, four 
to each number, will be numbered in succes 
sion. The Sacred History \vill be given 
monthly only 16 pages to each number. I 
commence again from the very beginning, 
having Father St. Onge s translation." 

Most of the matter given is of a religious 
character, the Sacred History series of articles 
being the most extensive. Beginning with no. 
13, each issue contains a list of the feast and 
fast days for the ensuing week, and with no. 15 
the gospels of the various Sundays are given. 
A Chinook vocabulary appears in the first 
three numbers, and a list of phrases in the 
fourth. 

During October, 1892, 1 received from Father 
Le Jeune copies of a reissue of nos. 1-8 of the 
Wawa, paged 1-40, all in 16, and containing for 
the most part the material given in the origi 
nals. They are dated May, June, July, 
August, September, November, and December, 
1892, and January, 1893, four pages each, con 
secutively paged. To these is added a sup 
plemental signature, paged 33-40, headed 
"Success of the Duployan Shorthand among 
the natives of British Columbia," 

There have also been issued two "Supple 
ments to the Kamloops Wawa" "Chicago 
World s Fair Notes," numbered 1 and 2, and 
dated respectively November 1 and 8, 1892, each. 



Le Jeune (J. M. R.) Continued. 

containing four pages, numbered 1-8. The first 
contains an illustration of a TJ. S. coast line 
battle ship, the second one of the Manufactures 
and Liberal Arts Building. 

There is also a third of these extras, a single 
quarto page headed : " Chicago News, Supple 
ment to the Kamloops Wawa. No. 1, Nov. 1st, 
1892," at the top of which is the picture of the 
battle ship. 

My inquiries in regard to these stray issues 
met with the following response from Father 
Le Jeune : 

"In answer to your letter of Nov. 1, 1892, 
pages 1-40 you mention are simply a new edi 
tion of the first eight numbers. As you see by 
the first numbers I sent you, I did not exactly 
know Avhat my little paper was going to be. 
Now that the Indians want their papers bound, 
I find those first numbers exhausted. Besides, 
numbers 5, 6, 7, and 8 were never properly num 
bered; so I made this new edition of eight 
numbers to be used as heading for the volume. 
I endeavored to get into these eight numbers 
what constitutes the first text-book for Indian 
students, so that they can be used separately. 
Now the collection follows in consecutive num 
bers, 1, 2, 3, etc., to 18, no. 19 [except the sacred 
history supplement] being skipped by mistake ; 
then 20-31, supplements to uos. 15-32, save no. 
22, omitted also by mistake ; then from no. 32 on 
in regular order. I reprint some of the run-out 
numbers of vol. I to complete the sets sent me 
for binding, and redress as much as I can my 
former incorrectness of pagination. Concern 
ing the pages " Success of the Duployan," etc., 
I have given tip the idea of embodying them 
into something else; so they remain as they 
are, a letter of information to correspondents. 
The " Chicago News " supplement and any other 
I may hereafter produce are separate pages 
which I shall issue at my convenience to inter 
est the Indians and give them some useful 
information, but without binding myself to 
issue them regularly. They are rather essays 
than anything else." 

The supplemental signature of no. 8 of the 
reissue of the Wawa contains so many interest 
ing facts bearing upon Father Le Jeune swork 
and upon the methods used in this new depart 
ure in periodical making that I give it here 
with in full. 
Siiccess of the Duployan Shorthand among the 

natives of British Columbia. 
" The Duployan system of stenography made 
its apparition in France in 1867. The 
orginators are the Duploye brothers, two of 
whom are members of the clergy and two 
others eminent stenographers in Paris. Father 
Le Jeune became acquainted with the system 
in 1871, being then 16 years old, and learned in 
a few hours. Two or three days after he 
wrote to Mr. E. Duploye and by return mail 
received a very encouraging letter. H.e found 
the knowledge of shorthand very p 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



49 



lie Jeuiie (J. M. R.) Continued. 

ever since, either for taking down notes or for 
correspondence. It was only in July, 1890, that 
the idea first came to try the shorthand as an 
easy phonetic writing for the Indians of British 
Columbia. The first trial became a success. 
At the end of September, 1800, a poor Indian 
cripple, named Charley- Alexis Mayoos, from 
the Lower Nicola, saw the writing for the first 
time, and got the intuition of the system at first 
sight. He set to decipher a few pages of Indian 
prayers in shorthand. In less than tAVO months 
he learned every word of them, and he soon 
began to communicate his learning to his 
friends and relatives. 

"Through his endeavors some eight or ten 
Indians at Cold water Nicola, B. C., became 
thoroughly acquainted with the writing system 
before April 1st, 1891. In July, 1891, the first 
lessons were given to the Shushwap Indians ; 
they lasted an hour every day for four or five 
days. Three or four of the best joung men 
went on studying what they had learned, and 
were delighted to find themselves able to 
correspond in shorthand in the early fall. 
During the winter mouths they helped to prop 
agate the system of writing among their people. 
In the meantime Mayoos had come to Kam- 
loops and was pushing the work ahead among 
the young people there. 

In December, 1891, the system was intro 
duced to the North Thomson Indians ; in Jan 
uary, 1892, to those at Douglas Lake ; in Febru 
ary at Spuzzum and North Bend ; and, last of 
all, in March, to those at Deadman s Creek, 
near Sarviua. Soon after, Indian letters came 
from William s Lake. In May, 1892, a few 
lessons were given at St. Mary s Mission to 
the Lower Fraser and seacoast Indians. Now 
the Indians teach each other and are very 
anxious to learn on all sides. The most 
advanced understand the value of the letters 
and the spelling of the words ; but the greatest 
number begin by reading the words, then learn 
the syllables by comparing the words together, 
and at last come to the letters. They learn by 
analysis and much quicker than by synthesis. 

"The Kamloop Wawa was first issued in 
May, 1891, and in eight monthly numbers gave 
the rudiments of stenography and the Chinook 
hymns as first Chinook reader. 

"With no. 9, February 1st, 1892, it has become 
weekly, and has ever since continued to reach 
every week the ever increasing number of sub 
scribers. It is now issued/ at 250 copies, 4 
pages, 12mo, weekly. A supplement of equal 
size issued whenever convenient. The first 
volume of the Kamloops Wawa closed last 
June with number 32. Vol. II will terminate 
with no. 58, Dec. 25, 1892. Contents: 1" Ele 
ments of Stenography in Chinook and English. 
2 Chinook and Latin Hymns. 3 A number of 
Indian news. 4 Beginning of Sacred History. 
5 Weekly Calendar beginning with March 1st, 
92. 6 Gospel for every Sunday. 7 Some 
prayers in Sliushwap. 8- A few hymns in 
CHIN 4 



lie Jeuiie (J. M. R.) Continued. 

Shushwap and Chinook. 9" A few English 
lessons. See nos. 33, 34, 35. 10" Narratives of 
early Church History, St. Mary Magdalen, St. 
James, etc. 

" The Kamloops Phonographer had its first 
number issued in June, 1892. Six numbers are 
now ready, illustrating: 1 How shorthand is 
taught to the natives. 2 U Alphabet and rules 
of shorthand. 3 Syllables and syllabical 
tables. 4 1st reading books of shorthand 16 
pages monthly. The intention is, in the follow 
ing numbers, to make a study of abbreviative 
phonography, showing how outlines can be 
made according to the Duployan system. We 
do not pretend to teach shorth. ex professo, but 
only to give to those interested all the informa 
tion that we can concerning our little work. 

[Seven numbers are issued, the last in Janu 
ary, 1893, none containing Chinookan material.] 

"In preparation : 1 A second edition of the 
Chinook and English Vocabulary. 2 Al 
manac for 1893, of which these pages are 
intended to become a part. 3 A Chinook trans 
lation, by Rt. Rev. Bishop Durieu [</.] from 
New Westminster, of Bishop Gilmour s Bible 
History. 200 copies of the English text have 
been received through the kindness of Rev. L. 
N. St. Onge, Troy, N. Y. These will be inter 
leaved with the Chinook text so as to present 
the illustrations of the original, and the English 
text opposite its Chinook version. 

"Some will ask: How are all these works 
issued? Up to date nearly all the work, auto 
graphing and duplicating on the mimeograph, 
has been done by the author during the leisure 
hours of his missionary labors. But that course 
can not be carried on any longer. Hired work 
has to be taken in. A few Indian women are 
already trained to do the printing. With their 
cooperation 16 pages can be printed on 200 to 
250 copies in a day. But that work has to be 
paid for ; and the resources are at an end. Peo 
ple have first wondered at the work ; some find 
fault with it ; very little thus far has been done 
to help it. 

" Now is the time for the friends of a good 
cause to see if something better could not be 
done in favor of this little work. Voluntary 
donations will be accepted as a providential 
blessing. Subscriptions to papers are also a 
powerful means of support and improvement. 
Many say : "We do not want to study the pho 
nography." But could they not take the papers 
as specimens of curiosity, etc., in their libraries ? 
The first volume of the Kamloops Wawa is now 
bound, and would make a very interesting item 
in any library. Price only $1.50. Send $2.50 
and have the numbers of the Kamloops Pho 
nographer as well. Please induce your friends 
to contribute according to their means. By 
doing so, you by all means shall help to 
enlighten many who are still sitting in dark 
ness and in the shadow of death." 

The periodical is almost entirely the work of 
Pere Le Jeune, but few contributions of Jar- 



50 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



1 




FACSIMILE OF COVER TITLE OF LE JEUNE S JARGON HYMN BOOK. 



lie Jeune (J. M. R.) Continued. 

gon material appearing from other hands. The 
only exceptions I have discovered are short 
articles in nos. 24, 34, and 35, from the pen of 
Dr. T. S. Buhner, and occasionally one from 
Father St. Qnge. 

An independent issue of the Wawa appeared 
under date of June 1, 1891, numbered 1; and 
two of the issues are in double numbers, 5-6, 
and [7-8] ; these latter, 32 in size, lack the j 
beading as given in the periodical proper and 
evidently were not intended originally as a part 
of the series. The titles of these three issues 
are as follows : 

[ ] [Two linos stenographic charac 
ters.] | No. 1. Kami oops Wawa. 1 Ju. 91 

No title page, heading on cover as above; 
text, headed " Chinook Vocabulary," pp. 1-32, 
advertisement on back cover, 16. 

On the front cover following the heading are 
fcwb columns ttT niatiter, oae iii Knglisfe, italic 



lie Jeune (J. M. R.) Continued. 

characters, headed "Chinook vocabulary," the 
second in Jargon, stenographic characters. 
The vocabulary, alphabetically arranged, triple 
columns, Jargon, shorthand, and English, pp. 
1-21. Chinook hymns, pp. 23-32. 
Copies seen : Pilling. 

[ ] [Two lines stenographic charac 
ters.] | Kainloops Wawa, | September, 
1891 | Nos 5 & 6. | Chinook Hymns, j 
[One line stenographic characters.] 

[Kamloops, B. C. : 1891.] 

Cover title verso the alphabet, no inside title; 
text (in stenographic characters, headings in 
Jargon and Latin in italics) pp. 1-32, alphabet 
and numerals on recto of back cover, list of 
publications by Father Le Jeuue verso of back 
cover, 32. See the facsimile of the cover title. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 

Issued also with cover title as follows: 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



51 



Le Jeune (J. M. R.) Continued. 
T ] [Two lines stenographic charac 
ters.] | Chinook Hymns. | 

Kamloops. B. C. | 1891 

Cover title verso alphabet and numerals, no 
inside title; text in stenographic characters 
pp. 1-32, alphabet recto of back cover, list of 
publications by Father Le Jeune verso of back 
cover, 32. 

Contents as under title next above ; the verso 
of the front cover in the one edition forms the 
recto of the back cover in the other. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 

[ ] Elements | of | short hand. | Part 

I. I 

Kamloops. | 1891 

Cover title verso the alphabet, text pp. [1-32], 
alphabet and numerals recto of back cover, list 
of publications by Father Le Jeune verso of 
back cover, 32. Inserted by Father Le Jeune 
as a substitute for the lacking nos. 7-8 of the 
Kamloops Wawa, Oct., 1891. 

Contains no Chinookan material. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 

[ ] Chinook j primer. | By which | 

The Native of British Columbia | and 
any other persons | Speaking the Chi 
nook | are taught | to read and write 
Chinook | in Shorthand | in the Space 
of a few hours. | Price : 10 Cents. | 

Mimeographed at | St Louis Mis 
sion. | Kamloops, B. C. | May, 1892. 

Cover title as above, verso advertisement, no 
inside title ; text pp. 1-8, advertisement recto of 
back cover, verso list of publications by Father 
Le Jeune, 16. 

See p. 52 for facsimile of the cover title. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 

A comparison of th facsimiles of the title- 
pages of the hymn book and primer with the 
printed text of the same will show a few differ 
ences of punctuation. The printed text is cor 
rect; the facsimiles are defective in that re 
spect. 

A play | in Chinook. | Joseph and 

his Brethren. | Act I. | By J. M. R. 
Le Jeune O. M. I. 

Kamloops, B. C. | July 1 s * 1892. 

Cover title (manuscript, in the handwriting 
of its author), no inside title; text (in Chinook 
Jargon, stenographic characters) pp. 1-20, 16. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 

Chinook | First Reading Book | in 
cluding | Chinook Hymns, Syllabary | 
and Vocabulary. | By | J. M. R. Le Jeune 
O. M. I. | Price: 10 Cents. | [Eight 
lines stenographic characters.] | 

Kamloops. | 1893 

Title verso Chinook alphabet 1 1. text in 
stenographic characters, Avith headings in Eng 
lish and Jargon in italics, pp. 1-[18], 16. 



Le Jeune (J. M. R.) Continued. 

Hymns, pp. 1-11. Exercises, pp. 12-15. 
Vocabulary, pp. 16-18. 
Copies seen : Pilling. 

- See Durieu (P.) 

Pere Jean-Marie Raphael Le Jeune was born 
at Pleybert Christ, Finistere, France, April 12, 
1855, and came to British Columoia as a mis 
sionary priest in October, 1879. He made his 
first acquaintance with the Thompson India ns 
in June, 1880, and has been among them ever 
since. He began at once to study their lan 
guage and was able to express himself easily 
in that language after a few months. When he 
first came he found about a dozen Indians that 
knew a fe\v prayers and a little of a catechism 
in the Thompson language, composed mostly 
by Right Rev. Bishop Durieu, O. M. I., the 
present bishop of New Westminster. From 
1880 to 1882 he traveled only between Yale and 
Lytton, 57 miles, trying to make acquaintance 
with as many natives as he could in that dis 
trict. Since 1882 he has had to visit also the 
Nicola Indians, who speak the Thompson lan 
guage and the Douglas Lake Indians, who 
are a branch of the Okanagan family, and had 
occasion to become acquainted with the Okan 
agan language, in which he composed and 
revised most of the prayers they have in use up 
to the present. Since June 1, 1891, he has also 
had to deal with the Shushwap Indians, and, 
as the language is similar to that in use by the 
Indians of Thompson River, he very soon 
became familiar with it. 

He tried several years ago to teach the In 
dians to read in the English characters, but 
without avail, and two years ago he undertook 
to teach them in shorthand, experimenting first 
upon a young Indian boy who learned the short 
hand after a single lesson and began to help, 
him teach the others. The work went on 
slowly until last winter, when they began to be 
interested in it all over the country, and since 
then they have been learning it with eagerness 
and teaching it to one another. 

Leland (Charles Godfrey). The Chinook 
Jargon. 

In St. James Gazette, vol. 17, no. 2529, p. 6, 
London, July 13, 1888, folio. (Pilling.) 

General remarks concerning the language, 
with words, phrases, and sentences therein. 

[ ] An international idiom. 

In the Saturday Review, vol. 30, no. 1822, pp. 
377-378, London, Sept. 27, 1890, folio. 

A review of Hale (H.), An international 
idiom, giving a number of examples. 

Lenox: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler in the Lenox Library, New York City. 

[Lionnet (Pere ).] Vocabulary | of the 
| Jargon or trade language | of Oregon. 



52 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 




PRIMER 



7 W Nati vts i 
Uxw vi 

Speaki>u 



. 

K. CpUfmtfit 

p ev*s OT\ r 



. 

brtoul oAvd vufite Crvi^ook 
Wu. ShoKKoc/Nvd 
Spau- of a \vw Ki^u^S. 



a . it) Ce/nK. 



JVUvvuoarapkecl at" 
Si Louis Mi ssiovu 
Ka/vv Aoops, ~$ C- 
May IMi. 



FACSIMILE OF COVER TITLE OF LE JEUNE S JARGON PRIMER. 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



53 



Liomiet (Pere ) Continued. 

Colophon: Published by the Smith 
sonian institution, | Washington, D. 
C., | April, 1853. 

No title page, heading only; letter of Prof. 
Henry and report of Prof. W. W. Turner 1 1. 
text pp. 1-22, 8 form on 4 page. 

French, English, and Jargon vocabulary, 
alphabetically arranged by French words, pp. 
1-22. 

"Dr. B. Rush Mitchell, of the United States 
Navy, recently presented to the Smithsonian 
Institution a manuscript vocabulary, in French 
and Indian, obtained in Oregon, and said to 
have been compiled by a French Catholic priest. 
It was submitted for critical examination to 
Prof. W. W. Turner, and in accordance with his 
suggestion the vocabulary has been ordered to 
be printed for distribution in Oregon." Ext met 
from letter of Prof. Henry. 

"Some years ago the Smithsonian Institu 
tion printed a small vocabulary of the Chinook 
Jargon, furnished by Dr. R. B. Mitchell, of the 
U. S. Navy, and prepared, as I afterward 
learned, by Mr. Lionnet, a Catholic priest, for 
his own use while studying the language at 
Chinook Point." Extract from the preface of 
Gibbx s Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon. 

Copies seen: Georgetown, Pilling, Smithson 
ian. 
Lord s prayer: 

Cascade See Youth s. 

Chinook Bergholtz (G. F.) 

Chinook Duflot de Mofras (E.) 

Chinook Jargon Bancroft (H. H.) 

Chinook Jargon Bolduc (J. B. Z.) 

Chinook Jargon Bulmer (T. S.) 

Chinook Jargon Chinook. 

Chinook Jargon Dictionary. 

Chinook Jargon Eells (M.) 

Chinook Jargon Evei ette (W. E.) 

Chinook Jargon Gribbs (G.) 

Chinook Jargon Gill (J. K.) 

Chinook Jargon Good (J. B.) 

Chinook Jargon Hale (H.) 

Chinook Jargon Marietti (P.) 

Chinook Jargon Nicoll (E. F.) 

Lowdermilk : This word followinga title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy 
of the work referred to has been seen by the 
compiler in the bookstore of W. H. Lowder- 
niilk & Co., Washington, D. C. 

Ludewig (Hermann Ernst). The | liter 
ature | of | American aboriginal lan 
guages. | By | Hermann E. Ludewig. | 
With additions and corrections | by 
professor Wm. W. Turner. | Edited by 
Nicolas Triibner. | 

London: | Triibner and co., 60, Pater 
noster row. | MDCCCLVIII [1838]. 

Half-title "Triibner s bibliotheca glottica 
I" verso blank 1 1. title as above verso printer 
1 1. preface pp. v-viii, contents verso blank 1 1. 



Ludewig (H. E.) Continued. 

editor s advertisement pp. ix-xii, biographical 
memoir pp. xiii-xiv, introductory bibliograph 
ical notices pp. xv-xxiv, text pp. 1-209, addenda 
pp. 210-246, index pp. 247-256, errata pp. 257-258, 
8. Arranged alphabetically by languages. 
Addenda by Wm. W. Turner and Nicholas 
Triibner, pp. 210-246. 

Contains a list of grammars and vocabularies 
of the languages of the American peoples, 
among them the following : 

American languages generally, pp. xv-xxiv ; 
Chinuk and Chinuk Jargon, pp. 40-41, 47. 

Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, 
Eames, Georgetown, Pilling. 

At the Fischer sale, no. 990, a copy brought 5*. 
6d. ; at the Field sale, no. 1403, $2.63; at the 
Squiersale, no. 699, $2.62; another copy, no. 1906, 
$2.38. Priced by Leclerc, 1878, no. 2075, 15 fr. 
The Pinart copy, no. 565, sold for 25 fr., and 
the Murphy copy, no. 1540, for $2.50. 

"Dr. Ludewig has himself so fully detailed 
the plan and purport of this work that little 
more remains for me to add beyond the mere 
statement of the origin of my connection with 
the publication and the mention of such addi 
tions for which I am alone responsible, and 
which, during its progress through the press, 
have gradually accumulated to about one-sixth 
of the whole. This is but an act of j ustice to the 
memory of Dr. Ludewig. because at the time of 
his death, in December, 1856, no more than 172 
pages were printed off, and these constitute the 
only portion of the work which had the benefit 
of his valuable personal and final revision. 

"Similarity of pursuits led, during my stay 
in New York in 1855, to an intimacy with Dr. 
Ludewig, during which he mentioned that he, 
like myself, had been making bibliographical 
memoranda for years of all books which serve 
to illustrate the history of spoken language. 
As a first section of a more extended Avork on 
the literary history of language generally, he 
had prepared a bibliographical memoir of the 
remains of aboriginal languages of America. 
The manuscript had been deposited by him in 
the library of the Ethnological Society at New 
York, but at my request he at once most kindly 
placed it at my disposal, stipulating only that 
it should be printed in Europe, under my per 
sonal superintendence. 

"Upon my return to England, I lost no time 
in carrying out the trust thus confided to me, 
intending then to confine myself simply to pro 
ducing a correct copy of ray friend s manuscript. 
But it soon became obvious that the transcript 
had been hastily made, and but for the valuable 
assistance of literary friends, both in this 
country and in America, the work would prob 
ably have been abandoned. My thanks are more 
particularly due to Mr. E. G. Squier, and to 
Prof. William W. Turner, of Washington, by 
whose considerate and valuable cooperation 
many difficulties were cleared away and my edi 
torial labors greatly lightened. This encouraged 
me to spare neither personal labor nor expense 



54 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Ludewig (IT. E. ) Continued. 

in the attempt to render the work as perfect as 
possible, with what success must be left to 
the jud gment of those who can fairly appreciate 
the labors of a pioneer in any new field of lit 
erary research." Editor s advertisement. 

"Dr. Ludewig, though but little known in 
this country [England], was held in consider 
able esteem as a jurist, both in Germany and the 
United States of America. Born at Dresden in 
1809, with but little exception he continued to 
reside in his native city until 1844, when he emi 
grated to America ; but, though in both coun 
tries he practiced law as a profession, his bent 
was the study of literary history, which was 
evidenced by his Livre des Ana, Essai de 
Catalogue Manuel, published at his own cost 
in 1837, and by his Bibliothekonomie, which 
appeared a few years later. 

" But even while thus eneaged he delighted 
in investigating the rise and progressof the land 
of his subsequent adoption, and his researches 
into the vexed question of the origin of the peo 
pling of America gained him the highest consid 
eration, on both sides of the Atlantic, as a man 
of original and inquiring mind. He was a 
contributor to Naumann s Serapasurn; and 
among the chief of his contributions to that 
journal may be mentioned those on American 
Libraries, on the Aids to American Bibliog 
raphy, and on the Book Trade of the United 
States of America. In 1846 appeared his Lit 
erature of American Local History, a work of 
much importance and which required no small 
amount of labor and perseverance, owing to the 
necessity of consulting the many and widely 
scattered materials, which had to be sought out 
from apparently the most unlikely channels. 

"These studies formed a natural introduc 
tion to the present work on The Literature of 
American Aboriginal Languages, which occu 
pied his leisure concurrently with the others, 
and the printing of which was commenced in 



Ludewig (H. E.) Continued. 

August, 1856, but which he did not live to see 
launched upon the world ; for at the date of his 
death, on the 12th of December following, only 
172 pages were in type. It had been a labor of 
love with him for years ; and, if ever author 
were mindful of the nonuin prematur in annum, 
he was when he deposited his manuscript in the 
library of the American Ethnological Society, 
diffident hixuself as to its merits and value on a 
subject of such paramount interest. He had 
satisfied himself that in due time the reward of 
his patient industry might be the production of 
some more extended national work on the sub 
ject, and with this he was contented ; for it was . 
a distinguishing feature in his character, not 
withstanding his great and varied knowledge! 
and brilliant acquirements, to disregard his.. 
own toil, even amounting to drudgery if need 
ful, if he could in any way assist the promul 
gation of literature and science. 

"Dr. Ludewig was a corresponding member- 
of many of the most distinguished European 
and American literary societies, and few meni 
were held in greater consideration by scholars : 
both in America and Germany, as will readily be. 
acknowledged should his voluminous corre 
spondence ever see the light. In private life lie. 
was distinguished by the best qualities which: 
endear a man s memory to those who survive 
him : he was a kind and affectionate husbamL 
and a sincere friend. Always accessible and! 
ever ready to aid and counsel those who applied 
to him for advice upon matters pertaining to 
literature, his loss will long be felt by a most 
extended circle of friends, and in him Germany 
mourns one of the best representatives of her 
learned men in America, a genuine type of a 
class in which, with singular felicity, to genius 
of the highest order is combined a painstaking 
and plodding perseverance but seldom met with 
beyond theconfines of the Fatherland. "Bio 
graphic memoir. 



M. 



Macdonald (Duncan George Forbes). 
British Columbia | and | Vancouver s 
island | comprising | a description of 
these dependencies: their physical | 
character, climate, capabilities, popu 
lation, trade, natural history, | geology, 
ethnology, gold-fields, and future pros 
pects | also | An Account of the Man 
ners and Customs of the Native Indians 
| by | Duncan George Forbes Macdon 
ald, C. E. | (Late of the Government 
Survey Staff of British Columbia, 
and of the International Boundary | 
Line of North America) Author of 
What the Farmers may do with the | 



Macdonald (D. G. F.) Continued. 
Land The Paris Exhibition 7 Deci 
mal Coinage &c. | With a comprehen 
sive map. | 

London | Longman, Green, Longman, 
Roberts, & Green | 1862. 

Half-title verso name of printer 1 1. title 
verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vii, contents pp. 
ix-xiii, text pp. 1-442, appendices pp. 443-524, 
map, 8. 

Vocabulary of the Chinook Jargon and Eng 
lish equivalent terms (375 words and 10 phrases 
and sentences), pp. 394-398. 

Copies seen : British Museum, Congress. 

Sabin s Dictionary, no. 43149, mentions: Sec 
ond edition, London, Longmans, 1863, 8. 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



55 



Macfie (Matthew). Vancouver Island 
and | British Columbia. | Their his 
tory, resources, and prospects. | By | 
Matthew Macfie, F. R. G. S. | Five years 
resident in Victoria, V. I. | 

London: | Longman, Green, Long 
man, Roberts, & Green. | 1865. 

Half-title verso name of printer 1 1. frontis 
piece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso 
blank 1 1. preface pp. ix-xii, contents pp. xii- 
xxi, list of illustrations verso blank 1 1. text pp. 
1-518, appendix pp. 519-558, index pp. 559-574. 8. 

A few sentences in the Chinook Jargon, pp. 
472-473. 

Copies seen : Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, 
British Museum, Congress, Geological Survey, 
Pilling. 

Macleod (Eev. Xavier Donald) . History 
of the devotion | to the | blessed virgin 
Mary | in | North America. | By | the 
rev. Xavier Donald Macleod, | professor 
[&c. two lines.] | With a memoir of 
the author, | by | the most rev. John B. 
Purcell, D. D., | archbishop of Cincin 
nati. | 

New York : | Virtue & Yorston, | 12 
Dey street. [Copyright 1866.] 

Frontispiece, title verso copyright notice 1 1. 
publishers notice pp. iii-iv, inscription to the 
memory of the author verso blank 1 1. contents 
pp. 5-7, verso blank, memoir by Purcell pp. 
ix-xxiii verso blank, engraving, text pp. 1-461 
verso blank, index pp. 463-467, 8. 

Hymn to the Blessed Mary, in the Chinook 
Jargon, p. 255. 

Copies seen: British Museum, Congress, 
Georgetown. 

History | of | Roman Catholicism | 

in | North America. | By | the rev. 
Xavier Donald MacLeod, | professor 
[&c. one line.] | With a memoir of the 
author, | by | the most rev. John B. 
Purcell, D. D., | archbishop of Cincin 
nati. | 

New York : | Virtue & Yorston, | 12 
Dey street. [186-?] 

Portrait 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. publishers 
notice pp. iii-iv, contents pp.v-vii, dedication 
verso blank 1 1. memoir pp. ix-xxiii, text pp. 
1-461, index pp. 463-467, 8. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above, 
p. 255. 

Copies seen : Boston Athenaeum. 

Xavier Donald McLeod, author, born in New 
York city, November 17, 1821 ; died near Cincin 
nati, Ohio, July 20, 1865 ; studied at Columbus, 
and surprised his family and friends by taking 
orders in the Protestant Episcopal church in 
1845. After spending a few years in a country 
parish, he went in 1850 to Europe, where he 



Macleod (X. D.) Continued. 

traveled and studied until 1852. The result of 
his European visit was Ids conversion to the 
Roman Catholic faith. In 1857 he became edi 
torially connected with the St. Louis Leader." 
Subsequently he was ordained a priest, and 
appointed professor of rhetoric and belles- 
lettres at Mount St. Mary s college, Ohio. He 
met his death in a railroad accident. Apple- 
ton s Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

Maisonneuve : This word following a title or 
included within parentheses after a note .ndi- 
cates that a copy of the work referred to has 
been seen by the compiler in the bookstore of 
Maisonneuve et Cie., Paris, France. 

Mallet : This word following a title or inclosed 
within parentheses after a note indicates that 
a copy of the work referred to has been seen by 
the compiler in the library of Major Edmond 
Mallet, Washington, D. C. 

Marietti (Pietro), editor. Oratio Domi 
nica ! in CCL. lingvas versa | et j CLXXX. 
charactervm formis | vel uostratibvs vel 
peregrinis expressa | cvrante | Petro 
Marietti j Eqvite Typographo Pontificio 
| Socio Administro | Typographei | S. 
Consilii de Propaganda Fide | [Print 
er s device] | 

Romae | AnnoM. DCCC. LXX [1870]. 

Half-title 1 1. title 1 1. dedication 3 11. pp. xi- 
xxvii, 1-319, indexes 4 11. 4. 

Includes 59 versions of the Lord s prayer in 
various American dialects, among them the 
Oregonice, p. 303. 

Copies seen: Trumbull. 

Massachusetts Historical Society : These words 
following a title or within parentheses after a 
note indicate that a copy of the work referred 
to has been seen by the compiler in the library 
of that society, Boston, Mass. 

Missionary s Companion. See Demers 

(M.) etal. 

Montgomerie (Lieut. JohnEglinton) and 
De Horsey (A. F. R.) A | few words | 
collected from the | languages | spoken 
by the Indians | in the neighbourhood 
of the | Columbia River & Puget s 
Sound. | By John E. Montgomerie, 
Lieutenant R. N. | and Algernon F. R. 
De Horsey, Lieutenant, R. R. | 

London : | printed by George Odell, 
18 Princess-street, Cavendish-square. | 
1848. 

Title verso blank 1 1. introduction pp. iii-iv, 
text pp. 5-30, 12. 

Vocabulary of the Chinook, Clikitat, Cas 
cade and Squally languages, pp. 1-23. Numer 
als in Chinook Jargon, p. 23. Numerals in 



56 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Montgomerie (J. E.) Continued. 

Squally, p. 24. Chinook proper and Chehalis 
numbers, p. 24. Names of places, pp. 25-28. 
Corruptions used in the trading language, pp. 
28-30. 

Copies seen: British Museum, Sir Thomas 
Phillips, Cheltenham, England. 

M tiller (Friedrich). Grundriss j der | 
Sprachwissenschaft | von | D r . Fried- 
rich Miiller | Professor[&c. three lines.] 
| I. Band | I. Abtheilung. | Einleitung 
in die Sprachwissenschaft[-IV. Band. 
| I. AbtheiJung. | Nachtrlige zum Grund 
riss aus den Jahren | 1877-1887] . | 

Wien 1876 [-1888]. j Alfred Holder |.K. 
K. Universitats-Buchhiindler. | Roth- 
enthurmstrasse 15. 

4 vols. (vol. 1 in 2 parts, vol. 2 originally in 4 
divisions, vol. 3 originally in 4 divisions, vol. 4 



Miiller (F.) Continued. 

part 1 all published), each part and division 
with an ontside title and two inside titles, 8 

Vol. 2, part 1, which includes the American 
languages, was originally issued in two divi 
sions, each with the following special title : 

DieSprachen | der | schlichthaarigenRassen 
| von | D r . Friedrich Miiller | Professor [<fcc. 
eight lines.] | I. Abtheilung. | DieSprachen der 
australischen, der hyperboreischen | und der 
amerikanischen Rasse[,nc]. | 

Wien 1879[-1882]. | Alfred Holder | X. K. 
Hof-und Universitats-Buchhiindler | Rothen- 
thurmstrasse 15. 

Die Sprache der Tsliinuk, vol. 2, part 1, 
division 2 (pp. 254-256) includes : Die Laute. p. 
254. Das Nomen, p. 254. Das Pronomen, p. 
255. Das Verbum, pp. 255-256. Die Zahlen- 
ausdriicke, p. 256. 

Copies seen : Astor, British Museum, Bureau 
of Ethnology, Eames, Watkiuson. 



National Museum: These words following a title 
or within parentheses after a note indicate that 
a copy of the work referred to has been seen 
by the compiler in the library of that institu 
tion, Washington, D. C. 

New. The New Testament in Chinook. 

In the New York Times, Oct. 12, 1890. 
(Eames.) 

A short extract from a sermon in the Chinook 
Jargon, with literal English translation. 

Copied from The Academy. (*) 

New edition. Dictionary of the Chinook 
Jargon. See Dictionary. 

Nicoll (Edward Holland). The Chinook 
language or Jargon. 

In Popular Science Monthly, vol. 35, pp. 257- 
261, New York, 1889, 8. (Bureau of Ethnology, 
Pilling.) 

A conversation in Chinook Jargon, with 
English translation, p. 257. Origin of the 
Chinook Jargon, showing many words derived 
from the English, French, Chinook, Chehalis, 
etc., onomatopoeia, prefixes, etc., pp. 257-259. 
Numerals 1-11, 20, 100, p. 260. Lord s prayer, 
with interlinear English translation, p. 260. 

Nihaloth: 

Vocabulary See Hale (H.) 

Norris (Philetus W. ) The 1, calumet of the 
Coteau, \ and other | poetical legends of 
the border. | Also, | a glossary of Indian 
names, words, and | western provin 
cialisms. I Together with | a guide-book 
| of the j Yellowstone national park. | 
By P. W. Norris, | five years super! u- 



Norris (P. W.) Continued, 
tendent of the Yellowstone national 
park. | All rights reserved. | 

Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippiucott & 
co. 1 1883. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright notice 
1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. poem verso blank 
1 1. introduction pp. 9-12, contents pp. 13-14, 
illustrations verso blank 1 1. text pp. 17-170, 
notes pp. 171-221, glossary pp. 223-233, guide 
book pp. 235-275, map, sm. 8. 

Glossary of Indian words and provincialisms, 
pp. 223-233, contains a number of Chinook 
Jargon words. 

Copies seen: National Museum, Pilling, Pow 
ell. 
Numerals : 

Chinook 

Chinook 

Chinook 

Chinook 

Chinook 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 

Chinook Jargon 



See Boas (F.) 

Duflot de Mofraa (E.) 
Eells (M.) 
Haldeman (S. S.) 
Ross (A.) 
Cox (II.) 
Dictionary. 
Gill (J. K.) 
Good(J.B.) 
Haines (E.M.) 
Hale(H.) 
Hazlitt(W. C.) 
Moiitgomerie (J. E.) 
Nicoll (E. F.) 
Palmer (J.) 
Parker (S.) 
Richardson (A. D.) 
Stuart (G.) 
Swan (J. G.) 
Tate(C.M.) 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



57 



P. 



Palmer (Joel). Journal of travels | over 
the | Rocky mountains, | to the | 
mouth of the Columbia river; | made 
during the years 1845 and 1846 : | con 
taining minute descriptions of the | 
valleys of the Willamette, Umpqua, 
and Clamet; | a general description of 
| Oregon territory; | its inhabitants, 
climate, soil, ^productions, etc., etc. ; 
| a list of | necessary outfits for emi 
grants; | and a | Table of Distances 
from Camp to Camp on the Route. | 
Also; | A Letter from the Rev. H. H. 
Spalding, resident Missionary, for the 
last ten years, | among the Nez Perc6 
Tribe of Indians, on the Koos-koos-kee 
River ; The | Organic Laws of Oregon 
Territory ; Tables of about 300 words 
of the Chinook | Jargon, and about 200 
Words of the Nez Perc<5 Language; a 
Description of | Mount Hood; Inci 
dents of Travel, &c., &c. | By Joel 
Palmer. | 

Cincinnati : | J. A. & U. P. James, 
Walnut street, | between Fourth and 
Fifth. | 1847. 

Cover title : Journal of travels | over the | 
Rocky mountains, | to the | mouth of the 
Columbia river; | made during the years 1845 
and 1846. | By Joel Palmer. | 

Cincinnati: | J. A. & U. P. James, "Walnut 
street, | between Fourth and Fifth. | 1847. 

Cover title, title verso copyright notice etc. 1 
1. publishers statement pp. iii-iv, text pp. 9-189, 
errata slip, 12. 

Words (200) used in the Chinook Jargon, 
alphabetically arranged by Jargon words, pp. 
147-151. Chinook mode of computing numbers 
(1-500), p. 152. 

Copies seen: British Museum, Congress, 
Harvard. 

Journal of travels j over the | Rocky 

mountains, | to the | mouth of the 
Columbia river ;| made during the years 
1845 and 1846: | containing minute 
descriptions of the | valleys of the 
Willamette, Unipqua, and Clamet ; | a 
general description of | Oregon terri 
tory; | its inhabitants, climate, soil, 
productions, etc., etc. ; | a list of | 
necessary outfits for emigrants; | and 
a | Table of Distances from Camp to 
Camp on the Route. | Also ; | A Letter 
from the Rev. H. H. Spaldiug, resident 
Missionary, for the last ten years, 



Palmer (J.) Continued. 

among the Nez Perce" Tribe of Indians, 
on the Koos-koos-kee River; The | 
Organic Laws of Oregon Territory; 
Tables of about 300 words of the Chi 
nook | Jargon, and about 200 Words of 
the Nez Perc6 Language ; a Description 
of | Mount Hood ; Incidents of Travel, 
&c., &c. | By Joel Palmer. | 

Cincinnati: | J. A. & IT. P. James, 
Walnut street, | between Fourth and 
Fifth. | 1850. 

Title verso copyright notice etc. 1 1. publish 
ers statement pp. iii-iv, text pp. 9-189, 12. 

Linguistic contents as Tinder title next above. 

Copies seen: British Museum. 

Journal of travels | over the | Rocky 
mountains, | to the | mouth of the 
Columbia river;) made during the years 
1845 and 1846: | containing minute 
descriptions of the | valleys of the 
Willamette, Umpqua, and Clainet; j a 
general description of | Oregon terri 
tory; | its inhabitants, climate, soil, 
productions, etc., etc. ; | a list of | 
necessary outfits for emigrants; | and 
a | Table of Distances from Camp to 
Camp on the Route. | Also ; | A Letter 
from the Rev. II. H. Spalding, resident 
Missionary, for the last ten years, | 
among the Nez Perce Tribe of Indians, 
on the Koos-koos-kee River; The | 
Organic Laws of Oregon Territory; 
Tables of about 300 words of the Chi 
nook | Jargon, and about 200 Words of 
the Nez Perce" Language ; a Description 
of j Mount Hood; Incidents of Travel, 
&c., &c. | By Joel Palmer. | 

Cincinnati: | J. A. & U. P. James, 
Walnut street, | between Fourth and 
Fifth. | 1851. 

Title verso copyright notice etc. 1 1. dedica 
tion verso blank 1 1. publishers advertisement 
pp. v-vi, index [contents] pp. 7-viii [sic], text 
pp. 9-189, 12. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above. 

Copies seen : Boston Athenaeum. 

Journal of travels | over the | Rocky 

mountains, | to the | mouth of the 
Columbia river ; (made during the years 
1845 and 1846: | containing minute 
descriptions of the | valleys of the 
Willamette, Umpqua, and Clainet; | a 



58 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Palmer (J.) Continued. 

general description of | Oregon terri 
tory; | its inhabitants, climate, soil, 
productions, etc., etc. ; | a list of | 
necessary outfits for emigrants; | and a 
| Table of Distances from Camp to 
Camp on the Eoute. | Also ; | A Letter 
from the Rev. H. H. Spalding, resident 
Missionary, for the last ten years, | 
among the Nez Perce" Tribe of Indians, 
on the Koos-koos-kee River; The | 
Organic Laws of Oregon Territory; 
Tables of about 300 words of the Chin 
ook | Jargon, and about 200 Words of 
the Nez Perce" Language ; a Description 
of | Mount Hood ; Incidents of Travel, 
&c., &c. I By Joel Palmer. J 

Cincinnati : | J. A. & U. P. James, 
Walnut street, | between Fourth and 
Fifth. | 1852. 

Title verso copyright notice etc. 1 1. dedica 
tion verso blank 1 1. publishers advertisement 
pp. v-vi, index [contents] pp. 7-viii [*ic], text 
pp. 9-189, 12. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above. 

Copies seen: Congress. 

Parker (Rev. Samuel). Journal | of an 

| exploring tour | beyond the Rocky 
mountains, | under the direction of the 

| A. B. C. F. M. | Performed in the 
years | 1835, 36, and 37; | containing 

| a description of the geography, geol 
ogy, climate, and | productions; and 
the number, manners, and | customs of 
the natives. | With a | map of Oregon 
territory. | By Rev. Samuel Parker, 
A. M. | 

Ithaca, N. Y. | Published by the 
author. | Mack, Aiidrus, & Woodruff, 
Printers. | 1838. 

, Title verso copyright notice 1 1. preface pp. 
iii-vi, contents pp. vii-xii, text pp. 13-371, map 
and plates, 12. 

Vocabulary (90 words) of the Chinook [Jar 
gon] language as spoken about Fort Vancouver, 
pp. 336-338. Numerals 1-10, 20, 40, 100, p. 338. 

Copies seen : .Boston Athenaeum, Boston Pub 
lic, British Museum, Congress, Eames, Mallet, 
Trumbull. 

Journal | of an | exploring tour | 

beyond the Rocky mountains, | under 
the direction of the | American board of 
commissions [sic] for foreign missions, 

| in the years 1835, 36, and 37 ; | con 
taining | a description of the geog 
raphy, geology, climate, productions | 
of the country, and the number, man 
ners, and | customs of the natives: | 



Parker (S.) Continued, 
with a | map of Oregon territory. | By 
rev. Samuel Parker, A. M. | Second 
edition. | 

Ithaca, N. Y. | Published by the 
author. | Mack, Andrus, & Woodruff, 
printers. | 1840. 

Title verso copyright notice 1 1. recommen 
dations pp. iii-iv, preface pp. v-viii, preface to 
the second edition pp. ix-x, contents pp. xi-xvi, 
text pp. 17-384, appendix pp. 385-399, addenda 
pp. 399-400, map and plate, 12. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above, 
pp. 396-398. 

Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Geological 

The edition: Edinburgh, 1841, 8, does not 
contain the Chinook Jargon material. (Con 
gress.) 

Journal J of an | exploring tour | 

beyond the Rocky mountains, | under 
the direction of the | A. B. C. F. M. | in 
the years 1835, 36, and 37 ; | containing 
| a description of the geography, ge 
ology, climate, produc- | tions of the 
country, and the numbers, manners, | 
and customs of the natives : | with a | 
map of Oregon territory. | By rev. 
Samuel Parker, A.M. | Third edition. | 
Ithaca, N. Y. | Mack, Andrus, & 
Woodruff. | Boston: Crocker & Brew- 
ster. New- York : Dayton & Saxton ; | 
Collins, Keese, & co. Philadelphia: 
Grigg & Elliot. | London: Wiley & 
Putnam. | 1842. 

Title verso copyright notice (1838) and names 
of printers 1 1. recommendations pp. iii-iv, 
preface pp. v-viii, preface to the second and 
third editions pp. ix-x, contents pp. xi-xvi, 
text pp. 17-394, appendix pp. 395-408, map and 
plate, 12. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above, pp. 
405-408. 

Copies seen : Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, 
Eames, Geological Survey, Mallet. 

Journal | of an | exploring tour | 

beyond the Rocky mountains, | under 
the direction of the j A. B. C. F. M. | con 
taining ] a description of the geography, 
geology, climate, pro- | ductions of the 
country, and the numbers, man- | ners, 
and customs of the natives : | with a | 
map of Oregon territory. | By rev. Sam 
uel Parker, A. M. | Fourth edition. | 

Ithaca, N. Y. | Andrus, Woodruff, & 
Gauntlett. | Boston : Crocker & Brew- 
ster. New York : Huntington & Sav 
age; | Robinson, Pratt, & Co. Phila- 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



59 



Parker (S.) Continued. 

delphia : Thomas, Cowper- ! thwait & 
Co. London: Wiley & Putnam. | 1844. 

Pp. i-xvi, 17-416, map, 12. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above, pp. 
413-416. 

Copies seen : One in the library of "W. "W. 
Beach, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Journal j of an | exploring tour | 
beyond the Rocky mountains, | under I 
the direction of the 1 A. B. C. F. M. 1 con 
taining! a description of the geography, 
geology, climate, | productions of the 
country, and the numbers, | manners, 
and customs of the natives : | with a | 
map of Oregon territory. | By rev. Sam 
uel Parker, A. M. j Fifth edition. | 

Auburn : | J. C. Derby & co. ; | New- 
York : Mark H. Newman & co., Gen 
eva: G. H. Derby & co. | Cincinnati: 
Derby, Bradley & co. | 1846. 

Title verso copyright notice etc. 1 1. recom 
mendations pp. iii-iv, preface pp. v-vii, preface 
to the fifth edition p. ix, contents pp. xi-xvi, 
text pp. 17-422. map and plate, 12. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above, 
pp. 419-421. 

Copies seen : Congress, Eames, Georgetown, 
Harvard . 

Samuel Parker, clergyman, born in Ashfield, 
N. H., April 23. 1779; died in Ithaca, N. Y., 
March 24, 1866. He was graduated at Williams 
in 1806 and at Andover Theological Seminary 
in 1810, became a missionary in western New 
York, and subsequently was in charge of Con 
gregational churches in Massachusetts and 
New York. Mr. Parker originated the mission 
of the American board in Oregon, traveled there 
in 1835-1837, subsequently lectured in many 
eastern States on the character of that territory, 
and did much to establish the claims of the 
United States Government to the lands, and to 
induce emigrants to settle there. He is also 
said to have been the first to suggest the possi 
bility of constructing a railroad through the 
Rocky mountains to the Pacific ocean. Apple- 
ton s Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 
Periodical : 

Chinook Jargon See Le Jeune (J. M. R.) 

Pilling: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to is in the possession of the 
compiler of this catalogue. 

Pilling (James Constantine). Smithson 
ian institution Bureau of ethnology | 
J. W. Powell director | Proof-sheets | of 
a | bibliography | of | the languages | 
of the | North American Indians | by | 
James Constantine Pilling | (Distrib 
uted only to collaborators) | 



Pilling (J. C.) Continued. 

Washington | Government printing 
office | 1885 

Title verso blank 1 1. notice signed J. W. 
Powell p. iii, preface pp.v-viii, introduction pp. 
ix-x, list of authorities pp. xi-xxxvi, list of 
libraries referred to by initials pp. xxxvii- 
xxxviii, list of fac-similes pp. xxxix-xl, text 
pp. 1-839, additions and corrections pp. 841-1090, 
index of languages .and dialects pp. 1091-1135, 
plates, 4. 

Arranged alphabetically by name of author, 
translator, or first word of title. One hundred 
and ten copies printed, ten of them on one side 
of the sheet only. 

Pinart (Alphonse L.) [Linguistic mate 
rial relating to the Chinookan fam 
ily.] (*) 

Manuscripts in possession of their author, 
who, some years ago, in response to my request 
for a list of his linguistic material,|wroteme as 
follows : 

" I have collected, during my fifteen years of 
traveling vocabularies, texts, songs, general 
linguistic material, etc., in the following lan 
guages and dialects . . . and some relating 
to the Chinook. It is impossible at present to 
give you the number of pages, etc., as most of 
it is contained in my note-books, and has not 
as yet been put into shape. 

Platzmann ( Julius). Verzeichniss | einer 
Auswahl | amerikanischer | Grarnma- 
tiken, | Worterbiicher, Katechismen | 
u. s. w. | Gesammelt | von | Julius 
Platzmann. | 

Leipzig, 1876. | K. F. Kohler s anti- 
quarium, | Poststrasse 17. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso 
blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. quotation 
from Rouquette verso blank 1 1. text, alphabet 
ically arranged by family names, pp. 1-38, 8. 

List of works in Chinuk, p. 10. 

Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling, 
Trumbull, Wellesley. 

Pott (August Friedrich). Doppelung | 
(Reduplikation, Gemmation) | als | 
eines der wichtigsten Bildungsmittel 
der Sprache, | beleuchtet | aus Sprachen 
aller Welttheile | durch j Aug. Friedr. 
Pott, Dr. | Prof, der Allgemeinen 
Sprachwiss. an der Univ. zu Halle [&c. 
two lines.] | 

Lemgo & Detmold, | im Verlage der 
Meyer schen Hot buchhandlung 1862. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso quo 
tation 1 l.Vorwortpp.iii-iv, Inhaltsverzeichniss 
pp. v-vi, text pp. 1-304, list of books on verso of 
back cover, 8. 

Reduplicate words in Chinook, p. 114; in 
Lower Chinook, pp. 37, 41, 60, 61, 62, 90. 

Copies seen : As tor, British Museum, Earnes. 



60 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Pott (A. F.) Continued. 

Einleitung in die allgeineine Sprach- 

wissenchaft. 

In Internationale Zeitsclirift f iir allgemeine 
Sprachwissenschaft, vol. 1, pp. 1-68, 329-354, vol. 
2, pp. 54-115, 209-251, vol. 3, pp. 110-126, 249-275, 
Supp. pp. 1-193, vol. 4, pp. 07-96, vol. 5, pp. 3- 
18, Leipzig, 1884-1887, andHeilbronn, 1889, large 
8. 

The literature of American linguistics, vol. 4, 
pp. 67-96. This portion was published after Mr. 
Pott s death, which occurred July 5, 1887. The 
general editor of the Zeitsclirift, Mr. Techmer, 
states in a note that Pott s paper is continued 
from the manuscripts which he left, and that it 
is to close with the languages of Australia. In 
the section of American linguistics publica 
tions in all the more important stocks of North 
America are mentioned, with brief characteri 
zation. 

Powell: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler in the library of Major J. W. Powell, 
Washington, 1). C. 

Powell (Maj. John Wesley). Indian lin 
guistic families of America north of 
Mexico. By J. W. Powell. 

In Bureau of Ethnology, seventh annual 
report, pp. 1-142, Washington, 3891, royal 8. 

Chinookan family, with a list of synonyms 
and principal tribes, derivation of the name, 
habitat, etc., pp. 63-65. 

Issued separately with title-page as follows : 

Indian linguistic families of America 

| north of Mexico | by | J. W. Powell 
| Extract from tlie seventh annual 
report of the Bureau of ethnology | 
[Design] | 

Washington | Government printing 
office | 1891 

Cover title as above, no inside title, half-title 
p. 1. contents pp. 3-6, text pp. 7-142, map, royal 
8. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 

Copies seen : Bureau of Ethnology, Eames, 
Pilling, Powell. 

Practical Chinook [Jargon] vocabulary. 
See lie Jeune (J. M. K.) 

Prayers : 

Cathlascon See Lee (I).) and Frost (J. IT.) 
Chinook Blanchet (F.N.) 

Chinook Jargon Buhner (T. S.) 
Chinook Jargon Deraers (M.) et al. 

Priest (Josi an). American antiquities, | 
and | discoveries in the west: | being | 
an exhibition of the evidence | that an 
ancient population of partially civilized 
nations,) differing entirely from those of 



Priest (J.) Continued, 
the present In- 1 diaus, peopled America, 
many centuries before j its discovery by 
Columbus. | And | inquiries into their 
origin, | with a | copious description | 
Of many of their stupendous Works, 
now in ruins. | With | conjectures of 
what may have | become of them. | Com 
piled | from travels, authentic sources, 
and the researches | of | Antiquarian 
Societies. | By Josiah Priest. | 

Albany: [ printed by Hoffman and 
White, No. 71, State-Street. | 1833. 

Folded frontispiece, title verso copyright 
notice 1 1. preface pp. iii-iv, contents pp. v-viii, 
text pp. 9-400, map and plates, 8. 

Rafinesque (C, S.), Languages of Oregon 
Chopunish and Chinuc, pp. 395-397. 

Copies seen : Harvard. 

American antiquities, | and | dis 
coveries in the west: | being | an exhi 
bition of the evidence | that an ancient 
population of partially civilized na 
tions, | differing entirely from those of 
the present In- 1 dians, peopled America, 
many centuries before | its discovery by 
Columbus. | And | inquiries into their 
origin, with a | copious description | Of 
many of their stupendous Works, now 
in ruins. ] With | conjectures concerning 
what may have | become of them. | Com 
piled | from travels, authentic sources, 
and the researches | of | Antiquarian 
Societies. | By Josiah Priest. | Third 
Edition Revised. | 

Albany : | printed by Hoffman and 
White, | No. 71, State-Street. | 1833. 

Folded frontispiece, title verso copyright 
notice 1 1. preface pp. iii-iv, contents pp. v-viii, 
text pp. 9-400, map and plate, 8. 

Rafinesque (C. S.), Tabular view of the 
American generic; languages, pp. 309-312. 

Languages of Oregon Chopunish and 
Chinuc, pp. 395-397. 

Copies seen: Boston Public, Congress, Eames, 
Harvard, Massachusetts Historical Society. 

The Brinley copy, no. 5435. sold for $1.50. 

These articles are omitted in the later editions 
of Priest s work. 



Primer: 




Chinook Jargon 


See Le Jeune (J. M. R.) 


Proper names : 
Chinook 
Chinook 

Clakama 


See Catlin (G.) 
Stanley (J. M.) 
Stanley (J. M.) 



[Prosch (Thomas W.)] The complete 
| Chinook Jargon j or j Indian trade 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



61 



Prosch (T. W.) Continued. 

language | of | Oregon, Washington, 
British Co- | lumbia, Alaska, Idaho | 
And other ports of the North Pacific | 
Coast. | The host yet issued. | 

G. Davies & co., | publishers. | 709 
Front street, Seattle, | 1888. 

Cover title : Dictionary | of the ! Chinook, | the 
| Indian trade language | of | Oregon, Washing 
ton, Idaho, | British Columbia and | Alaska. | 
Chinook-English and English-Chinook. | 



Prosch (T. W.) Continued. 

1888. | (>. Davies & co., | publishers, | Seattle, 
W. T. | Copyright 1888 by G. Davies. 

Cover title, title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. 
:-5, toxt pp. 7-40, 18. 

Chinook- English, alphabetically arranged, 
pp. 7-21). English-Chinook, double columns, 
alphabetically arranged, pp. 27-38. Conversa 
tion in Chinook, free translation, pp. 39-40. 
Lord s prayer with interlinear English trans 
lation, p. 40. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 



Q. 



Quaritch: This word following a title or within i 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy I 
of the work referred to has been seen by the | 
compiler in the bookstore of Bernard Quaritch, 
London, Eng. 

Quaritch (Bernard). Catalogue | of 
books on the | history, geography, | 
and of | the philology | of | America, 
Australasia, Asia, Africa. | I. Historical 
geography, voyages, and | travels. | II. 
History, ethnology, and philology | of 
America. | III. History, topography, 
and ethnology | of Asia, Polynesia, and 
Africa. | Offered for Cash at the affixed 
net prices by | Bernard Quaritch. | 

London: | 15 Piccadilly, June 1885 to 
October 1886. | 1886. 

Title verso contents 1 1. catalogue pp. 2747- 
3162, index pp. i-lxii, 8. Lettered on the back : 
QUARITCH S | GENERAL | CATALOGUE | PART xu. 

| VOYAGES | AND | TRAVELS | AMERICANA | AND | 

ORIENTALIA | LONDON 1886. This volume com 
prises nos. 362-364 (June,. July, and August, 1885) 
of the paper-covered series, with the addition of 
a special title and a general index. 

American languages, pp. 3021-3042, contains 
two titles of books under the heading Chinook, 
p. 3026. 

The complete "General Catalogue," of which 
the above is a portion, comprises 15 parts, each 
bound in red cloth, paged consecutively 1-4066, 
and a sixteenth part containing a general index 
of 427 pages in treble columns. Each volume 
has its owu special title and index, with the 



Quaritch (B.) Continued. 

title of the series and the number of the part 
lettered on the back. Excepting the index, it 
was originally issued as nos. 332-375 of the 
paper-covered series, from November, 1880, to 
August, 1887, at which date the publication 
was discontinued. The index is dated 1892. 

Copies seen : Eanies. 

A large-paper edition with title as follows: 

A general j catalogue of books | offered 

to the public at the affixed prices | by 
| Bernard Quaritch | Vol. I[-VII] | 

London : 1 15 Piccadilly, 1 1887[-1892]. 

7 vols. royal 8. 

American languages, as under the preceding 
title, vol. 5, pp. 3021-3042. 

Copies seen: Lenox. 

This edition was published at 151. for the set, 
including the seventh or index volume. 

No. 86. London, December, 1887. | A 
rough list | of | valuable and rare books, 
| comprising | the choicest portions of 
Various Libraries, and many very cheap 
works of every class of Literature, | at 
greatly reduced prices, | offered by | 
Bernard Quaritch, 15, Piccadilly, W. 

Cover title: "The miscellaneous and the 
musical library of Mr. William Chappell," etc., 
catalogue with heading as above, pp. 1-128. 8. 

American languages, pp. 1-13, contains titles 
of a few works giving information relating to 
the- Chinook Jargon, p. 7. 

Copies seen : Eames, Pilling. 



62 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Rafinesque (Constantme Samuel). At 
lantic journal, | and | friend of knowl 
edge. | In eight numbers. | Containing 
about 160 original articles and tracts on 
Natural and | Historical Sciences, the 
Description of about 150 New Plants, | 
and 100 New Animals or Fossils. Many 
Vocabularies of Langua- | ges, Histor 
ical and Geological Facts, &c. &c. &c. 
| By C. S. Rafinesque, A. M. . . Ph. D. 
| Professor of Historical and Natural 
Sciences, Member of seve- | ral learned 
societies in Europe and America, &c. | 
[Quotation and list of figures, six 
lines.] | 

Philadelphia: | 1832-1833. | (Two 
dollars.) 

Tabular view recto blank 1 1. title verso in 
dex 1 1. iconography and illustrations etc. 1 1. 
text pp. 1-202, 205-212, 8. Originally issued in 
numbers (1-8, and extra of no. 3), from the 
"spring of 1832 " to the "winter of 1833." 

American history. Tabular View of the Amer 
ican Generic Languages, and Original Nations, 
including the Chinuc, pp. 6-8. 

Languages of Oregon, Chopunish acd Chinuc 
(pp. 133-134) contains a vocabulary, English 
and Chinuc, thirty-three words (including 
numerals 1-10). from Cox, Lewis, and other 
sources, p. 134. 

Copies seen : Boston Athenaeum, British Mu 
seum, Congress, Eames. 

These two articles reprinted in : 

Priest (J.), American antiquities, pp. 309-312, 
395-397, Albany, 1833, 8. 

Constantino Samuel Rafinesque, botanist, 
born in Galatz, a suburb of Constantinople, 
Turkey, in 1784, died in Philadelphia, Pa., Sep 
tember 18, 1842. He was of French parentage, 
and his father, a merchant, died in Philadelphia 
about 1791. The son came to Philadelphia with 
his brother in 1802, and, after traveling through 
Pennsylvania and Delaware, returned with a 
collection of botanical specimens in 1805 and 
went to Sicily, where he spent ten years as a 
merchant and in the study of botany. In 1815 
he sailed for New York, but was shipwrecked 
on the Long Island coast, and lost his valuable 
books, collections, manuscripts, and drawings. 
In 1818 he went to the west and became pro 
fessor of botany in Transylvania University, 
Lexington, Ky. Subsequently he traveled and 
lectured in various places, endeavored to estab 
lish a magazine and botanic garden, but with 
out success, and finally settled in Philadelphia, 
where he resided until his death, and where he 
published The Atlantic Journal and Friend of 
Knowledge; a Cyclopaedic Journal and Review, 
of wh ich only eight numbera appeared (1 832- 33) . 
The number of genera and speciett that he 



Rafinesque (C. S.) Continued. 

introduced into his works produced great con 
fusion. A gradual deterioration is found in 
Rafinesque s botanical writings from 1819 till 
1830, when the passion for establishing new 
genera and species seems to have become a 
monomania with him. He assumed thirty to 
one hundred years as the average time required 
for the production of a new species and five 
hundred to a thousand years for a new genus. 
It is said that he wrote a paper describing 
"twelve new species of thunder and lightning." 
In addition to translations and unfinished botan 
ical and zoological works, he was the author of 
numerous books and pamphlets. Appleton s 
Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

[Reade (John).] Chinook versus Greek. 
In Montreal Gazette, vol. 119, no. 239, p. 4, 
Montreal, October 6, 1890. (Pilling.) 

A review of Hale (H.), An international 
idiom. 

Contains a general discussion of the Chinook 
Jargon, with a number of examples. 
Reviews: 

Chinook Jargon See Charencey (C. de.) 

Chinook Jargon Crane (A.) 

Chinook Jargon Leland (C. G.) 

Chinook Jargon Reade (J.) 

Chinook Jargon "Western. 

Richardson (Albert Deaue). Beyond the 
Mississippi: | from the great river to 
the great ocean. | Life and adventure 
| on the | prairies, mountains, and 
Pacific coast. | With more than two 
hundred illustrations, from photo 
graphs and original | sketches, of the 
prairies, deserts, mountains, rivers, 
mines, | cities, Indians, trappers, pion 
eers, and great natural | curiosities of 
the new states and territories. | 1857- 
1867. | By | Albert D. Richardson, | 
author of Field, dungeon and escape. 
| [Two lines advertisement.] | 

Hartford, Conn., | American pub 
lishing company, j National publishing 
company, | Philadelphia, Pa., Cincin 
nati, O., Chicago, 111., St. Louis, Mo., ( 
New Orleans, La., Atlanta, Ga., Rich-, 
inond, Ya. | Bliss & company, New 
York. | 1867. 

Engraved title : Beyond | the | Mississippi ( 
Albert D. Richardson. 

Map, engraved title verso blank, title versa 
copyright notice 1 1. extracts from Whittier and 
Longfellow verso blank 1 1. prefatory pp. i-ii, 
illustrations pp. iii-vii, con tents pp. ix-xvi, text 
pp. 17-572, 8. 

Short vocabulary (20 words, alphabetically 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



63 



Richardson (A. D.) Continued. 

arranged by English words) of the Chinook 
Jargon, and the numerals 1-10, 20, 30, 100, 1000 
in the same, pp. 502-503. 

Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athenaeum, Brit 
ish Museum, Congress, Trumbull. 

Some copies vary slightly in the imprint, 
and omit the date. (Eames, Harvard.) Another 
edition: Hartford, 1869, 8. (*) 

A later edition with title-page as follows : 

Beyond the Mississippi : | from the 

great river to the great ocean. | Life 
and adventure | on the | prairies, moun 
tains, and Pacific coast, j With more 
than two hundred illustrations, from 
photographs and original | sketches, 
of the prairies, deserts, mountains, 
rivers, mines, | cities, Indians, trap 
pers, pioneers, and great natural | 
curiosities of the new states and terri 
tories. | New edition. | Written down 
to summer of 1869. | By | Albert D. 
Eichardson, | author of l Field, dun 
geon and escape/ and Personal | his 
tory of Ulysses S. Grant. | [Two lines 
advertisement.] | 

Hartford: | American publishing 
company, | 1875. 

2 p. 11. pp. i-xvi, 17-572, 8. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 

Copies seen : Trumbull. 

Albert Deane Richardson, journalist, born 
in Franklin, Mass., October 6, 1833, died in 
New York city December 2, 1869. He was edu 
cated at the district school of his native village 
and at Holliston academy. At eighteen years 
of age he went to Pittsburg, Pa., where he 
formed a newspaper connection, wrote a farce 
for Barney Williams, and appeared a few times 
on the stage. In 1857 he went to Kansas, 
taking an active part in the political struggle 
of the territory, attending antislavery meet 
ings, makingspeeches, and corresponding about 
the issues of the hour with the Boston Journal. 
He was also secretary of the territorial legisla 
ture. Two years later he went to Pike s Peak, 
the gold fever being then at its height, in com 
pany with Horace Greeley, between whom and 
Eichardson a lasting friendship was formed. In 
the autumn of 1859 he made a journey through 
the southwestern territories, and sent accounts 
of his wanderings to eastern journals. During 
the winter that preceded the civil war he vol 
unteered to go through the south as secret cor 
respondent of the Tribune, and returned, after 
many narrow escapes, just before the firing on 
Sumter. He next entered the field as war cor 
respondent, and for two years alternated 
between Virginia and the southwest, being 
present at many battles. On the night of May 
3, 1863, he undertook, in company with Junius 
Henri Browne, a fellow correspondent of the 



Richardson (A. D.) Continued. 

T ribune, and Richard T. Colburn, of the New 
York World, to run the batteries of Vicksburg 
on two barges, which were lashed to a steam 
tug. After they had been under fire for more 
than half an hour, a large shell struck the tug, 
and, bursting in the furnace, threw the coals on 
the barges and then set them on fire. Out of 
34 men, 18 were killed or wounded and 16 were 
captured, the correspondents among them. The 
Confederate government would neither release 
nor exchange the Tribune men, who, after 
spending eighteen months in seven southern 
prisons, escaped from Salisbury, N. C., in the 
dead of winter, and, walking 400 miles, arrived 
within the national lines at Strawberry Plains, 
Tenn., several months before the close of the 
war. Appleton s Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

Ross (Alexander). Adventures | of the 
first settlers on the | Oregon or Colum 
bia river : | being | a narrative of the 
expedition fitted out by | John Jacob 
Astor, | to establish the | " Pacific fur 
company;" | with an account of some 
| Indian tribes on the coast of the 
Pacific. | By Alexander Ross, | one of 
the adventurers. | 

London: | Smith, Elder and co., 65 
Cornhill. | 1849. 

Title verso name of printer 1 1. preface pp. 
iii-v, contents pp. vi-xv, errata p. [xvi], text pp. 
1-352, 12. 

Vocabulary of the Chinook (200 words) and 
numerals (1-5000), pp. 342-348. Vocabulary of 
the Chinook Jargon (30 words), p. 349. 

Copies seen : Astor, Bancroft, Boston 
Athenaeum, British Museum, Bureau of Eth 
nology, Congress, Trumbull. 

Alexander Ross, author, born in Nairnshire, 
Scotland, May 9, 1783, died in Colony Gardens 
(now in Winnipeg, Manitoba), Red River Set 
tlement, British North America, October 23, 
1856. He came to Canada in 1805, taught in 
Glengarry, U. C., and in 1810 joined John Jacob 
Astor s expedition to Oregon. Until 1824 he 
was a fur-trader and in the service of the Hud 
son Bay Company. About 1825 he removed to 
the Red River settlement and was a member 
of the council of Assineboia, and was sheriff 
of the Red River settlement for several years. 
He was for fifteen years a resident in the territo 
ries of the Hudson Bay Company, and has given 
the result of his observations in the works: 
Adventures of the First Settlers on the Oregon 
or Columbia River ; being a Narrative of the 
Expedition fitting out by John Jacob Astor to 
establish the Pacific Fur Company, with an 
Account of some Indian Tribes on the Coast of 
the Pacific (London, 1849) ; The Fur-Hunters of 
the Far West, a Narrative of Adventures in 
the Oregon and Rocky Mountains (2 vols. 1855) . 
and The Red River Settlement (1856) .A.pple 
ton s Cyclop, of Atn. Bioy . 



64 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



s. 



Sabin (Joseph). A j dictionary | of | 
Books relating to America, | from its 
discovery to the present time. | By 
Joseph Sabin. | Volume I[-XX]. | 
[Three lines quotation.] | 

New-York : | Joseph Sabin, 84 Nassau 
street. | 1868 [-1892]. 

20 vols. 8 C . Still in course of publication. 
Parts cxv-cxvi, which begin vol. 20, reach the 
article "Smith." Now edited by Mr. Wilber- 
force Eames. 

Contains, passim, titles of books in and 
relating to the Chinookau languages. 

Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Geological 
Survey, Lenox. 

- See Field (T.W.) 

[St. Onge (Rev. Louis Napoleon).] His 
tory of the old testament. | Age I. | 
From Adam to Abraham. | Containing 
2083 Years. 

[Kamloops, B. C. : 1892.] 

No title-page, heading only; text in the 
Chinook Jargon, stenographic characters, with 
English headings in italics, pp. 1-24, 16. 

Forms a supplement to Le Jeune (J. M. II.), 
Kamloops Wawa, vol. 2, nos. 1-6 (nos. 33-38 of 
the series), July 3- August 7, 1892. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 

{- | Bible history | translated | into 
the Chinook Jargon by | the Rev. L. N. 
Saint Onge Missionary | among the 
Yakamas and other Indian tribes of 
the Territo- | ries of Washington, 
Idaho, Montana, and of | Oregon. | A. 
M. D. G. | 1892. 

Manuscript ; title verso blank 1 1. preface 13 
leaves, written on one side only, text (in the 
Jargon with interlinear English translation, 
written on both sides) 11. 1-142, 4. In possession 
of Dr. T. S. Bulmer, Cedar City, Utah, who 
intends incorporating it in one of his publica 
tions on the Chinook Jargon. Father St. Onge 
informs me that he intends publishing this 
paper separately also, under the title of 
Chinook Jargon translation of the Epitome 
Historic Sacrse." 

Chinook Jargon Dictionary | by | L. 
N. Saintonge, Ptre. | English-Chinook 
Jargon. | Part first. | 

Troy, N. Y., U. S. A. : | 1892. | A. M. 
D.G. 

Manuscript ; title verso note 1 1. text (alpha 
betically arranged by English words) pp. 1-184, 
8. Recorded in a blank book bound in leather. 
In possession of its author. 

Chinook Wawa [writing], pp. 1-181. Sounds 
of the letters used, pp. 1X2-184. 



St. Onge (L.N.) Continued. 

The dictionary contains probably 6, 000 words. 

Concerning the second part of this work, 
Father Saintonge writes me, under date of 
January 24, 1893, as follows : 

" I am not now working at my dictionary 
(second part) because I am not well enough, but 
I intend to finish, it as soon as I can. lean not 
have it published now because I have not the 
means for that purpose. You may say it is 
intended for publication some time in the 
future. The second part will not be so volu 
minous as the first; the list of words will not 
be so great, but the definitions will take greater 
space, as I shall give the etymology and source 
from which each Jargon word comes." 

Hymns in the Chinook Jargon. 

In Bulmer (T. S.), Hymns, songs, &c., in 
Chinook Jargon (manuscript), 11. 34-45. 

[Legends in the Chinook Jargon.] 
In Bulmer (T. S.), Appendix to Buhner s 

Chinook J argon grammar and dictionary (man 
uscript) 11. 26-57, 4. 

Accompanied by an interlinear translation in 
English. 

See Bulmer (T. S.) 

- See Demers (M.), Blanchet (F.N.) 
and St. Onge (L.N.) 

" The subject of this sketch, the Rev. Louis 
K St. Onge, of St. Alphonse de Liguori parish, 
was born [in the village of St. Cesaire] a few 
miles south of Montreal, Canada, April 14, 1812. 
He finished his classical course when yet very 
young, after which he studied law for two 
years. Feeling called to another field, he gave 
up this career in order to prepare himself to 
work for God s glory as an Indian missionary 
in the diocese of Nesqually, Washington Terri 
tory. 

"A year and a half before his ordination, 
Right Rev. A. M. Blanchet, his bishop, ordered 
him to Vancouver, W. T., where ho was occu 
pied as a professor of natural philosophy, 
astronomy, and other branches in the Holy 
Angel s College. All his spare time was conse 
crated to the study of the Indian languages, in 
which he is to-day one of the most expert, so 
that he was ready to go on active missionary 
work as soon as ordained. 

" The first years of his missionary life were 
occupied in visiting different tribes of Indians 
and doing other missionary work in the Terri 
tories of Washington, Idaho, Montana, and 
other Rocky Mountain districts, among Indians 
and miners. After such labors he was then 
appointed to take charge of the Yakamas, 
Klikitats, Winatchas, Wishrams, Pshwanwa- 
pams, Narchez, and other Indian tribes inhab 
iting the central part of Washington Territory. 
Having no means of support in his new mia- 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



65 



St. Onge (L. N.) Continued. 

sion, Bishop Blanchet, in his self-sacrificing 
charity for the Indians of his extensive diocese, 
furnished him with the necessary outfit ; and 
with a numher of willing though unskilled 
Indians as apprentice carpenters, the young 
missionary set to work to rebuild the St. 
Joseph s mission, destroyed in 1856 by a party 
of vandals called the Oregon Volunteers, who 
had been sent to fight the Yakamas. 

"After four years of labor, he and his 
devoted companion, Mr. J. B. Boulet (now 
ordained and stationed among the Tulalip In 
dians) had the satisfaction to see not only a 
comfortable residence, but also a neat church, 
erected, and a fine tract of land planted with 
fruit trees, and in a profitable state of cultiva 
tion, where formerly only ruin and desolation 
reigned. 

"His health breaking down entirely, he was 
forced to leave his present and daily increasing 
congregation of neophites. Wishing to give him 
the best medical treatment, Bishop Blanchet 
sent Father St. Onge to his native land with a 
leave of absence until his health would be 
restored. During his eighteen months stay in 
a hospital he, however, utilized his time by 
composing and printing two small Indian 
books, containing rules of grammar, catechism, 
hymns, and Christian prayers in Yakama and 
Chinook languages the former for children, 
the latter for the use of missionaries on the 
Pacific coast. 

"By the advice of his physician he then 
undertook a voyage to Europe, where he spent 
nearly a year in search of health. Back again 
to this country, he had charge of a congregation 
for a couple of years in Vermont; and now he 
is the pastor of the two French churches of 
Glens Falls and Sandy Hill, in the diocese of 
Albany, New York. 

" Father St. Onge, though a man of uncom 
mon physical appearance, stoutly built and six 
feet and four inches in height, has not yet 
entirely recovered his health and strength. The 
French population of Glens Falls have good 
cause for feeling very much gratified with the 
present condition of the affairs of the parish of 
St. Alphonse de Liguori, and should receive the 
hearty congratulations of the entire commu 
nity. Father St. Onge, a man of great erudition, 
a devoted servant to the church, and possessing 
a personality whose geniality and courtesy 
have won him a place in the hearts of his peo 
ple, has by his faithful application to his 
parish developed it and brought out all that j 
was to inure to its benefit arid further advance 
its interests." Glens Falls (N. Y.) Republican, 
March 28, 1889. 

Father St. Onge remained at Glens Falls until 
October, 1891, when increasing infirmities com 
pelled him to retire permanently from the min 
istry. He is now living with his brother, the 
rector of St. Jean Baptiste church, in Troy. N. 
Y. Since his retirement he has compiled an 
English-Chinook Jargon dictionary of about 
CHIN 5 



St. Onge (L. N.) Continued. 

six thousand words, and this he intends to 
.supplement with a corresponding Jargon-Eng 
lish part. He has also begun the preparation 
of a Yakama dictionary, which he hopes to 
make much more complete than that of Father 
Pandosy, published in Dr. Shea s Library of 
American linguistics. 

I have adopted the spelling of his name as it 
appears on the title-page of Bishop Detners s 
Chinook Jargon dictionary, though the true 
spelling, and the one he uses now, is Saint- 
onge that of a French province in which his 
ancestors lived and from which four or five 
families came in 1696, all adopting the name. 
His family name ivS Payant. 

Sayce (Archibald Henry). Introduction 
to the | science of language. | By | A. 
H. Sayce, | deputy professor of compar 
ative philology in the university of 
Oxford. | In two volumes. | Vol. I [-II]. 
| [Design.] | 

London: | C. Kegan Paul & co., 1, 
Paternoster square. | 1880. 

2vols.: half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso 
quotation and notice 1 1. preface pp.v-viii, table 
of contents verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-441, colo 
phon verso blank 1 1. ; half-title verso blank 1 1. 
title verso quotation and notice 1 1. table of con 
tents verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-352, selected list 
of works pp. 353-363, index pp. 365-421, 12. 

A classification of American languages (vol. 
2, pp. 57-64) includes the Chinook, p. 60. 

Copies seen : Bureau of Ethnology, Eaines. 

Schoolcraft (Henry Rowe). Historical | 

and | statistical information, | respect 
ing the | history, condition and pros 
pects | of the | Indian tribes of the 
United States : | collected and prepared 
under the direction | of the | bureau 
of Indian aifairs, | per act of Congress 
of March 3d, 1847, 1 by Henry R. School- 
craft, LL.D. I Illustrated by S. Eastman, 
capt, U. S. A. | Published by Authority 
of Congress, j Part I [-VI]. | 

Philadelphia : | Lippincott,Grambo & 
company, | (successors to Grigg, Elliot 
&co.) | 1851 [-1857]. 

Engraved title : [Engraving.] | Historical | 
and | statistical information | respecting the | 
history, condition and prospects j of the j Indian 
tribes of the United States : | Collected and pre 
pared under the | direction of the bureau of 
Indian affairs, per act of Congress [ of March 
3 rd 1847 | by Henry R. Schoolcraft L.L.D. | Illus> 
trated by | S. Eastman, capt. U. S. army. | [Coat 
of arms.] | Published by authority of Con 
gress. | Parti [-VI]. | 

Philadelphia: | Lippincott, Grambo & co. 

6 vols. 4. Beginning with vol. 2 the words 
"Historical and statistical" are left off the 



66 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Schoolcraft (II. R.) Continued. 

title-pages, both engraved and printed. Subse 
quently (1853) vol. 1 was also issued with the 
abridged title beginning "Information respect 
ing the history, condition, and prospects of the 
Indian tribes," making it uniform with the 
other parts. 

Two editions with these title-pages were pub 
lished by the same house, one on thinner and 
somewhat smaller paper, of which but A r ols 1-5 
were issued. 

Part I, 1851. Half-title (Ethnological re 
searches, ] respecting j the red man of America) 
verso blank 1 1. engraved title as above verso 
blank 1 1. printed title as above verso blank 1 1. 
introductory documents pp. iii-vi, preface pp. 
vii-x, list of plates pp. xi-xii, contents pp. xiii- 
xviii, text pp. 13-524, appendix pp. 525-508, 
plates, colored lithographs and maps numbered 
1-76. 

Part II, 1852. Half-title (as in part I) verso 
blank 1 1. engraved title (Information respecting 
the history, condition and prospects, etc.) verso 
blank 1 1. printed title (Information respecting 
the history, condition and prospects, etc.) verso 
printers 11. dedication verso blankl 1. introduc 
tory document pp.vii-xiv, contents pp. xv-xxii, j 
list of plates pp. xxiii-xxiv, text pp. 17-608, i 
plates and maps numbered 1-29, 31-78, and 2 
plates exhibiting the Cherokee alphabet and its | 
application. 

Part in, 1853. Half-title (as in part I) verso 
blank 1 1. engraved title (as in part n) verso blank 
1 1. printed title (as in part n) verso printer 1 1. 
third report pp. v-viii, list of divisions p. ix, 
contents xi-xv, list of plates pp. xvii- xviii, 
text pp. 19-635, plates and maps numbered 
1-21, 25-45. 

Part IV, 1854. Half-title (as in part i) verso 
blank 11. engraved title (as in partn) verso blank 
1 1. printed title (as in part II) verso blank 1 1. 
dedication pp. v-vi, fourth report pp. vii-x, list 
of divisions p. xi, contents pp. xiii-xxiii, list of 
plates pp. xxv-xxvi, text pp. 19-668, plates and i 
maps numbered 1-42. 

Part v, 1855. Half-title (as in part I) verso 
blank 11. engraved title (as in part n) verso blank 
1 1. printed title (as in part n) verso blank 1 1. 
dedication pp. vii-viii, fifth report pp. ix-xii, list 
of divisions p, xiii, synopsis of general contents 
of vols. I-V pp. xv-xvi, contents pp. xvii-xxii, 
list of plates pp. xxiii-xxiv, text pp. 25-625, ap 
pendix pp. 627-712, plates and maps numbered 
1-8, 10-36. 

Part VI, 1857. Half-title (General history | of 
the j North American Indians) verso blank 1 1. 
portrait 1 1. printed title (History | of the| Indian 
tribes of the United States: | their | present 
condition and prospects, | and a sketch of their 
| ancient status. | Published by order of con 
gress, hinder the direction of the department of 
the interior Indian bureau. !By | Henry Rowe 
Schoolcraft, LL. D. I Member [&c. six lines.] | 
"With Illustrations by Eminent Artists. | In one 
volume. | Part vi of the series. | Philadelphia: 
| J, B. LippincoU & co. J 1857.) verao blank 1 1, 



Schoolcraft (H. R.) Continued. 

inscription verso blank 1 1. letter to the presi 
dent pp. vii-viii, report pp. ix-x, preface pp. xi- 
xvi, contents pp. xvii-xxvi, list of plates pp. 
xxvii-xxviii. text pp. 25-744, index pp. 745-756, 
fifty-seven plates, partly selected from the other 
volumes, and three tables. 

Vocabulary of the Chinook Jargon (340 words 
alphabetically arranged by English words) 
A T ol. 5, pp. 548-551. 

Emmons (Gr. F.), Replies to inquiries respect 
ing the Indian tribes of Oregon and California, 
vol. 3, pp. 200-225. 

G-allatin (A.), Table of generic Indian fami 
lies of speech, vol. 3, pp. 397-402. 

Copies seen : Astor, Bancroft, Boston Athe- 
naaum, British Museum, Congress, Eames, 
National Museum, Powell, Shea, Trumbull. 

At the Fischer sale, no. 1581, Quaritch bought 
a copy for 4Z. 10*. The Field copy, no. 2075, sold 
for $72 ; the Menzies copy, no. 1765, lbr$132 ; the 
Squier copies, no. 1214, $120 ; no. 2032, $60 ; the 
Ramirez copy, no. 773 (5 vols.), 51. 5s. ; thePinart 
copy, no. 828 (5 vols. in 4), 208 fr. ; the Murphy 
copy, no. 2228, $69. Priced by Quaritch, no. 30017, 
Wl. 10s. ; by Clarke & co. 1886, $65 ; by Quaritch, 
in 1888, 151. 

Reissued with title-pages as follows : 

Archives | of ( Aboriginal Knowledge. 
| Containing all the | Original Papers 
laid before Congress | respecting the | 
History, Antiquities, Language, Eth 
nology, Pictography, | Rites, Supersti 
tions, and Mythology, | of the | Indian 
Tribes of the United States | by | Henry 
R. Schoolcraft, LL. D. | With Illustra 
tions. | Onamdun ih ieu muzzinyeguii 
nn. Algonquin. | In six volumes. | 
Volume I [-VI]. | 

Philadelphia : | J. B. Lippincott & 
Co. | 1860. 

Engraved title : Information | respecting the 
| History, Condition and Prospects | of the | 
Indian Tribes of the United States : | Collected 
and prepared under the | Bureau of Indian 
Aifairs | By Henry R. Schoolcraft L. L. D. | 
Mem : Royal Geo. Society, London. Royal An 
tiquarian Society. Copenhagen. Ethnological 
Society. Paris, &c. &c. | Illustrated by | Cap. 1 
S. Eastman, TJ. S.A. and other eminent artists. | 
[Vignette.] | Published by authority of Con 
gress. | 

Philadelphia : | J. B. Lippincott & Co. 

6 vols. maps and plates, 4. 

This edition agrees in the text page for page 
with the original titled above, and contains in 
addition an index to each volume. 

Copies seen : Congress. 

Partially reprinted with title as follows: 

[ ] The | Indian tribes | of the | United 

States : | their I history, antiquities, cus 
toms, religion, arts, language, | tradi- 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



67 



Schoolcraft (H. R.) C ontinued. 
tions, oral legends, and my ths. | Edited 
by | Francis S.Drake. | Illustrated with 
one hundred fine engravings on steel. 
| In two volumes. | Vol. ![-!!]. | 

Philadelphia : | J. B. Lippincott & 
co. | London: 16 Southampton street, 
Covent Garden. | 1884. 

2 vols.: portrait 1 1. title verso copyright 
notice 1 1. preface pp. 3-5, contents pp. 7-8, list 
of plates pp. 9-10, introduction pp. 11-24, text 
pp. 25-458; frontispiece 1 1. title verso copy 
right notice 1 1. contents pp. 3-G, list of plates 
p. 7, text pp. 9-445, index pp. 447-455, plates, 4. 

"In the following pages the attempt has been 
made to place before the public in a convenient 
and accessible form the results of the life- long 
labors in the lield of aboriginal research of the 
late Henry R. Schoolcraft." 

Chapter n, Language, literature, and pic 
tography, vol. 1, pp. 47-63, contains general 
remarks on the Indian languages. 

Copies seen: Congress. 

Priced by Clarke & co. 1886, no. 6376, $25. 

Henry Howe Schoolcraft, ethnologist, born in 
[Watervliet] Albany county, N. Y., March 28, 
1793, died in Washington, D. C., December 10, 
1864. Was educated at Middlebury college, 
Vermont, and at Union, where he pursued the 
studies of chemistry and mineralogy. Inl817- 18 
he traveled in Missouri and Arkansas, and 
returned with a large collection of geological 
and mineralogical specimens. In 1820 he was 
appointed geologist to Gen. Lewis Cass s explor 
ing expedition to Lake Superior and the head 
waters of Mississippi River. He was secre 
tary of a commission to treat with the Indians 
at Chicago, and, after a journey through Illi 
nois and along Wabash and Miami rivers, was 
in 1822 appointed Indian agent for the tribes 
of the lake region, establishing himself at 
Sault Sainte Marie, and afterward at Mack 
inaw, where, in 1823, he married Jane Johnston, 
granddaughter of Waboojeeg, a noted Ojibway 
chief, who received her education in Europe. In 
1828 he founded the Michigan historical society 
and in 1831 the Algic society. From 1828 till 
1832 he was a member of the territorial legisla 
ture of Michigan. In 1832 he led a government 
expedition, which followed the Mississippi 
River up to its source in Itasca Lake. In 1836 
he negotiated a treaty with the Indians on the 
upper lakes for the cession to the United States 
of 16,000,000 acres of their lands. He was then 
appointed acting superintendent of Indian 
affairs, and in 1839 chief disbursing agent for 
the northern department. On his return from 
Europe in 1842 he made a tour through western 
Virginia, Ohio, and Canada. He was appointed 
by the New York legislature in 1845 a commis 
sioner to take the census of the Indians in the 
state and collect information concerning the 
Six Nations. After the performance of this 
task, Coucress authorized him, on March 3, 1847, 
to obtain through the Indian bureau reports 



Schoolcraft (H. K.) Continued. 

relating to all the Indian tribes of the country, 
and to collate and edit the information. In this 
work he spent the remaining years of his life. 
Through his influence many laws were enacted 
for the protection and benefit of the Indians. 
Numerous scientific societies in the United 
States and Europe elected him to membership, 
and the University of Geneva gave him the 
degree of LL.D. in 1846. He was the author of 
numerous poems, lectures, and reports on 
Indian subjects, besides thirty-one larger 
works. Two of his lectures before the Algic 
society at Detroit on the Grammatical Con 
struction of the Indian Languages were trans 
lated into French by Peter S. Duponceau, and 
gained for their author a gold modal from the 
French institute. . . . To the five volumes 
of Indian researches compiled under the direc 
tion of the war department he added a sixth, 
containing the post-Columbian history of the 
Indians and of their relations with Europeans 
( Philadelphia, 1857) . He had collected material . 
for two additional volumes, but the Govern 
ment suddenly suspended the publication of 
the work. Applcton s Cyclop. ofAm.Biog. 

Scouler (Dr. John). Observations on the 
indigenous tribes of the N. W. coast of 
America. By John Scouler, M. D., F. 
L. S., &c. 

In Royal Geog. Soc. of London, Jour. vol. 11, 
pp. 215-251, London, 1841, 8. (Congress.) 

Includes vocabularies of a number of the 
languages of the region named, among them 
the Chinook (entrance to Columbia River) and 
Cathlascou (banks of the Columbia), pp. 242- 
247. Furnished the author by Dr. W. F. Tolmie. 

Extracts from these vocabularies appear in 
G-ibbs (G.), Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon. 

On the Indian Tribes inhabiting the 

Norlh-West Coast of America. By John 
Scouler, M.D., F. L. S. Communicated 
by the Ethnological Society. 

In Edinburgh New Philosoph. Jour. vol. 41, 
pp. 168-192, Edinburgh, 1846, 8. (Congress.) 

Vocabulary (19 words) of the Chikeelis [Chi 
nook Jargon], compared with the Tlaoquatch 
(of Tolmie) and theNootkan(of Mozino) p. 176. 

Reprinted in the Ethnological Soc. of Lon 
don Jour. vol. 1, pp. 228-252, Edinburgh, n. d., 
8, the vocabulary occurring on p. 236. 

Semple (J. E.) Vocabulary of the Clat- 
sop language. 

Manuscript, 1 leaf, 4, in the library of the 
Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C. Col 
lected in 1870 near Fort Stevens, Oregon. 

Contains 35 words only. 
Sentences: 

Cascade See Lee (D.) and Frost (J. H.) 

Chinook Franchere (G.) 

Chinook Jargon Allen (A.) 
Chinook Jargon Chinook. 
Chinook Jargon Dictionary. 



68 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Sentences Continued. 

Chinook Jargon See Eells (M.) 



Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Clakaraa 



Green (J. S.) 
Hale (H.) 
Leland (C. G.) 
Macfie (M.) 
Macdonald (D.G. F.) 
Stuart (G.) 
Gatschet (A. S.) 



Sermons: 

Chinook Jargon See Eells (M.) 
Chinook Jargon Hale (H.) 

Chinook Jargon New. 

Shortess (Robert). Vocabulary of the 
Lower Chinook. 

Manuscript; title verso blank 1 1. texts 11. 
written on one side only, folio ; in the library of 
the Bureau of Ethnology. Collected in 1853. 
Contains 180 words. 

Smith (Silas B.) On the Chinook names 
of the salmon in the Columbia River. 
By Silas B. Smith. 

In National Museum Proc. vol. 4, pp. 391-392, 
Washington, 1882, 8. (Pilling.) 

Comprises a half-dozen names only. 

Smithsonian Institution : These words following 
a title or within parentheses after a note indi 
cate that a copy of the work referred to has 
been seen by the compiler in the library of that 
institution, Washington, D. C. 

Songs: 

Chinook See Boas (F.) 
Chinook Eells (M.) 

Chinook Jargon Buhner (T. S.) 

Chinook Jargon Crane (A.) 

Sproat (Gilbert Malcolm). Scenes and 
studies | of savage life. | By | Gilbert 
Malcolm Sproat. | [Two lines quota 
tion.] | 

London : Smith, Elder and co. | 1868. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. dedica 
tion verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-x, preface 
pp. xi-xii, text pp. 1-310, appendix pp. 311-317, 
colophon p. [318], 12. 

Chapter xv. Intellectual capacity and lan 
guage (pp. 119-143) includes a vocabulary of 14 
words showing affinities between the Chinook 
Jargon and Aht, p. 139. General discussion of 
the languages, including the Chinook Jargon, 
with examples, pp. 139-142. Note on the Chi 
nook and Jargon- Chinook, pp. 313-314. 

Copies seen : Bancroft, Boston Public, Brit 
ish Museum, Congress, Eames, Georgetown. 

Stanley (J. M.) Portraits | of | North 
American Indians, | with sketches of 
scenery, etc. | painted by | J. M. Stan 
ley. | Deposited with | the Smithsonian 
institution. [Seal of the institution.] | 
Washington: | Smithsonian institu 
tion. | December, 1852. 



Stanley (J. M.) Continued. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso 
names of printers 1 1. preface verso contents 1 1. 
text pp. 5-72, index pp. 73-76, 8. 

Forms Smithsonian Institution Miscellaneous 
Collections, 53 ; also part of vol. 2 of the same 
series, Washington, 1862. 

Contains the names of personages of many 
Indian tribes of the United States, toanumber 
of which is added the English signification. 
Among the peoples represented are the Chi- 
nooks, p. 60; Clackamas, p. 61. 

Copies seen : Bureau of Ethnology, Eames, 
Geological Survey, Pilling, Smithsonian, Wel- 
lesley. 

Steiger(E.) Steiger s | bibliotheca glot- 
tica, | part first. | A catalogue of | Dic 
tionaries, Grammars, Readers, Exposi 
tors, etc. 1 of mostly | modern languages 
| spoken in all parts of the earth, | 
except of | English, French, German, 
and Spanish. | First division : I Abenaki 
to Hebrew. | 

E.Steiger, | 22 & 24 Frankfort Street, 
| New York. [1874.] 

Half-title on cover, title as above verso name 
of printer 1 1. notice dated Sept. 1874 verso 
blank 1 1. text pp. 1-40, advertisements 2 11. col 
ophon on back cover, 12. 

Titles of works relating to American lan 
guages generally, p. 3 ; Chinook, p. 24. 

The second division of the lirst part was not 
published. Part second is on the English lan 
guage and part third on the German language. 

In his notice the compiler states : This com 
pilation must not be regarded as an attempt at 
a complete linguistic bibliography, but solely as 
a bookseller s catalogue for business purposes, 
with special regard to the study of philology 
in America." 

Copies seen : Eames, Pilling. 

Stuart (Granville). Montana as it is; | 
being | a general description of its re 
sources, | both mineral and agricultural, 

| including a | complete description of 
the face of the | country, its climate, 
etc.,] illustrated with a | map of the ter 
ritory, | drawn by capt. W.W. De Lacy, 

| showing the different roads and the 
location of | the different mining dis 
tricts. | To which is appended, | a 
complete dictionary | of | the Snakes 
language, | and also of the | famous 
Chiunook [sic] Jargon, | with | numer 
ous critical and explanatory notes, | 
concerning the habits, superstitions, 
etc., of | these Indians, | with | itiner 
aries of all the routes across the plains. 

| By Granville Stuart. | 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



69 



Stuart (G.) Continued. 

New York: | C. S. Westcott & co., 
printers, | No. 79 John street. | 1865. 

Half-title: A | dictionary j of the | Chinnook 
Jargon, | in use among the tribes of | Oregon, 
Washington territory, British Columbia, | and 
the north Pacific coast, | with | critical and 
explanatory notes. | By Grauville Stuart. 

Cover title as above, large folded map, title 
as above verso copyright notice 1 1. preface pp. 
3-4, text pp. 5-98, half-title verso blank 1 1. 
preface verso rules of pronunciation pp. 101- 
102, text pp. 103-175, 8. 

Dictionary of the Chinnook Jargon, alpha 
betically arranged by English words, pp. 103- 
119. Numerals 1-10, 20, 30, 100, 1000, p. 119. 
Short dialogue in Chinnook Jargon, pp. 120- 
121. Explanatory notes, pp. 122-127. 

Copies seen : Astor, Bancroft, Congress, 
Eames, Georgetown. 

Swan (James Gilchrist). The | north- ! 
west coast; | or, | three years resi- | 
dence in Washington | territory. | By 
James G. Swan. | [Territorial seal.] | 
With numerous illustrations. | 

New York : | Harper & brothers, 
publishers, | Franklin square. | 1857. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright notice 
1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. introduction pp. 
v-rii, contents pp. ix-xiv, list of illustrations p. 
[xv], map, text pp. 17-409, appendix pp. 411-429, 
index pp. 431-435, 12. 

Language of the Indians (pp. 306-326) con 
tains remarks on the Jargon, different methods 
of spelling words by writers, difficulty of 
rightly understanding the Jargon, etc., 
including a comparative vocabulary of Nootka, 
Chenook dialect or Jargon, and English (11 
words), p. 307; explanation of a number of 
Jargon words, pp. 316-317. Vocabulary of the 
Chenook or Jargon (about 250 words, alphabet 
ically arranged) and numerals 1-1000, pp. 415- 
421. Comparative list of 12 words in Nootka, 
and Chenook or Jargon, p. 422. Many Chinook 
terms passim. 

Copies seen : Astor, Bancroft, British 



Swan (J. G.) Continued, 

Museum, Congress, Eames, Geological Survey, 
Harvard, Pilling. 

Issued also with title-page as follows : 

The | northwest coast ; | or, | three 

years residence in Washington | terri 
tory. | By | James G. Swan. | With 
numerous illustrations. | 

London : | Sampson Low, Son & co., 
47 Ludgate hill. | New York : Harper 
& brothers. | 1857. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title 1 1. dedication verso 
blank 1 1. introduction pp. v-vii, contents pp. 
ix-xiv, list of illustrations p. xv, map, text pp. 
17-409, appendix pp. 411-429, index pp. 431- 
435, 12. 

Linguistic contents as undertitle next above. 

Copies seen: Charles L. Woodward, New 
York City. 

Mr. James Gilchrist Swan was born in Med- 
ford, Mass., January 11, 1818, and was educated 
at an academy in that place. In 1833 he went to 
Boston to reside, and remained there until 1849, 
when he left for San Francisco, where he arrived 
in 1850. In 1852 he went to Shearwater Bay, 
where he remained until 1856, when he returned 
east. In 1859 he returned to Puget Sound; since 
then Port Townsend has been his headquarters. 
In 1860 Mr. Swan went to Neah Bay. In June, 
1862, he was appointed teacher of the Makah 
Indian Reservation, where he remained till 1866. 
In 1869 he went to Alaska, and in May, 1875, he 
went a second time to Alaska, this time under 
the direction of the Smithsonian Institution, as 
a commissioner to purchase articles of Indian 
manufacture for the Philadelphia Centennial 
Exposition. This fine collection is now in the 
U. S. National Museum at Washington. July 
31, 1878, Mr. Swan was appointed an inspector 
of customs at Neah Bay, Cape Flattery, and 
remained thereuntil August, 1888, addingmuch 
to our knowledge of the Makah Indians, which 
was reported to Prof. Baird and published in a 
bulletin of the D". S. National Museum. In 1883 
he went to Queen Charlotte Islands for the 
Smithsonian Institution and made another col 
lection for the TJ. S. National Museum. 



T. 



Tate (Rev. Charles Montgomery). Chi 
nook | As Spoken by the Indians | 
of | Washington Territory, British 
Columbia j and Alaska. | For the use 
of Traders, Tourists and others | who 
have business intercourse with | the 
Indians. | Chinook-English. English- 
Chinook. | By | rev. C. M. Tate, | 

Published by M. W. Waitt & co., | 
Victoria, B. C. [1889.] 

Cover title (as above, with the addition of the 
following around the border: Bourchier & 
Higgins, | real estate brokers, j Insurance 



Tate (C. M.) Continued. 

agents. | Financial agents), title as above vergo 
copyright notice (1889) and name of printer 1 L 
preface (May 17, 1889) verso blank 1 1. text pp. 
5-47, 16. 

Parti. Chinook [Jargon] -English, alphabet 
ically arranged, pp. 5-23. Part II. English- 
Chinook [Jargon], alphabetically arranged, pp. 
24-47. Numerals, 1-12, 20, 50, 100, p. 47. 

Copies seen: Eames, Pilling. 
[Hymn in the Chinook language.] 

Manuscript, 1 leaf, 8, in the possession of the 
compiler of this bibliography. 

One v erse and chorus of the hymn "Nothing 
but the blood of Jesus." 



70 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Tate (C. M.) Continued. 

" Mr. Tate came to British Columbia from 
Northumberland, Englaud, in 1870. He engaged 
in mission work among the Flathead Indians 
at Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, in 1871, where 
he learned the Aukamenum language spoken 
by the Indian tribes on the east coast of Van 
couver Island, lower Fraser River, and Puget 
Sound. Here he spent three years, when he 
removed to Port Simpson, on the borders of 
Alaska, among the Tsimpsheans. He next 
moved to the Eraser River and spent seven 
years amongst the Flathead tribes between 
Yale and Westminster, frequently visiting the 
Indians on the Nootsahk River in Washington 
Territory. Mr. Tate spent four years, 1880 to 
1884, among the Bella-Bellas, returning in the 
latter year to themission on Eraser River." 

Ten commandments : 
Chinook Jargon 



Texts: 

Chinook 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 
Chinook Jargon 



See Everette (W. E.) 

See Boas (F.) 

Bulmer (T.S.) 
Demers (M.) 
Dictionary. 
Eells (M.) 



Tolmie (Dr. William Fraser). [Vocabu 
laries of certain languages of the 
northwest coast of America.] 

In Scouler (J.), Observations on the indig 
enous tribes of northwest America, in Royal 
Geog. Soc. of London Jour. vol. 11, pp. 215-251, 
London, 1841, 8. 

Includes, among others, vocabularies of the 
Chenook and Cathlascon, pp. 242-247. 

and Dawson (G. M.) Geological and 

natural history survey of Canada. | 
Alfred R. C. Selwyn, F. R. S., F. G. S., 
Director. | Comparative vocabularies 
| of the | Indian tribes | of | British 
Columbia, | with a map illustrating dis 
tribution. | By | W. Fraser Tolmie, | 
Licentiate of the Faculty of Physicians 
and Surgeons, Glasgow. | And | George 
M. Dawson, D. S., A.S.R.M., F.G.S., &c. 
| [Coat of arms.] | Published by author 
ity of Parliament. | 

Montreal: | Dawson brothers. | 1884. 

Cover title nearly as above, title as above 
verso blank 1 1. letter of transmittal signed by 
G. M. Dawson verso blank 1 1. preface signed by 
G. M. Dawsou pp. 5b-7b, introductory note 
signed by W. F. Tolmie pp. 9fc-12&, text pp. 14&- 
131fc,map,8. 

Vocabulary (243 words) of the Tshinook 
tribe and of the Tilhilooit or upper Tshinook, 
pp. 50&-6M. Comparison of words In various 
Indian languages of North America, among 
them a few in the Chinook, pp. 128&-130&. 

Copies seen : Eauies, Georgetown, Pilling, 
Wellesley. 



Tolmie (W. F.) Continued. 

William Fraser Tolmie was born at 
ness, Scotland, February 3, 1812, and died De^ 
cemberS, 1886, after an illness of only threedays, 
at his residence, Cloverdale, Victoria, B. C. He 
was educated at Glasgow University, where he 
graduated in August, 1832. On September 12 
of the same year he accepted a position as sur 
geon and clerk with the Hudson s Bay Com 
pany, and left home for the Columbia River, 
arriving in Vancouver in the spring of 1833. 
Vancouver was then the chief post of the Hud 
son s Bay Company on this coast. In 1841 he 
visited his native land, but returned in 1842 
overland via the plains and the Columbia, and 
was placed in charge of the Hudson s Bay posts 
on Puget Sound. He here took a prominent part, 
during the Indian war of 1855- 56, in pacifying 
the Indians. Being an excellent linguist, he 
had acquired a knowledge of the native tongues 
and was instrumental in bringing about peace 
between the Americans and the Indians. He 
was appointed chief factor of the Hudson s Bay 
Company in 1855, removed to Vancouver Island 
in 1859, when he went into stock-raising, being 
the first to introduce thoroughbred stock into 
British Columbia ; was a member of the local 
legislature two terms, until 1878; was a member 
of the first board of education for several years, 
exercising a great interest in educational mat 
ters ; held many offices of trust, and was always 
a valued and respected citizen. 

Mr. Tolmie was known to ethnologists for 1m 
contributions to the history and linguistics of 
the native races of the West Coast, and dated 
his interest in ethnological matters from his 
contact with Mr. Horatio Hale, who visited the 
West Coast as an ethnologist to the Wilkes 
exploring expedition. He afterwards trans 
mitted vocabularies of a number of the tribes 
to Dr. Scouler and to Mr. George Gibbs, some 
of which were published in Contributions to 
North American Ethnology. In 1884 he pub 
lished, in conjunction \vitli Dr. G. M. Dawson, a 
nearly complete series of short vocabularies of 
the principal languages met with in British 
Columbia, and his name is to be found fre 
quently quoted as an authority on the history of 
the Northwest Coast and its ethnology. He fre 
quently contributed to the press upon public 
questions and events now historical. 

Townsend (Dr. J. K.) See Haldeman 
(8.8.) 

Treasury. The Treasury of Languages. 
| A | rudimentary dictionary | of | 
universal philology. | Daniel iii. 4. | 
[One line in Hebrew.] | 

Hall and Co., 25, Paternoster row, 
London.) (All rights reserved.) [1873?] 

Colophon : London : | printed by Grant and 
co., 72-78, Turnmill street, E. C. 

Title verso blank 1 1. advertisement (dated 
February 7th, 1873) verso blank 1 1. introduction 



OHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



71 



Treasury C on tinned . 

(signed J. B. and dated October 31st, 1873) pp. 
i-iv, dictionary of languages (in alphabetical 
order) pp. 1-301, list of contributors p. [302], 
errata verso colophon 1 1. 12. 

Edited by James Bonwick,Es<i.,F. R. G. S., 
assisted by about twenty-two contributors, 
whose initials are signed to the most important 
of their respective articles. In the compila 
tion of the work free use was made of Bagster s 
liible of Every Land and Dr. Latham s Ele 
ments of Comparative Philology. There are also 
references to an appendix, concerning whicli 
there is the following note on p. 301 : "Notice. 
Owing to the unexpected enlargement of this 
Book in course of printing, the Appendix is 
necessarily postponed ; and the more especially 
as additional matter has been received sufficient 
to make a second volume. And it will be pro 
ceeded with so soon as an adequate list of Sub 
scribers shall be obtained." Under the name of 
each language is a brief statement of the family 
or stock to which it belongs, and the country 
where it is or was spoken, together with refer 
ences, in many cases, to the principal author 
ities on the grammar and vocabulary. An 
addenda is given at the end of each letter. 

Scattered references to the dialects of the 
Chinookan. 

Copies seen : Eames. 



Tribal names : 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook 



See Boas (F.) 
Douglass (J.) 
Haines (E.H.; 



Triibner & Co. Bibliotheca Hispano- 
Americana. | A | catalogue | of | Span 
ish books | printed in | Mexico, Guate 
mala, Honduras, the Antilles, | Vene 
zuela, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Chili, 
| Uruguay, and the Argentine Repub 
lic; | and of | Portuguese booksprinted 
in Brazil. | Followed by a collection of 
| works on the aboriginal languages 
| of America. | 

On Sale at the affixed Prices, by | 
Triibner & co., | 8 & 60, Paternoster 
row, London. | 1870. | One shilling and 
sixpence. 

Cover title as above verso contents 1 1. no in 
side title; catalogue pp. 1-184, colophon verso 
advertisements 1 1. 16. 

Works on the aboriginal languages of Amer 
ica, pp. 162-184, contains a list of books (alpha 
betically arranged by languages) on this sub 
ject, including general works, pp.. K32-168; 
Chinuk, pp. 169-170. 

Copies seen : Earnes, Pilling. 

A | catalogue | of | dictionaries &d 
grammars j of the Principal Languages 
and Dialects | of the World. | For sale 
by j Triibner & co. | 



Triibner & Co. Continued. 

London: | Triibner & co., 8 & 60 Pa 
ternoster row. | 1872. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso 
names of printers 1 1. notice verso blank 1 1. 
catalogue pp. 1-64, addenda and corrigenda 1 1. 
advertisements verso blank 1 1. a list of works 
relating to the science of language etc. pp. 
1-16,8?. 

Contains titles of a few works in or relating 
to the Chinookan languages, p. 12. 

Copies seen : Eaines, Pilling. 

A later edition with title-page as follows : 

Triibner s | catalogue | of | dictiona 
ries and grammars | of the | Principal 
Languages and Dialects of the World. | 
Second edition, | considerably enlarged 
and revised, with an alphabetical in 
dex. | A guide for students and book 
sellers. | [Monogram.] | 

London: | Triibner & co., 57 and 59, 
Lndgate hill. | 1882. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso list of 
catalogues 1 1. notice and preface to the second 
edition p. iii, index pp. iv-viii, text pp. 1-168, 
additions pp. 169-170, Triibner s Oriental & 
Linguistic Publications pp. 1-95, 8. 

Contains titles of works in American lan 
guages (general), pp. 3. 169 ; Chinook, p. 37. 

Copies seen .- Eames, Pilling. 

Trumbull : This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler in the library of Dr. J.Hammond Trum 
bull, Hartford, Conn . 

[Trumbull (Dr. James Hammond).] Cat 
alogue | of the | American Library | of 
the late | mr. George Brinley, | of Hart 
ford, Conn. | Part I. | America in gen 
eral | New France Canada etc. | the 
British colonies to 1776 j New England | 
[-Part IV. j Psalms and hymns music 
science and art | [&.c. ten lines] | 

Hartford | Press of the Case Lock- 
wood & Brainard Company | 1878 
[-1886] 

4 parts, 8. Compiled by Dr. J. H, Trumbull. 
The fifth and last part is said to be in prepara 
tion. 

Indian languages : general treatises and col 
lections, pant 3, pp. 123-124; Northwest coast, 
p. 141. 

tOapsLea s&en : Eames, Pilling. 

James Hammond Trumbull, philologist, was 
boraj in Stouington, Conn., December 20, 1821. 
He entered Zale in 1838, and though, owing to. 
ill health, he was not graduated with his class, 
his name was enrolled among its members in 
1850 and he was given the degree of A. M. He 
settled in Hartford in 1847 and was assistant 



72 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Trumbull (J. H.) Continued. 

secretary of state in 1847-1852 aud 1858-1861, 
and secretary in 1861-1864, also state librarian in 
1854. Soon after going to Hartford lie joined the 
Connecticut Historical Society, was its corre 
sponding secretary in 1849-1863, and was elected 
its president in 1863. He has been a trustee of 
the Watkiusou free library of Hartford aud its 
librarian since 1863, and has been an officer of 
the Wads worth athenaeum since 1864. Dr. Trum 
bull was an original member of the American 
Philological Association in 1869, and its presi 
dent in 1874-1875. He has been a member of the 
American Oriental Society since 1860 and the 
American Ethnological Society since 1867, and 
honorary member of many State historical soci 
eties. In 1872 he was elected to the National 
Academy of Sciences. Since 1858 he has devoted 
special attention to the subject of the Indian 
languages of North America. He has prepared 
a dictionary and vocabulary to John Eliot s 
Indian bible, and is probably the only Amer 
ican scholar that is now able to read that work. 
In 1873 he was chosen lecturer on Indian lan 
guages of North America at Tale, but loss of 
health and other labors soon compelled his 
resignation. The degree of LL.I). was con 
ferred on him by Tale in 1871 and by Harvard 
in 1887, while Columbia gave him an L.H.I), 
in 1887. Appleton s Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

Tylor (Edward Burnett). Primitive 
culture : | Researches into the develop 
ment of mythology, philosophy, | reli 
gion, art, and custom. | By | Edward 
B. Tylor, | author of " Researches into 
the early history of mankind," &c. | 
[Two lines quotation.] | In two vol 
umes. | Vol. I [-II]. | 

London : | John Murray, Albemarle 
street. | 1871. | (Rights of Translation 
and reproduction reserved.) 

2 vols. : title verso names of printers 1 1. pref 
ace pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-x, text pp. 1-453; 
half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso names of 
printers 1 1. contents pp. v-viii, text pp. 1-410, 
index pp. 411-426, 8. 

Emotional and imitative language (chapters 
v and vi, vol. 1, pp. 145-217) contains, passim, 
words in a number of North American lan 
guages, among them the Chinook and Chinook 
Jargon, pp. 167, 170, 174, 184, 186, 189, 191, 193. 

Copies seen : British Museum, Congress, 
National Museum. 

Primitive Culture | Researches into 
the development of | mythology, phi 
losophy, religion, | language, art and 
custom | By | Edward B. Tylor, LL.D., 
F. R. S | Author of [&c. one line] | 
[Five lines quotation] | First Amer 
ican, from the second English edition | 
In two volumes | Volume I [-II] | 
[Design] | 



Tylor (E. B.) Continued. 

Boston | Estes & Lauriat | 143 Wash 
ington Street | 1874 

2 vols.: half-title (Primitive culture) verso 
blank 1 1. title verso " Author s edition" 1 1. 
preface to the first edition pp. v-vi, preface 
to the second edition pp. vii-viii, contents pp. 
ix-xii, text pp. 1-502 ; half-title verso blank 1 1. 
title verso "Author s edition" 1 1. contents pp. 
v-viii, text pp. 1-453, index pp. 455-470, 8. 

Emotional and imitative language (chapters v 
and vi.vol. 1, pp. 160-239) contains afew Chinook 
and Jargon words on pp. 179, 184, 205. 208, 213. 

Copies seen : National Museum, Powell. 

Primitive Culture | Researches into 

the development of | mythology, phi 
losophy, religion, | language, art and 
custom | By | Edward B. Tylor, LL.D., 
F. R. S | Author of " Researches into 
the Early History of Mankind," &c | 
[Quotation five lines] | First American, 
from the second English edition | In 
two volumes | Volume I [-II] | 

New York | Henry Holt and company 
| 1874 

2 vols. 8. Collation and linguistic contents 
as under title above. 

Copies seen : Powell. 

- Primitive Culture | Researches into 
the development of | mythology, phi 
losophy, religion, | language, art and 
custom | By | Edward B. Tylor, LL.D., 
F. R. S| Author of "Researches into 
the Early History of Mankind/ &c | 
[Quotation five lines] | Second Ameri- 
. can, from the second English edition | 
In two volumes | Volume I [-II] | 
[Design] | 

New York | Henry Holt and company 
| 1877 

2 vols.: half-title (Primitive culture) verso 
blank 1 1. title verso "Author s edition" 1 1. 
preface to t he first edition pp. v-vi, preface to 
the second edition pp. vii-viii, contents pp. ix- 
xii, text pp. 1-502; half title (Primitive culture) 
verso blank 1 1. title verso Author s edition " 
1 1. contents pp. v-viii, text pp. 1-453, index pp. 
455-470, 8. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above. 
Copies seen : Geological Survey. 
Third edition : London, John Murray, 1891, 2 
vols. 8. 

Anthropology: | an introduction to 

the study of j man and civilization. | 
By | Edward B. Tylor, D. C. L., F. R ; . 
| With illustrations. | 
Londd u: | Macmillan and co. | 1885. 
| The Right of Translation and Repro 
duction is Reserved. 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



73 



Tylor (E. B.) Continued. 

Half-title verso design 1 1. title verso names 
of printers 1 1. preface pp. v-viii, contents pp. ix- 
xii.listof illustrations pp .xiii-xv, text pp. 1-440- 
selected books pp. 441-442, indexpp. 443-448, 12. 

A few words, passim, in a number of North 
American languages, among them the Chinook, 
pp. 125, 126. 

Copies seen: Boston Athenaeum, British 
Museum, Congress. 

Anthropology : | an introduction to 
the study of | man and civilization. | 
By | Edward B.Tylor, D. C. L., F. R. S. 
| With illustrations. | 

New York : | D. Appleton and com 
pany, j 1, 3, and 5 Bond street. | 1881. 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 
1. preface pp. v-vii, contents pp. ix-xii, list of 
illustrations pp. xiii-xv, text pp. 1-440, selected 
books pp. 441-442, index pp. 443-448, 12. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 

Copies seen : Congress, Geological Survey, 
National Museum. 

Einleitung | in das | Studium der 

Authropologie | uud | Civilisation | 
von | Dr. Edward B. Tylor, | [&c. one 
line.] | Deutsche [&c. five lines.] | 

Braunschweig, | Druck und Verlag 
von Friedrich Vilwig und Sohn. | 1883. 

Pp. i-xix, 1-538,80. 

Chapters 4 and 5, Die Sprache, pp. 134-178. 

Copies seen : British Museum. 



Tylor (E. B.) Continued. 

The international scientific series | 

Anthropology | An introduction to the 
study of | man and civilization | By 
Edward B. Tylor, D.C.L., F. R. S. | 
With illustrations | 

New York | D. Appleton and com 
pany | 1888 

Half-title of the series verso blank 1 1. title 
as above verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vii, con 
tents pp. ix-xii, list of illustrations pp. xiii-xv, 
text pp. 1-440, selected books pp. 441-442, index 
pp. 443-448, 8. 

Linguistic con tents as under titles above. 

Copies seen : Harvard. 

Anthropology: | an introduction to 

the study of | man and civilization. | 
By | Edward B. Tylor, D. C. L., F. R. S. 
| With illustrations. | Second edition, 
revised. | 

London : | Macmillan and co. | and 
New York. | 1889. | The Right of Trans 
lation and Reproduction is Reserved. 

Half-title verso design 1 1. title verso names 
of printers etc. 1 1. preface pp. v-vii, contents 
pp. ix-xii, list of illustrations pp. xiii-xv, text 
pp. 1-440, selected books etc. pp. 441-442, index 
pp. 443-448, 12. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above. 

Copies seen : Eames. 



V. 



Vater (Dr. Johann Severin). Litteratur 
| der | Grammatiken, Lexika | und | 
Wortersammlungeri | aller Sprachen 
der Erde | von | Johann Severin Vater. 
| Zweite, vollig umgearbeitete Aus- 
gabe | von | B. Jiilg. | 

Berlin, 1847. | In der Nicolaischen 
Buchhandlung. 

Title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 
l.vorwort (signed B. Julg and dated 1. Decem 
ber, 1846) pp. v-x, titles of general works on the 
subject pp. xi-xii, text (alphabetically arranged 
by names of languages) pp. 1-450, nachtrage 
und berichtigungen pp. 451-541, sachregister 
pp. 542-563, autorenregister pp. 564-592, verbes- 
serungen 2 11. 8. 

Titles of works in or containing material 
relating to the Cathlascon, p. 472 ; Chiuuk, pp. 
69, 474. 

Copies seen : Congress, Eames, Harvard. 

At the Fischer sale, no. 1710, a copy sold for Is. 

The earlier edition, Berlin, 1815, contains no 
Chinookan material. 

Vocabulary | of the | Chiuook Jargon : 
| the complete language | used | by the 
| Indians of Oregon, | Washington ter- 
ri- | tory and British possessions. | 



Vocabulary Continued. 

San Francisco : [ published by Hutch- 
ings & Rosenfield, | 146 Montgomery 
street. | Towne & Bacon, printers, 125 
Clay street, cor. Sansome. | 1860. 

Cover title as above, no inside title; text pp. 
1-8, 16o. 

Chinook [Jargon] -English vocabulary, pp. 
1-6. Table of distances, pp. 7-8. 

Copies seen : Bancroft. 

Vocabulary of the Jargon. See Lionuet 



Vocabulary : 
Cathlascon 
Cathlascon 
Cathlascon 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook 
Chinook 



See Buschmann ( J. C. E.) 
Scouler (J.) 
Tolmie(W. F.) 
Anderson (A. C.) 
Buschmann (J. C. E.) 
Chinook. 

Domenech (E. H. D.) 
Dunn (J.) 
Franchere (Gr.) 
Gallatin (A.) 
Hale (H.) 
Knipe (C.) 
Montgomerie (J. H.) 
Piuart (A. L.) 



74 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Vocabulary Continued. 


Vocabulary Continued. 


Chinook 


See Priest (J.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Liounet ( ) 


Chinook 


Ralinesque (C.S.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Macdonald (D. G. F.) 


Chinook 


Ross (A.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Palmer (J.) 


Chinook 


Seouler (J.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Parker (S.) 


Chinook 


Shortess (R.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Richardson (A. D.) 


Chinook 


Tolraie (W.F.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Ross (A.) 


Chinook 


Tolmie (AV. F.) and Daw- 


Chinook Jargon 


Sehooleralt (H. R.) 




son (G. M.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Scouler (J.) 


Chinook 


Wabass ( W. G.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Sproat (G. M.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Anderson (A. C.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Swan (J. G.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Armstrong (A. N.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Vocabulary. 


Chinook Jargon 


Belden (G. P.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Wiiitlirop (T.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Bolduc (J.-B. Z.) 


Clakama 


Gatschet (A.S.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Chamberlain ( A. F.) 


Clatsop 


Emmons (G. T.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Cox (R.) 


Clatsop 


Hale (H.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Dictionary. 


Clatsop 


Lee (D.) and Frost (J.H.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Eells (M.) 


Clatsop 


Seuiple (J. E.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Everette (W. E.) 


Mhaloth 


Hale (H.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Gallatin(A.) 


Wahaikan 


Gatschet (A. S.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Gibbs (G Y 


Wahaikan 


Hale (H.) 


Chinook J argon 


Guide. 


Wappo 


Gatschet (A. S.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Haines (E. M.) 


Wasko 


Cnrtin (J.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Hale (H.) 


Watlala 


Gallatin (A.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Hazlitt ( W. C) 


Watlala 


Hale (H.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Le Jeuiie (J. M.E.) 


Watlala 


Latham (R. G.) 



w. 



Wabass (Dr. W. G.) Vocabulary of the 
Chinook language. 

Manuscript, 1 leaf, 4, in the library of the 
Bureau of Ethnology, Washington, D. C. 
Recorded at Cowlitz landing, Feby., 1858. 

A list of 23 English words with Chinook and 
Cowlitz equivalents. 
Wahaikan : 

See Gatschet (A. S.) 
Hale (H.) 



Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 
Wappo: 

Vocabulary 
Wasko : 

Vocabulary 



See Gatschet (A. S.) 



See Curtin (J.) 



Watkinson : This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler in the Watkiuson library, Hartford, Conn. 
Watlala: 

Grammatic comments See Bancroft (H.H.) 
Vocabulary Gallatiu (A.) 

Vocabulary Hale (H.) 

Vocabulary Latham (R. G.) 

Words Bancroft (H.H.) 

Wellesley : This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com 
piler, belonging to the library of Wellesley col 
lege, Wellesley, Mass. 

"Western. A Western Volapiik. 

In the Critic, vol. 14, pp. 201-202, New York, 
1890,4. (Pilling.) 



Western Continued. 

A review of Hale (H.). An international 
idiom. 

A general discussion, including a number of 
examples, with meanings, of the Chinook Jar 
gon. 

Whymper (Frederick). Travel and ad 
venture | in the | territory of Alaska, | 
formerly Russian America now ceded 
to the | United States and in various 
other | parts of the north Pacific. | By 
Frederick Whymper. j [Design.] | With 
map and illustration. | 

London: | John Murray, Albemarle 
street. | 1868. j The right of Translation 
is reserved. 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso names of 
printers 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface 
pp. vii-ix, contents pp. xi-xix, list of illustra 
tions p. [xx], text pp. 1-306, appendix pp. 307- 
331, map, plates, 8. 

A brief discussion of the Chinuk language, 
with a few examples, pp. 21, 24. 

Copies seen : Boston Public, British Museum, 
Congress. 

At the Field sale, catalogue no. 2539, a copy 
sold for $2.75. 
An American edition titled as follows: 



- Travel and adventure | in the | 
territory of Alaska, | formerly Russian 
America now ceded to the | United 



CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



75 



Whymper (F.) Continued. 

States and in various other | parts of 
the north Pacific. | By Frederick 
Whymper. | [Picture.] | With map and ] 
illustrations. | 

New York: | Harper & brothers, \ 
publishers, | Franklin square. | 1869. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. dedica- i 
tion verso blank 1 1. preface pp. xi-xii, contents j 
pp. xiii-xviii, list of illustrations p. xix, text i 
pp. 21-332, appendix pp. 333-353, map and 
plates, 8. 

Linguistic contents as in the London edition, 
titled next above, pp. 39, 42. 

Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenanirn, 
Geological Survey, Powell. 

Reprinted, 1871, pp. xix, 21-353, 8. 

A French edition titled as follows : 

Frederick Whymper | Voyages et 

aventures | dans | 1 Alaska (ancienne j 
Amerique russe) | Ouvrage traduit de ! 
1 Anglais | avec 1 autorisation de 
1 auteur | par Einile Jonveaux | Illus- 
tre de 37 gravures sur bois | et accom- 
pagne" d une carte | 

Paris | librairie Hachette et C ie | | 
boulevard Saint-Germain, 79 J 1871 j j 
Tons droits reserve s 

Cover title as above, half-title verso name of \ 
printer 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. i-ii, 
half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-405, table 
des chapitres pp. 407-412, map, 8. 

Linguistic contents as under titles above, 
pp. 29-30. 

Copies seen: Pilling. 

Wilson (Daniel). Prehistoric man | Re 
searches into the origin of civilisation j 
| in the old and the new world | By | j 
Daniel Wilson, LL. D. | professor of 
history and English literature in Uni 
versity college, Toronto ; ! author of the 
"Archaeology and prehistoric annals of 
Scotland," etc. | In two volumes. | 
Volume I [-II]. | 

Cambridge: | Macmillan and co., | 
and 23, Henrietta street, Co vent gar 
den, | London, | 1862. | (The right of 
Translation is reserved.) 

2vols.: half-title verso design 1 1. colored 
frontispiece 1 1. title verso name of printer 1 1. 
dedication verso blank 1 1. preface pp. vii-xvi, 
contents pp. xvii-xviii, text pp. 1-488, plan; 
half-title verso design 1 1. colored frontispiece 
11. title verso name of printer 1 1. contents pp. 
v-vi, text pp. 1-475, appendix pp. 478-483, index 
pp. 485-499, verso advertisement, 8. 

Remarks on the Chinook Jargon, with exam 
ples, vol. 2, pp. 429-432. 

Copies seen: British Museum, Congress, 
Eames, Watkmsou. 



Wilson (D.) Continued. 

Prehistoric man | Researches into 

the origin of civilisation | in the old 
and the new world | By | Daniel Wil 
son, LL.D. | professor [&c. two lines.] 
| Second edition. | 

London : | Macmillan and co. j 1865. | 
(The right of Translation is reserved.) 

Half-title verso design 1 1. colored frontispiece 
1 1, title verso name of printer 1 1. dedication 
verso blank 1 1. contents pp. vii-xiii, colored 
plate 1 1. illustrations pp. xv-xvi, preface (dated 
29th April 1865) pp. xvii-xviii, preface to the 
first edition pp. xix-xxvi, half-title verso blank 
1 1. text pp. 1-622, index pp. 623-635, 8. 

Remarks on the Oregon Jargon, with exam 
ples, pp. 586-588. 

Copies seen : British Museum, Eames. 

Prehistoric man | Researches into 

the Origin of Civilisation | in the Old 
and the New World. | By | Daniel Wil 
son, LL. D., F. R. S. E. | professor [&e. 
two lines.] | Third edition, revised and 
enlarged, | with illustrations. | In two 
volumes, j Vol.1 [-II]. | 

London:) Macmillan and Co. | 1876. | 
(The right of Translation is reserved.) 

2 vols. : half-title verso design 1 1. colored 
frontispiece 1 1. title verso names of printers 1 
1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface (dated 18th 
November 1875) pp. vii-viii, contents pp. ix- 
xiii, illustrations pp. xiv-xv, text pp. 1-399; 
half-title verso design 1 1. colored frontispiece 
1 1. title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-ix, 
illustrations pp.x-xi, text pp. 1-386, index pp. 
387-401, list of works by the same author etc. 
11.80. 

Remarks on the Chinook language or Oregon 
Jargon, with examples, vol. 2, pp. 334-338. 

Copies seen : British Museum, Eames, Har 
vard. 

Winthrop (Theodore). The canoe and 
the saddle, | adventures among the 
northwestern | rivers and forests ; | and 
Isthmania. | By Theodore Winthrop, | 
author of [&c. two lines.] | 
Boston : | Ticknor and Fields. | 1863. 

Title verso copyright notice and names of 
printers 1 1. contents verso blank 1 1. text pp. 
5-375, 16o. 

A partial vocabulary (about 275 wor.ls and 
phrases, alphabetically arranged) of the Chi 
nook Jargon, pp. 299-302. 

Copies seen: Bancroft, Boston Athenaeum, 
Congress, Harvard, Mallet. 

I have seen mention of an edition: New 
York, 1876, 16. 

Theodore Winthrop, author,- born in New 
Haven, Conn., September 22, 1828, died near 
Great Bethel, Va., June 10, 1861, was the aou of 



76 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE CHINOOKAN LANGUAGES. 



Winthrop (T.) Continued. 

Francis Bayard Winthrop. He was graduated 
at Yale in 1848, with the Clark scholarship, on 
which he continued there a year, studying 
mental science, languages, and history. In 1849 
he went to recruit his health in Europe, where 
he remained until January, 1851. There he 
became acquainted with William H. Aspiu- 
wall, whose children he taught for some time, 
and through him Winthrop entered the employ 
of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, to 
whose offices in Panama he was transferred in 
1852. In the following year he visited Cali 
fornia and Oregon, and thence he returned over 
land to New York. In December, 1853, he 
joined, as a volunteer, the expedition under 
Lieut. Isaac G. Strain, to survey a canal route 
across the Isthmus of Panama, and soon after 
his return, in March, 1854, he began to study 
law with Charles Tracy. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1855. At the opening of the civil 
war Winthrop enlisted in the Seventh New 
York regiment, which he accompanied to Wash 
ington. Soon afterward he went with Gen. 
Benjamin F. Butler to Fort Monroe as military 
secretary, with the rank of major, and with his 
commanding officer he planned the attack on 
Little and Great Bethel, in which he took part. 
During the action at the latter place he sprang 
upon a log to rally his men and received a 
bullet in his heart. Appleton s Cyclop, of Am. 
Blog. 



Wisconsin Historical Society : These words, fol 
lowing a title or within parenthesis after a note, 
indicate that a copy of the work referred to has 
been seen by the compiler in the library of that 
institution, Madison, Wis. 



Words: 




Cathlascon 


See Buschmann (J. C. ft.) 


CiTthlascon 


Latham (R. G.) 


Chinook 


Bancroft (H. H.) 


Chinook 


Brinton (D. G.) 


Chinook 


Buschmann (J. C. E.) 


Chinook 


Chamberlain (A. F.) 


Chinook 


Daa(L.K.) 


Chinook 


Grasserie (R. de laK 


Chinook 


Haines (E.M.) 


Chinook 


Latham (R. G.) 


Chinook 


Platzmann (J.) 


Chinook 


Pott (A.F.) 


Chinook 


Smith (S.B.) 


Chinook 


Tylor (E.B.) 


Chinook 


Youth s. 


Chinook Jargon 


Chamberlain (A.F.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Crane (A.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Chase ( P. E.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Bella (M.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Latham (R.G.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Leland(C. G.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Norris(P. W.) 


Chinook Jargon 


Tylor (E.B.) 


Ciiinook Jargon 


Wilson (D.) 


Watlala 


Bancroft (H. H.) 



Y. 



Youth s. The youth s | companion : | A 
juvenile monthly Magazine published 
for | the benefit of the Puget Sound 
Catholic Indian | Missions; and set to 
type, printed and in part | written by 
the pupils of the Tulalip, Wash. Ty. | 
Indian Industrial Boarding Schools, 
under | the control of the Sisters of 
Charity. | Approved by the Rt. Rev. 
Bishop f^gidius, of Nesqualy.] | Vol. I. 
May, 1881. No. l[-Vol. V. May, 1886. 
No. 60]. 

[Tulalip Indian Reservation, Snoho- 
mishCo.W.T.] 



Youth s Continued. 

Edited by Rev. J. B. Boulet. Instead of beiug 
paged continuously, continued articles have a 
separate pagination dividing the regular num 
bering. For instance, in no. 1, pp. 11-14, Lives 
of the saints, are numbered 1-4 and the article 
is continued in no. 2 on pp. 5-8, taking the place 
of pp. 41-44 of the regular numbering. Dis 
continued after May, 188t5, on account of the 
protracted illness of the editor. 

Lord s prayer in the Cascade language, p. 
284. The name of God in 70 different lan 
guages, among them the Chinook, vol. 2, p. 247. 

Copies seen : Congress, Georgetown, Welles- 
ley. 



CHRONOLOGIC INDEX, 



1820 


Chinook 


Vocabulary 


Franchere (G.) 


1830 


Jargon 


Sentences 


Green (J.S.) 


1831 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Cox (R.) 


1832 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Cox (R.) 


1832-1833 


Chinook 


Vocabulary 


Rafinesque (C. S.) 


1833 


Chinook 


Vocabulary 


Priest (J.) 


1835 


Chinook and Jargon 


Vocabularies 


Chinook. 


1836 


Chinook 


Vocabulary 


Gallatin (A. S.) 


1838 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Parker (S.) 


1840 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Parker (S.) 


1840-184? 


Jargon 


Various 


Blanchet (F. N.) 


1841 


Chinook 


Tribal names 


Gairdner ( ) . 


1841 


Chinook and Cathlascon 


Vocabularies 


Scouler (J.) 


1841 


Chinook and Cathlascon 


Vocabularies 


Tolmie (W. F.) 


1842 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Parker (S.) 


1843 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Bolduc (J.-B. Z.) 


1844 


Cathlascon 


Various 


Lee (D.) and Frost (J. H.) 


1844 


Chinook 


Lord s prayer, etc. 


Duflot de Mofraa (E.) 


1844 


Chinook 


Vocabulary 


Dunn (J.) 


1844 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Parker (S.) 


1846 


Cathlascon 


Words 


Latham (R. G.) 


1846 


Chinook 


Vocabulary 


Dunn (J.) 


1846 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Parker (S.) 


1846 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Scouler (J.) 


1846 


Various 


Various 


Hale (H.) 


1846 


Various 


Various 


Hale (H.) 


1847 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Palmer (J.) 


1847 


Various 


Bibliographic 


Vater (J. S.) 


1848 


Chinook 


Proper names 


Catlin (G.) 


1848 


Chinook and Cathlascon 


Words 


Latham (R. G.) 


1848 


Chinook and Jargon 


Vocabularies 


Montgomerie (J. E.) 


1848 


Jargon 


Sentences 


Allen ( A. J.) 


1848 


Various 


Various 


Gallatin (A.) 


1849 


Chinook and Jargon 


Vocabularies 


Ross (A.) 


1850 


Jargon 


Sentences 


Allen (A. J.) 


1850 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Latham (R. G.) 


1850 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Palmer (J.) 


1851 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Palmer (J.) 


1851-1857 


Chinook 


Classification 


Schoolcraft (H. R.) 


1852 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Berghaus (H.) 


1852 


Chinook 


Proper names 


Catlin (G.) 


1852 


Chinook and Clakania 


Proper names 


Stanley (J. M.) 


1852 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Palmer (J.) 


1853 


Chinook 


Classification 


Gallatin (A.) 


1853 


Chinook 


Vocabulary 


Shortess (K.) 


1853 


Clatsop 


Vocabulary 


Emmons (G. F.) 


1853 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Lionnet (--) . 


1854 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Franchere (G.) 


1856 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Latham (R. G.) 


1856 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Blanchet (F.N.) 


1857 


(Chinook 


Words 


Daa (L. K.) 








77 



78 



CHRONOLOGIC INDEX. 



1857 


Chinook and Jargon 


Vocabularies 


Swan (J. G.) 


1857 


Chinook and Jargon 


Vocabularies 


Swan (J. G.) 


1857 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Anderson (A. C.J 


1857 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Armstrong (A. N.J 


1858 


Chinook 


Classification 


Jehan (L. F.) 


1858 


Chinook 


Vocabulary 


Buschmann (J. C. E.) 


1858 


Chinook and Jargon 


Bibliographic 


Ludewig (H. E.) 


1858 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Anderson (A. C.) 


1858 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Chinook. 


1858 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Guide-book. 


1858 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Hazlitt (W. C.) 


1858 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Wabass (W. G.) 


1859 


Jargon 


Sentences 


Allen (A. J.) 


1859 


Chinook 


Vocabulary, etc. 


Buschmann (J. C. E.) 


1860 


Chinook 


Classification 


Schoolcraft (H. R.) 


1860 


Chinook 


Numerals 


Haldeman (S. S.) 


1860 


Chinook 


Vocabulary, etc. 


Domenech (E. H. D.) 


1860? 


Jargon 


Text 


Demers (M.) 


1860 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Vocabulary. 


1860 


Various 


Various 


Latham (R. G.) 


1862 


Chinook 


Words 


Pott (A. F.) 


1862? 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Blanchet (F.N.) 


1862 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Dictionary. 


1862 ? 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Gibbs (G.) 


1862 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Macdonald (D.G. F.) 


1862 


Jargon 


General discussion 


Wilson (D.) 


1862 


Watlala 


Vocabulary 


Latham (R. G.) 


1863 


Chinook 


Bibliographic 


Gibbs (G.) 


1863 


Chinook 


Dictionary 


Gibbs (G.) 


1863 


Chinook 


Dictionary 


Gibbs (G.) 


1863 


Jargon 


Bibliographic 


Gibbs (G.) 


1863 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Gibbs (G.) 


1863 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Gibba (G.) 


1863 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Gibbs (G.). note. 


1863 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Macdonald (D. G. F.), note. 


1863 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Winthrop (T.) 


1864 


Chinook 


Classification 


Jehan (L.F.) 


1865 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Dictionary. 


1865 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Stuart (G.) 


1865 


Jargon 


General discussion 


Wilson (D.) 


1865 


Jargon 


Sentences 


Macfie (M.) 


1866 


Jargon 


Hymns 


Macleod (X. D.) 


1867 


Chinook and Jargon 


Bibliographic 


Leclerc (C. 


1867 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Richardson (A. D.) 


1868 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Whymper (F.) 


1868 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Blanchet (F. N.) 


]868 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Sproat (G.M.) 


1868-1892 


Chinook 


Bibliographic 


Sabin (J.) 


1869 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Whymper (F.) 


1869 


Jargon 


Numerals 


Chase (P. E.) 


1869 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Richardson (A. D.), note. 


186? 


Jargon 


Hymns 


Macleod (X.D.) 


1870 


Chinook 


Bibliographic 


Triibner & Co. 


1870 


Clatsop 


Vocabulary 


Semple (J. E.) 


1870 


Jargon 


Lord s prayer 


Marietti (P.) 


1871 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Whymper (F.) 


1871 


Chinook 


Proper names 


Catlin (G.) 


1871. 


Chinook and Jargon 


"Words 


Tylor (E. B.) 


1871 


Jargon 


Dictionary, etc. 


Demers (M.), et al. 


1871? 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Dictionary. 


1872 


Chinook 


Bibliographic 


Triibner & Co. 


1872 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Langevin (H. L.) 


1873 


Chinook and Jargon 


Bibliographic 


Field (T. W.) 


1873? 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Blanchet (F. ~X.) 


1873 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Dictionary. 


1874 


Chinook and Jargon 


"Words 


Tylor (E. B.) 



CHRONOLOGIC INDM. 



1874 


Chintibk and Jargon 


Words 


Tylor (E. B.) 


1874-1876 


Various 


Various 


Bancroft (H. H.) 


1875 


Chinook and Jarguii 


Bibliographic 


Field (T. W.) 


1875 


Jargdii 


General disciission 


Eells (M.j 


1875 


Jargdii 


Sermons 


Eells (M.) 


1875 


Jargori 


Vocabulary 


Richardson (A. D.) 


1876 


Chinook 


Bibliographic 


Platzmanu (J.) 


1870 


Jargtfti 


General discussion 


Wilson (D.) 


1876 


Jar gdu 


Words 


Clough (J. C.) 


1877 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Gatschet (A. S.) 


1877 


Chinook 


Songs 


Eells (M.) 


1877 


Chinook 


General discussion 


lieaeit ^w. W.) 


1877 


Chinook and Jargon 


Words 


Tylor (E. 6.) 


1877 


Clakama 


Vocabulary 


Gatschet ( A. S.) 


1877? 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Dictionary. 


1877 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Guide. 


1877 


Wasco 


Vocabulary 


Gatschet (A. S.) 


1877-1887 


Chinook 


Grammatic 


Miiller (F.) 


1878 


Chinook 


Classification 


Keane (A. H.) 


1878 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Bates (H.W.) 


1878 


Chinook 


Words 


Duncan (D.) 


1878 


Chinook and Jargon 


Bibliographic 


Leclerc (C.) 


1878 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Blanchet (F.N.) 


1878? 


Jat gdii 


Dictionary 


Gill (J.K.),note. 


1878 


Jargon 


Hymn book 


Eells (M.) 


1878-1886 


Various 


Bibliographic 


Trumbull (J. H.) 


1879 


J argon 


Dictionary 


Blanchet (F. N.) 


1880 


Chinook 


Classification 


Sayce (A. H.) 


1880 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Good (J.B.) 


1880-1881 


Jargon 


Grammatic 


Eells (M,) 


1881 


Chinook and Jargon 


Words 


Tylor (E.B.) 


1881 


Chinook and Jargon 


Words 


Tylor (E.B.) 


1881-1886 


Cascade 


Vocabulary 


Youth s. 


1882 


Chinook 


Bibliographic 


Trilbner & Co. 


1882 


Chinook 


Classification 


Keane (A. H.), note. 


1882 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Bates (H.W.) 


1882 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Drake (S. G.) 


1882 


C hinook 


Words 


Smith (S.B.) 


1882 


Chinook and Jargon 


Bibliographic 


Eells (M.) 


1882 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Gill (J.K.) 


1882 


Various 


Various 


Bancroft (H. H.) 


1883 


Chinook and Jargon 


Words 


Tylor (E. B.) 


1883 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Dictionary. 


1883 


Jargon 


Lord s prayer- 


Everette (W. E.) 


1883 


Jargon 


Lord s prayer 


Everette (W. E.) 


1883 


Jargon 


Words 


Norris (P. W.) 


1884 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Schoolcraft (H.K.) 


1884 


Chinook 


Vocabularies 


Tolmie (W. F.) and Dawson 








(G.M.) 


1884 


Chinook 


Lord s prayer 


Bergholtz (G. F.) 


1884 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Gill (J. K.) 


1881 


Jargon 


Hymns 


Everette (W. E.) 


1884 


Jargon 


Ten commandments 


Everette (W. E.) 


1884 


Wasco 


Vocabulary 


Curtin (J.) 


1884-1887 


Chinook 


Bibliographic 


Pott (A. F.) 


1885 


Chinook 


Classification 


Keane ( A. H.), note. 


1885 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Bates (H. W.) 


1885 


Various 


Bibliographic 


Pilling (J. C.) 


1885-1883 


Chinook 


General discussion 


Featherman (A.) 


1880 


Chinook 


Proper names 


Catlin (G.) 


1886 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Diirieu (P.), note. 


1886 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Le Jeune (J. M. R.) 


1886 


Jargon 


Hymns 


Eells (M.) 


1886 


Various 


Bibliographic 


Quaritch (B.) 


1887 


Chinook 


Proper names 


Catlin (G.) 


1887 


Chinook 


Proper names 


Catlin (G.) 



80 



CHRONOLOGIC INDEX, 



1887 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Dictionary. 


1887 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Dictionary. 


1887 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Gill (J. K ) 


1887 


Various 


Bibliographic 


Dufosse (E.) 


1887 


Various 


Bibliographic 


Quaritch (B.) 


1887 


Various 


Bibliographic 


Quaritch (B.) 


1888 


Chinook 


Numerals 


Eells (M.) 


1888 


Chinook 


Proper names 


Catliu (G.) 


1888 


Chinook 


Words 


Brinton (D. G.) 


1888 


Chinook 


Words 


Brinton (D. G.) 


1888 


Chinook and Jargon 


Various 


Haines (E. M.) 


1888 


Chinook and Jargon 


Words 


Tylor (E.B.) 


1888 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Prosch (T. W.) 


1888 


Jargon 


General discussion 


Leland (C. G.) 


1888 


Jargon 


Numerals 


Eells (M.) 


1888 


Jargon 


Numerals 


Eells (M.).note. 


1888 


Jargon 


Songs 


Boas (F.) 


1889 


Chinook and Jargon 


Words 


Tylor (E. B.) 


1889 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Dictionary. 


1889 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Gill (J.K.) 


1889 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Tate (C. M.) 


1889 


Jargon 


Hymn book 


Eells (M.) 


1889 


Jargon 


Numerals 


Eells (M.) 


1889 


Jargon 


Vocabulary 


Nicoll (E. H.) 


1890 


Chinook 


Words 


Brinton (D. G.) 


1890 


Chinook 


Words 


Grasserie(R.dela). 


1890 


Chinook 


Words 


Hale (H.) 


1890 


Chinook 


Words 


Hale (H.) 


1890 


Jargon 


Dictionary, etc. 


Hale (H.) 


1890 


Jargon 


Review- 


Crane (A.) 


1890 


Jargon 


Review 


Lelaml (C. G.) 


1890 


Jargon 


Review 


Western. 


1890 


Jargon 


Sermon 


New. 


1891 


Chinook 


Classification 


Brinton (D. G.) 


1891 


Chinook 


Classification 


Powell (J. W.) 


1891 


Chinook 


Classification 


Powell (J. W.) 


1891 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Coones (S. F.) 


1891 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Gill (J.K.) 


1891 


Jargon 


Hymn book 


Le Jeune ( J. M. R.) 


1891 


Jargon 


Periodical 


Lo Jeune (J.M.R.) 


1891 


Jargon 


Periodical 


Le Jeune (J.M.R.) 


1891 


Jargon 


Periodical 


Le Jeune (J.M.R.) 


1891 


Jargon 


Review 


Charencey (H. de). 


1891 


Jargon 


Words 


Chamberlain (A. F.) 


1891-1893 


Jargon 


Periodical 


Le Jeune ( J. M. R.) 


1892 


Jargon 


Bible history 


St. Onge (L. N. ) 


1892 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Le Jeune (J.M.R.) 


1892 


Jargon 


Play 


Le Jeune (J.M.R.) 


1892 


Jargon 


Primer 


Le Jeune (J.M.R.) 


1892 


Various 


Geographic names 


Eells (M.) 


1893 


Chinook 


Grammar, dictionary 


Boas (F.) 


1893 


Chinook 


Grammatic 


Boas (F.) 


1893 


Chinook 


Texts 


Boas (F.) 


1893 


Chinook 


Various 


Boas (F.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Bible history 


Durieu (P.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Bible history 


St. Onge (L. N.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Bulmer (T. S.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Buhner (T.S.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Bulmer (T.S.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Bulmer (T. S.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


Eells (M.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Dictionary 


St. Onge (L. N.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Grammar, dictionary 


Bulmer (T. S.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Hymns 


St. Onge (L.N.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Hymns, songs 


Bulmer (T. S.) 


1893 


Jargon 


Legends 


St. Onge (L. N.) 



CHRONOLOGIC INDEX. 



81 



189;$ 

1893 

1893 

1893 

f 



Jargon 

Jargon 

Jargon 

Jargon 

Jargon 

Chinook 

Chinook and Jargon 

Jargon 

Jargon 

Various 



Lord s prayer 

Prayers 

Reader 

Various 

Vocabulary 

Hymns 

Vocabularies 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Tribal names 



Buhner (T. S.) 
Buhner (T. S.) 
Le Jeune (J. M. R.) 
Bulrner (T. S.) 
Chamberlain (A. F.) 
Tate (C. M.) 
Pinart (A. L.) 
Belden (G-. P.) 
Bella (M.) 
Douglass (J.) 



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